Now Available in Israel: American Beef! For the first time in over 20 years, American kosher beef is available for Israeli consumers.

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Now Available in Israel: American Beef!

 

For the first time in over 20 years, American kosher beef is available for Israeli consumers.  

 

 

The first shipment of American kosher beef has finally arrived in Israel and will be available for commercial distribution to restaurants, hotels, stores and supermarkets. The beef, select cuts of chilled Black Angus, arrived in Israel last week from the state of Nebraska. The renewal of importation was allowed after an agreement was signed in February 2016 between the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Israeli Veterinary Services.

 

 

U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro, who hosted an event at his residence to celebrate the occasion, said: “I am so excited to have this chance to see, and taste, American kosher beef here in Israel. This development marks yet another milestone in our government-to-government cooperation and one which further strengthens the economic ties between our nations.”

 
 
 
 
 

Lieutenant Governor of Nebraska Mike Foley, who is currently visiting Israel, said: “I’m so thrilled to be in Israel to celebrate the arrival of high-quality beef from my home state of Nebraska. Nebraska beef is known as the best in the world, and I'm sure that Israelis will soon agree!”

 
 
 

 

 

 

Fact Sheet:  Beef Importation to Israel

Importation to Israel

  • The authorized duty-free quota of chilled U.S. beef for 2016 is 1,424 tons.

  • The cuts will come from Black Angus beef.

  • Currently, cuts that will be imported from the United States will not include the hindquarters.

  • At the moment, all beef imported to Israel from the United States originates from the WR Reserve Black Angus Company slaughterhouse in Hastings, Nebraska.

  • The slaughter is conducted under strict Kashrut rules and has received Kashrut certification from the Chief Rabbinate of Israel.   

Why U.S. Beef and What Makes Nebraska Beef So Special?

U.S. Beef Industry Facts:

  • The U.S. is the world’s largest beef producer, accounting for nearly one-fifth of global beef production.

  • Commercial beef production was 10.75 million metric tons (23.8 billion pounds), with slaughter at 28.8 million head in 2015.  

  • On January 1, 2016, the total cattle inventory in the U.S. was 92 million head, up 3%from 2015.  

  • Commercial beef production is expected to be 11.36 million metric tons in 2016, up 5.7% from 2016 (25.1 billion pounds).  Beef production is expected to continue to expand in 2017.  

  • In addition to being the largest producer, the United States is the largest beef consumer, with 20% of global beef consumption in 2015, and it is also a top beef importer.   

  • The United States is one of the four largest beef exporters along with Brazil, India, and Australia.  Top U.S. beef export markets include Japan, Mexico, Korea, Canada, Hong Kong, and Egypt.

  • In 2015, U.S. beef and variety meat exports totaled 1.1 million metric tons (2.35 billion pounds) valued at $6.3 billion.  13% of U.S. beef and variety meat production was exported in 2015.

  • The U.S. was the second largest exporter on a value basis in 2015, and U.S. beef accounted for nearly one-fifth of global export value.

  • Through September 2016, U.S. beef and variety meat exports totaled 848,930 metric tons (1.87 billion pounds), up 8% from 2015.  U.S. beef and variety meat export value was $4.5 billion, down 5 percent from 2015.  

  • In 2012, there were over 913,000 cattle and calf operations in the U.S., with the average herd size at 98 head, according to the 2012 Agricultural Census.  

  • In 2012, there were over 26,500 feedlot operations with an average herd size of 541 head.  



Nebraska: The Beef State

  • Beef is Nebraska’s single largest industry and the engine that powers the state’s economy.

  • Agriculture is the #1 industry in Nebraska and cattle production represents the largest segment of the industry.

  • The importance of cattle feeding to Nebraska’s economy runs deeper than in other states. Nearly 5 million head are finished and marketed in Nebraska, a state with a population of 1.8 million residents. Texas markets a third more cattle than Nebraska, but it has a population of 25.6 million residents--over 14 times larger.

  • January 2012 figures show Nebraska continues to have far more cattle than people. Cattle outnumber Nebraskans nearly 4 to 1. Nebraska has 1.94 million cows and 1.8 million people. The cows and the 4.7 million head that are annually fed in Nebraska total nearly 6.64 million cattle.

  • Nebraska has the top three cow counties in the U.S., including the nation’s No. 1 cow county – Cherry County, with nearly 166,000 cows. Custer County is No. 2 (100,000). Holt County is No. 3 (99,000). Lincoln County is No. 12 (69,000).

  • Nebraska has a unique mix of natural resources. Cattle turn grass from 24 million acres of rangeland and pasture, more than one half of Nebraska’s land mass, into protein and many other products for humans. The land grazed by cattle allows more people to be fed than would otherwise be possible. More than one billion bushels of corn are produced each year, 40% of which is fed to livestock in the state. Cattle-producing families, who make their living from the land, have a strong incentive to protect their animals and the environment.

Nebraska’s Natural Resources

  • Nebraska’s farms and ranches utilize more than 184 million dunams (18,413,270 hectares)– 93% of the state’s total land area. As a comparison, in Israel there are less than 4 million dunams used for agriculture.

  • Nebraska is fortunate to have aquifers below it.

  • The state has 92,233 registered, active irrigation wells supplying water to 34 million dunams of harvested cropland and pasture.

  • Nearly 24,000 miles (38,624 kilometers) of rivers and streams add to Nebraska’s natural resources.

  • There are nearly (9,307,807 hectares) 93 million dunams of rangeland and pastureland in Nebraska.

  • Superior animal husbandry is the rule and one of the secrets to raising great beef. Ill-treated animals could never achieve the quality levels that Nebraska’s customers demand.  Nebraska’s approved and inspected small family growers always treat their animals in a kind and humane manner; nothing could be more important to a responsible rancher.



This combination of feeding methods gives Nebraska the best quality beef possible and assures sustainability.

  • Nebraska cuts all high-grade meats by hand and in-house and sells fresh or frozen –never uses gas packaging, preservatives or color stabilizers to extend the life or improve the look.

  • Due to its qualities and demand U.S beef is exported to more than 130 countries around the world.

 
 
 Photo  Silvia Golan