“Tango, Buenos Aires” - Marcos Ayala Tango Company

 

Marcos Ayala,  one of the greatest tango dancers in the world!

 

Passover, 12-15 of April, 2017, 

 

"Tango Buenos Aires”, Tango as never seen before. One of the most dynamic, elegant, exciting, and sensuous performances touring around the world, sharing the cultural essence and evolution of tango through the art of dance and music.
 TANGO from ARGENTINA, is inspired by the beats of big cities, featuring an award-winning cast with world-class dancers, accompanied by the rhythms of an orchestra with members of symphonic and philharmonic ensembles.

"Tango Buenos Aires” is composed of 12 excellent dancers, with high professionalism and histrionics transformed into an art show.


 Dare to experience the TANGO from ARGENTINA sensation........

 

“Tango Buenos Aires” is a musical show designed so that the public can for a moment imagine how the tango has evolved along the history in Buenos Aires. Through his musical style, how to dress and behave, the spirit of the dance, sensuality and charisma have survived to this day.

 

Marcos Ayala, director, choreographer and dancer, proposes a constant reinvention of the genre to keep Tango current through the generations.

 

With his company, he has achieved a language of great significance that leaves the astonished audience in their expectations.  He also expresses all his experience and knowledge through choreographic creations of contemporary stories without neglecting the style of dance that he best interprets, tango".

 

Marcos Ayala with his partner, Paola Camacho, create a perfect dance couple, with synchronous movements of great interpretive technique. His virtuosity leaves amazed the audience as well as the participation of other dance couples that making up the Company.

 

 

 

 

An spectacular show, full of passion and sensuality, which will carry you to the streets of Buenos Aires.

The company will arrive to Israel with a cast of talented artists on scene, acclaimed with great success throughout the world, especially for the tango lovers. 
You are cordially invited to enjoy them by reserving seats in advance. 

Links for watching the clip:

 

https://youtu.be/cXEWzQKYBHw

 

 

https://youtu.be/xqb49hz-uM4

 

 

Discount:  50% discount!! Indicating the discount code "5050" in the website or by phone.

 

Websitehttp://bit.ly/TANGO-DELLAL1or

 

http://www.suzannedellal.org.il/shows/%D7%98%D7%A0%D7%92%D7%95-%D7%90%D7%A8%D7%92%D7%A0%D7%98%D7%99%D7%A0%D7%90%D7%99?utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=TANGO&utm_medium=page&utm_content=ARGENTINA1

 

 

Phone:03-5105656

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On Sunday night, March 12th, the movie “A Date for Mad Mary” was screened at Cinematheque Tel Aviv, opening Irish Film Week. The movie is one of five different films that will be played in Tel-Aviv, Haifa, and Jerusalem.

 

Irish Film Week is an annual event bringing some of the best Irish films to international audiences. This year’s festival will be from March 12-17. The films that will be shown include A Date for Mad May; Glass Land; Viva; Born and Reared (documentary), and The wall (documentary).

 

At Sunday’s screening, H.E. Ambassador Alison Kelly introduced the festival, welcoming the guests and announcing the lineup of films to be shown to the audience. Among the guests in attendance were Zvi Gabi, Israel’s first Ambassador to Ireland, who founded the Israeli Embassy in Ireland in 1996, Slovenian Ambassador to Israel H.E. Ms. Barbara Sušnik, H.E. Mr. Werner Matias Romero, the Ambassador of the Republic of El Salvador, and H.E. Mr. Jesper Vahr, Ambassador of the Kingdom of Denmark.

 

According to Ambassador Kelly, this year’s Irish Film Week “highlights the diversity of modern Irish film from the dark comedy of "A Date for Mad Mary" to the powerful drama of ‘Viva.,” and “showcases the best of young Irish talent including director Mark O'Halloran (Viva) and actor Jack Raynor.”

 

 Photo  Silvia G Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purim, one of Judaism's more colorful and popular holidays, is celebrated this year between sunset Saturday, 11 March, and sunset Sunday, 12 March, in most of Israel – excluding Jerusalem where Purim will be celebrated from sunset on Sunday, 12 March, until sunset on Monday, 13 March (see below). Purim is not a public holiday in Israel, but many offices, shops, and public institutions will operate on a reduced basis. Schools will be closed, but public transportation will operate as usual, and newspapers will be published.

 

 

Background to Purim

Purim commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther. In Esther 3:8, the anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, tells Persian King Ahasuerus that, “There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among all the peoples... in your kingdom. Their laws are different from those of every people, neither do they keep the king's laws. Therefore, it does the king no profit to suffer them. If it please the king, let it be written that they be destroyed...” Thus, Haman coined one of the most infamous anti-Semitic canards: That the Jews are a clannish and alien people who do not obey the laws of the land. At Haman's contrivance, a decree is then issued for all Jews in the Persian Empire to be massacred. But, as the Book of Esther subsequently relates, Haman’s plot was foiled and, “The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honor...a feast and a good day.” (8:16-17)

Throughout the centuries, Purim – which celebrates the miraculous salvation of the Jews and the thwarting of Haman’s genocidal plot – has traditionally symbolized the victory of the Jewish people over anti-Semitic tyranny. As such, Purim is a happy, carnival-like holiday. 



The Fast of Esther

The day before Purim is a fast day known as the Fast of Esther, commemorating (inter alia) the fact that Queen Esther – the heroine of the Book of Esther – and the entire Persian Jewish community fasted (4:16) in advance of Queen Esther’s appeal for King Ahasuerus not to implement Haman’s genocidal plot. The fast will extend from before sunrise in the morning until sunset. Special prayers and scriptural readings are inserted into the synagogue service.

When the day before Purim falls on Shabbat, as it does this year, the Fast of Esther is brought forward to the preceding Thursday (9 March this year). 



Purim

After sunset Saturday evening, 11 March, festive prayers will take place in synagogues, where the Book of Esther will also be read aloud. It is customary for people, especially children, to come to synagogue dressed in costume. During the reading of the Book of Esther, whenever Haman’s name is mentioned, congregants traditionally make as much noise as possible in order to drown out his name – a reflection of God’s promise (Exodus 17:14) to, “blot out,” the Amalekite nation, of which Haman was a descendant; special Purim noisemakers may be used for this purpose. The Book of Esther will be read again during morning prayers on Sunday, 12 March. A special Purim prayer is inserted into the daily prayers and the blessing after meals.

On Purim, Jews are enjoined by the Book of Esther (9:22) to send gifts of food to each other, make special contributions to the poor, and have a festive holiday meal in the afternoon. To this end, the day is also marked by collections for various charities, and by people visiting neighbors and friends to deliver baskets of food, prominent among which are small, three-cornered, fruit-filled pastries known as Oznei Haman in Hebrew (Haman’s ears) orHamantaschen in Yiddish (Haman’s pockets).

At the festive meal, some maintain the custom of becoming so inebriated that they cannot distinguish between, “Blessed is Mordechai,” (Esther’s uncle and the hero of the Book of Esther) and, “Cursed is Haman.”



Shushan Purim

In Jerusalem, Purim is ordinarily celebrated one day later than it is in the rest of the world; accordingly, all Purim-related observances are postponed by one day. This practice originates from the fact that an extra day was prescribed for the Jews of Shushan (the modern Susa, one of the Persian Empire's four capitals) to defend themselves against their enemies. This second day is known as Shushan Purim. As mentioned in the Book of Esther itself (9:16-19), Jews living in walled cities (later defined by rabbinical authorities to mean walled cities at the time that Joshua entered the Land of Israel) celebrate Purim one day later than Jews living in unwalled cities. There are several other such cities in Israel where Shushan Purim is celebrated. In some cities whose status is in doubt, the Book of Esther will actually be read on both days.



In many places in Israel, Purim is marked by special parades; the most famous of these takes place in Tel Aviv. Many kindergartens, schools, synagogues, and towns will also host special Purim parties and carnivals. 

 

 

Photo GPO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

The Israel Opera’s current production of Faust by Charles Gounod is an amalgam of grand opera and ballet that combines the best of both artistic worlds. The superb performances by vocalists and dancers alike take place against the backdrop of stunning scenery, whose staging employs high-tech hydraulics.


In this four-hour production of the opera in five acts -- a co-production of the Israel Opera with Teatro Regio Torino and Opera de Lausanne -- the choreography -- by visiting director Stefano Poda -- practically steals the show. The writhing, sensual movements of the souls in Hell are rendered all the more unforgettable by the near-total nudity of the lithe terpsichoreans.


Indeed, at the premiere performance of Faust on March 6, the audience’s enthusiastic ovations for the dancers rivaled those that regaled the singers. The dancers also received named credits in the program playbill.


The Opera Orchestra -- the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion -- conducted by Dan Ettinger, was in fine form in an augmented capacity, with two harpists and complete woodwind and percussion sections.  


The role of Faust was sung by tenor Gaston Rivera, while that of Mephistopholes was sung by bass Paolo Battaglia. Soprano Aurelia Florian excelled as Marguerite, and the breeches role of Marguerite’s suitor -- and Faust’s rival -- Siebel was sung by mezzo soprano Na’ama Goldmann.


The roles of all five major protagonists alternate each evening during the course of this stunning production, which runs through March 25.  

Faust

Conductor                                                                         Dan Ettinger

                                                                                           Ethan Schmeisser

Director, Designer and Choreographer                     Stefano Poda

Among the soloists:

Faust                                                                              Gaston Rivero

                                                                                        Rame Lahaj

Mephistopheles                                                       Paolo Battaglia

                                                                                    Petar Naydenov

Marguerite                                                              Aurelia Florian

                                                                                  Tamar Iveri

Siebel                                                                      Na’ama Goldman

                                                                                  Shahar Lavi

Valentin                                                                 Serban Vasile

                                                                                 Ilya Silchukov

Wagner                                                                 Noah Brieger

Martha                                                                   Edit Zamir

                                                                               Shay Bloch

The Israeli Opera Chorus

Chorus Master: Ethan Schmeisser

The Opera Orchestra - The Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion

Sung in French

English and Hebrew Surtitles

Translation: Israel Ouval

Duration: Three hours & 15 minutes

Co-production with Teatro Regio di Torino and Opera de Lausanne

Tickets Price

PREMIÈRE  210, 280, 345, 420, 470 NIS

SUN-FRI    190, 252, 319, 388, 438 NIS

SAT   207, 269, 334, 404, 453 NIS

The New Israeli Opera

Shaul Hamelekh Boulevard 19, Tel Aviv

Tel. (03) 692-7777

 

Website: http://www.israel-opera.co.il/eng/

 

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THE KARAMAZOVS 
Director: Petr Zelenka, Czech Republic, 2008, Czech with Hebrew subtitles, 100 min



9.3. at 21h | Cinematheque Tel Aviv, followed by Q&A with the actress Lenka Krobotova (Grushenka)
20.3. at 21:30h | 
Cinematheque Jerusalem



For the tickets contact your Cinematheque.A theatre company from Prague arrives in Cracow to present a stage adaptation of Dostoevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov at the city’s alternative drama festival. The production is to be staged in an unusual venue – the local steelworks. During rehearsals, the drama on stage spills over into real life, behind the scenes and front of house... In both his chosen theme and form, director Petr Zelenka has come up with an exceptional piece, oscillating between fiction and documentary and centred on the successful stage production presented by Prague’s Dejvice Theatre.


 
Petr Zelenka (b. 1967, Prague) is one of the Czech Republic’s most highly regarded screenwriters and directors. He studied scriptwriting and dramaturgy at FAMU (1991) and then worked as a script editor at Barrandov film studios. He wrote the script for the short Allenesque piece Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Sex but Were Afraid to Experience (1999, dir. Jan Hřebejk) and for the box-office hit comedy Loners (2000, dir. David Ondříček). In 1993 he directed the fictional feature-length documentary Padlock (Visací zámek 1982-2007), which he followed with the similarly conceived Mňága – Happy End (1996). He then made his award-winning feature debut Buttoners (1997 – Czech Lion for Best Czech Film, among others), Year of the Devil (2002 — Crystal Globe at the KVIFF) and an adaptation of his own stage play which won the prestigious Alfréd Radok prize, Wrong Side Up (2005).


 

Director:  Petr Zelenka
Screenplay: Petr Zelenka based on the novel The Brothers Karamazov by F.M. Dostoyevski and stage adaptation by Evald Schorm
Director of Photography: Alexander Šurkala
Music: Jan A.P. Kaczmarek
Editor: Vladimír Barák
Cast: Ivan Trojan, Igor Chmela, Martin Myšička, David Novotný, Lenka Krobotová, Michaela Badinková

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ambassador AndorNagy and Dr. Vera Kaplan,  Director of the Cummings Center

 

have the honour to invite you and your friends to the

“THE 1956 HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION AND THE INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT OF THE COLD WAR”

 

Conference

 

commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the 1956 Revolution

 

 

The Conference is sponsored by the 1956 Hungarian Revolution and Freedom Fight 60th Anniversary Memorial Board

 

14 March, 2017 (Tuesday) at 04.30 p.m. 

 

Gilman Building, Room 496, Tel Aviv University

 

(Ramat Aviv, Tel Aviv)

 The lectures will be held in English

 

Please RSVP by 10 March 2017

 

Free Entrance

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Program:

16:15-16:30             Coffee and Refreshments

16:30-16:50              Opening remarks

Ambassador Andor Nagy, Embassy of Hungary

Dr. Vera Kaplan, Director, Cummings Center

16:50-18:00              Conference Chair                          

Dr. Boris Morozov

16:50-17:10              Associate Professor Tamás Magyarics: The International Context of the Hungarian revolution

17:15-17:35             Dr. Raphael Vago, Senior Lecturer: The Hungarian Revolution, Israel and the Suez Crisis

17:35-18:00              Assistant Research Fellow Gábor Megadja: A down-to-earth Revolution? The non-ideological character of 1956 

18:00-18:30             Questions and remarks

Moderator Dr. Boris Morozov

18:30                        Closing remarks

                                 Dr. Boris Morozov

                                 Ambassador Andor Nagy

18:45                       Buffet Reception

 

 

Amb. Tamás Magyarics, Ph. D. is as Associate Professor at the School of English and American Studies, ELTE, Budapest, and a Senior Research Fellow at the Budapest Centerfor American Studies at the National University for Public Service. He served as Ambassador to Ireland in 2011-2015, and was the Head of the North American Department at theHungarian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade in 2015-2016. He was a Senior Research Fellow, then the Director of the Hungarian Institute for International Affairs between2000 and 2011. While working at the HIIA, he was the editor-in-chief of the Külügyi Szemle and the Foreign Policy Review. He has been teaching at ELTE, Budapest since 1987,and was a Guest Professor at the UCSB, the IES in Vienna besides various Hungarian universities. His fields of interest include the history of the Cold War, with specialreference to the US-Central European relations, the history of US foreign affairs, Great Britain’s policies towards Central Europe in the 20th century, and the theory of internationalrelations. He has written and edited ten books on these topics, and authored some 200 articles in peer reviewed and other journals in Hungary and abroad.

 

Dr. Boris Morozov – graduated from the Historical Faculty of Moscow State University, where in 1983 received Ph.D in History for the dissertation " The Establishment of a State Apparatus in 1917-18: The Case of the People’s Commissariat of Railroads". From 1978  until 1984 worked in the Institute of Documental Research and Archives (in the Central Soviet Archives) and from 1984 until 1991 – in Academy of Labor and Social Relations. In 1991 emigrated to Israel, since 1991 works in Tel Aviv University. Specializes in the problems of Jewish emigration and history of Russian-Israeli relations. Expert on the methodology of work with Russian archival documents. Author and editor of books: The Formation of the Bodies of the Central Government of Soviet Russia in 1917-1918, (in Russian), Progress-Academiia, Moscow, 1995; Jewish Emigration in the Light of New Documents, (in Russian), Ivrus, Tel Aviv, 1998; Documents on Soviet Jewish Emigration (London, Frank Cass Publishers, 1999); (with Ziva Galili) Exiled to Palestine: The Emigration of Soviet Zionist Convicts, 1924-1934, Routledge, London, 2006; (with Yaacov Ro'i) The Soviet Union and the June 1967 Six Day War (Washington, Stanford University Press, 2008), etc. and numerous articles. Now works on the book re history of Bahais in Russia, monitors Antisemitism in Russian Press and collects material for the research on the Structure of Power in contemporary Russia.

  

 

Dr. Raphael Vago is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Fellow,  Department of History, Cummings Center for Russian and East European Studies and the Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry, Tel-Aviv University

Main areas of teaching and research, Modern History of Central and Eastern Europe, especially topics related to the modern history of Hungary and Romania, modern Anti-Semitism, Holocaust and Holocaust Denial, nationalism, minorities, ethnicity – present and historical perspective, post-communist systems, European integration and Minorities in the new Europe

Author of the yearly chapters since 1993 related to Anti-Semitism in Eastern/Central Europe in the yearly editions of Antisemitism Worlwide published by Tel-Aviv University, member of several Academic and Public committees of projects and research centers on the history of the Jews in Romania and Hungary. Member of the International Commission of Historians on the Holocaust in Romania, "The Elie Wiesel Commission". Numerous public and media appearances related to the Commission's findings.

 

 

Gábor Megadja is an Assistant Research Fellow at the Thomas Molnar Institute for Advanced Studies, Budapest and also a Leading Researcher at Századvég Foundation. He has an MA in Sociology and History. He has completed his PhD and his thesis will be presented for defense at the Eötvös Loránd University Faculty of Law, Department of Political Science is Spring 2017. He served as a political adviser to the Minister at the Ministry of Public Administration and Justice between 2010 and 2014. His main field of interest is the History of Ideas and he has several publications in peer reviewed and other journals and periodicals mainly about Leo Strauss, Hannah Arendt, Eric Voegelin, and others. He has published a book with the title The Hegemony of Utopia (2015) and his second one will be published probably later this year (Escape from Modernity).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embassy of Japan in cooperation with the Israel Japan Friendship Society  Friday Lecture:

 

The 65th Anniversary of the Diplomatic Relations between Japan and Israel

 

 the Days in Japan as an Israeli Ambassador

 

 

This year 2017 marks the 65th anniversary of the establishment of the diplomatic relations of Japan and the State of Israel. Commemorating this year, we would like to hear the stories about hidden gems of our 2 countries relations. The speaker of the Friday Lecture will be Mr. Eli Cohen, former Ambassador of Israel to Japan, and he will share with us stories of his mission as the Israeli Ambassador in the years 2004~2007

 

How was he appointed as Ambassador of Israel to Japan? (The first ambassador to Japan not from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but nominated by the Foreign Minister and the Prime Minister), How to use personal knowledge and advantages for a successful mission?

 

Visit of Mr. Junichiro Koizumi, Prime Minister of Japan to Israel: the story behind the curtains, Visit of Sumo wrestlers (Sadogatakebeya) to Israel , Lectures given to the priests of Isse Shrine, Koyasan temple, and others anecdotes and stories from the life of an Ambassador in Japan.

Number of seats is limited. 

Registration by this link ONLY:  https://goo.gl/forms/bJotYMFTUyQfhFem1

 
 


Friday, March 10, 2017 at 11:00  | The Museum Tower,  19th floor 4 Berkowitz St., Tel Aviv

 

 

 

 

 

 

KKL-JNF Israel, JNF-USA, Ammunition Hill National Heritage and Memorial site in Jerusalem, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Tourism, Ministry of Jerusalem and Heritage affairs,

GPO and with the support of HP (Scitex and Indigo) and PICO Venture Partners invites all photographers of Jerusalem to join to an historic photo challenge in the spirit of worldwide cooperation

International Photo Challenge of Jerusalem - JerusaLENS

 Hosted by: GuruShots , Feb-March 19, 2017

www.gurushots.com/jerusalem

Any photo, any time, from any angle - show “your Jerusalem” to the world

Share it on # JerusaLENS (subject to regulations)

 

  

  

 

First row: (from the left) Courtesy of Rina Castelnuovo from the curators’ team, Celebrations of the National Institutions building plaza in 1947 from KKL-JNF Photo Archive, From a South Africa national Susan Arnold

Second row: (from the left) Israel/David Oppenheim, Israel/Thehuya Vogel, Italy/Giuseppe Fallica

We are making history by gathering and ranking the largest collection of Jerusalem photos ever.

A total of $10,000 in cash prizes for the first four winners!

Tell a Friend, tag #JerusaLENS

 

What Israeli leaders are saying about the challenge?

Israeli President Reuven (Rubi) Rivlin: "Jerusalem tells the story of the world, I urge you all to join the challenge, and upload unique photographs of our beloved Jerusalem.

Artistic and aesthetic photographs - especially photographs with a message of unity, which gives personal and emotional expression to our common denominator called Jerusalem."

Jerusalem and Heritage Minister Mr. Ze'ev Elkin: "Our aim in this photo challenge is to uncover forgotten memories and get an exciting encounter of Jerusalem’s history in a frame.

As the Minister of Jerusalem and Heritage affairs for Israel, I hope to see unity and beauty through your personal camera lens. From here on out, it is in your hands. "

Tourism Minister Mr. Yariv Levin: "The Jerusalem Photo Challenge is a great opportunity to expose Jerusalem's multiple beautiful faces. I call on everyone to take photos, upload and vote."

KKL Chairman Mr. Danny Atar: "Jerusalem is the capital of the Jewish people from the First Temple until today. For 115 years the Keren Kayemet Leisrael – JNF works to strengthen Jerusalem,

cultivation of its land and strengthen its global status. We are pleased to share photos from the JNF's archives with the JerusaLENS photo challenge, and allow the public to enjoy the beauty of the city, its culture and its people."

 

 

 

JerusaLENS Timeline

The first phase of the Challenge (until Feb 28th, 2017) everyone is welcome to upload their photos of the city, from any period, in any subject to show the many faces of Jerusalem (subject to the terms of GuruShots(.

The second phase (from March 1st until March 19, 2017) everyone is invited to vote for the most beautiful and exciting photos. 
Prizes
A total of $10,000 in prizes will be split between the 4 top ranked photos by categories (Best photographer, best picture, and the Guru selection). 

First place in the ‘Younger’ (Instagram) photography challenge will win another $500. All prizes are courtesy of JNF-USA.

100 from the top 400 ranked photos will be chosen by curators' team to be shown in an exciting and unique exhibition to be open in spring 2017 at Ammunition Hill in Jerusalem, and later on in other places around the globe.

GuruShots, is an online gaming platform for photographers that are fun, social and educational. Whether you are a budding hobbyist or a seasoned professional, GuruShots™ offers photographers a fresh and captivating way

 

to share their passion, talent and insight with fellow enthusiasts from across the globe. World's greatest live photo challenges.

Challenge Mentor David Rubinger

Challenge Curators: Rina Castelnuovo, Ziv Koren, Gally Tibon, They will be led by Avi Ohayon.

Entrepreneur and Manager: Alon Wald, Head of Operations, Ammunition Hill, Jerusalem

 

Photos

 

 1- Rami Wald RIP  fell in the Ammunition Hill batle and his infantil son .Alon ( today Head of Operations ,Ammunition Hill, Jerusalem 

 

2- President Rivlin historic photo  

 

 3-  Hebrew Music Museum hpoto by Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 
Ramy Wald RIP fell in the ammunition hill battle and his infant son.j

Ramy Wald RIP fell in the ammunition hill battle and his infant son.j

Ramy Wald RIP fell in the ammunition hill battle and his infant son.j

Ramy Wald RIP fell in the ammunition hill battle and his infant son.j

 

 

 

 

 

In Georgian times, Britain offered its population a wide range of entertainment. In London and the provinces, purpose-built auditoriums were built for the performance of plays and music (it was a time of much theatre music), with London’s Drury Lane, Covent Garden and Haymarket theatres, each seating several thousand people, abuzz nightly. Audiences included people of means seated in the boxes, with poorer people squeezed into hot and dirty galleries. Audience behaviour there was generally unruly.

The ostentatious pleasure gardens became a special feature of the London entertainment scene: at the Ranelagh Gardens, boasting sweeping avenues, a Chinese Pavilion and a fountain of mirrors, concerts were held in the 200-foot-wide Rotunda. It is known that 12,000 people flocked to the Vauxhall Gardens to watch Händel rehearse his “Fireworks Music” in 1749. By the second half of the 18th century, there were many spas and over 60 fashionable pleasure gardens in London as well as in a number in provincial towns, modelled on those of London.

The public was also drawn to riding the new hot air balloons, the many fairs, exhibitions and to the viewing of a variety of strange beings and events. The latter included giants, midgets, the obese, unfortunate and the strange people, imported exotic animals, animal baiting and cock-fighting, not to speak of such curiosities such as the famous “performing pig” with its ability to spell and trained bees and birds, but also visits to view the inmates at London’s hospital for the insane – “Bethlehem”! “Passion and Madness”, one of Ensemble PHOENIX’s most fascinating and more theatrical programs, presented stories and music – mad songs and instrumental – inspired by the goings-on in the Bethlehem Hospital and the public’s fascination with them.

 

Once again, Ensemble PHOENIX is about to turn its focus to Georgian London, a period of unprecedented prosperity and of culture then becoming available to a wider cross-section of the public, in particular, the new middle class – successful merchants, traders, craftsmen and professionals. “Glamour and Fashion: London in the 18th Century” will present audiences with fine instrumental music from London’s cosmopolitan musical scene of the second half of the 18th century, its vibrant events enhanced by the arrival of such colourful figures as Felice Giardini, Johann Christian Bach and Carl Friedrich Abel and by the influx of such outstanding foreign musicians as Haydn and Stamitz. Audiences will have the opportunity of hearing works of composers popular in their lifetime but not frequently enough heard on today’s concert platforms. Artists performing in this program will be Moshe Aron Epstein-Classical flute, Lilia Slavny-violin, Marina Minkin-harpsichord and PHOENIX founder Myrna Herzog-direction, cello.

 

Sat. 04 March at 20:30
Haifa, The Studio, Beit Hecht, 142 HaNassi St., Carmel Center
Reservations: 04 836-3804

 

Sun. 05 March at 20:00
Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies, Mormon University, Mt. Scopus, Jerusalem
Tel: 03-6265621, concert details: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Thu. 09 March at 20:30
The PHOENIX Salon, Raanana
Reservations: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Sat. 08 April 2017 at 11:00 (Rachel Ringelstein-violin)
The Eden-Tamir Music Center, Ein Kerem, Jerusalem
Reservations: 02-641-4250

 

Photo:Eliahu Feldman

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

 

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

The Israel Camerata Jerusalem hosted conductor Reinhard Goebel (Germany) and bass baritone Raimund Nolte (Germany) in a concert focusing on “The Bach Dynasty”. This writer attended the event in the Henry Crown Auditorium of the Jerusalem Theatre on February 14th, 2017. The program featured works by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) and those of four of his sons.

 

The concert opened with music of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (1710-1784), Bach’s second child (from his first wife, Maria Barbara) and eldest son.  Sinfonia in D-major F.64 is a secular piece which was, however, probably used as the overture to his Pentecost cantata “Dies ist der Tag, da Jesu Leidenskraft” from the time Wilhelm Friedemann was music director and church organist at the Church of Our Lady in Halle as of 1746.  Performed in the standard orchestral setting of the style straddling the Baroque and Classical styles - strings and woodwinds (here, not on period instruments), with the presence of the harpsichord playing thorough bass and supported by the ‘cellos - Goebel gave the work a hearty reading, presenting its many fetching, user-friendly melodies, its warmth and energy and its fine woodwind scoring, especially in the second movement, in which the flutes (Esti Rofé, Avner Geiger) featured in tandem. Much of Wilhelm Friedemann’s oeuvre has been destroyed or lost and more the pity. His bold, original and innovative music deserves a more prominent place on today’s concert platforms.

 

Then to J.S.Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.3, written possibly when Bach was in Weimar, a work showing Bach’s predilection for the Italian concerto and its characteristic fullness of sound. Scored for strings and harpsichord (with bass), the way the work is written leaves the conductor to decide who the soloists really are to be in any one concert and Goebel’s decision may have surprised some members of the audience: with the rapid (at times breakneck) tempi he chose, it seems that all players, ‘cellos included of course, were involved in virtuosic performance, the listener hastily casting his eyes from one instrument or section to another as each the orchestra’s fine players took up the solo challenge and most effectively. It was a performance of breathless excitement. As to the Phrygian half cadence - two chords in all – making up the second movement, Goebel leaves them “au naturel”, bare of the improvised violin flourishes often heard adorning them.

 

We then heard “Pygmalion”, a cantata for bass and orchestra by Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach (1732-1795), J.S.Bach’s fifth son and sixteenth child (one of the six surviving children of the thirteen born to Anna Magdalena Bach) and often referred to as “the Bückeburg Bach”: Friedrich Bach spent his entire professional life as concertmaster of the Schaumburg-Lippe court in Bückeburg. A secular cantata to a text of Berlin poet Carl Wilhelm Ramler, “Pygmalion” represents the monodrama genre of the short-lived 18th century melodrama style. It tells of Pygmalion, a Cypriot sculptor who carves a woman out of ivory and falls in love with her. After making offerings at Aphrodite’s altar, the sculpture becomes alive and the sculptor marries her. Considering Friedrich Bach’s somewhat unfortunate reputation for being a bourgeois personality and a lesser composer than his three very famous brothers, it must be said that this finely crafted music reflects the strongest traits of his great siblings. The music for “Pygmalion” is indeed substantial and most graceful, the ample recitatives presenting the content of Ramler’s text with effectiveness and potency. Raimund Nolte’s voice is warm and bright in all registers, both powerful and compassionate, his singing easeful, articulate and clean. Highlighting key words and the various feelings emerging along the work’s emotional course, his performance, both tender and dramatic, was involving, expressive and convincing as he kept keen eye contact with his audience, his facial expression giving meaning to the text. Played elegantly, instrumental passages threw light on the agenda of each moment. Had a World War II airstrike not wiped out the library housing J.C.F.Bach’s manuscript collection, we might be hearing more of this composer’s works in today’s concert halls.

 

Johann Christian Bach (1735-1782), the “London” Bach, was J.S.Bach’s eleventh and youngest son.  In 1762, he took up the position of composer to the King’s Theatre in London, for which he wrote a number of operas. He also wrote orchestral-, chamber- and keyboard music and some cantatas. In 1764, he established his fashionable London concert series together with viol player Karl Friedrich Abel. Employed as music master to Queen Charlotte and her children brought him both financial gain and social connections. Symphony opus 6 No.6 was published in 1770. Its fiery Sturm und Drang style is right down Reinhard Goebel’s alley as he led the players through the dazzling, dramatic string tremolandi and sforzati of the opening movement (contrasting them with intimate moments) and into the restless urgency of the third movement. The Andante piu tosto adagio (second movement) for strings alone was poignant and finely tempered.

 

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach (1714-1788), J.S.Bach’s fifth child and second son, a composer more-or-less leaning towards the Empfindsamkeit (sensitive) style, was a free spirit in his composing, as he was in life.  With audiences of the time judging a work by its degree of novelty, those of C.P.E. Bach ticked all the boxes! Symphony in D-major Wq.176 (H.651), the final work heard in the Camerata concert, was one of the early symphonies composed some time from 1755 to 1758 in Berlin. Under Goebel’s baton, the concise symphony, complete with the composer’s unconventional signature surprise moments, sudden contrasts and joie-de-vivre, moved seamlessly through the movements with buoyant vigour and vividly coloured orchestral playing, to be gone with the wink of an eye.

 

Musicologist, violinist and conductor Reinhard Goebel (b.1952) has specialized in early music on period instruments. In 1973, he established Musica Antiqua Köln. He has researched and revived interest in music of Johann David Heinichen, Schmelzer, Biber and members of the Bach family.

For several years, Raimund Nolte was a violist with Musica Antiqua Köln. In his opera career, he has appeared in numerous opera houses in Germany, Austria, Strasbourg and France. As a concert soloist, he works with major conductors, also appearing in leading European festivals. His recordings range from music of Bach to that of Bernstein.

 

Photo: Maestro Reinhard Goebel. Photo: Christina Bleier

 

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The Austrian Cultural Forum proudly presents the second edition of the “Austrian Film Week” in Israel featuring six recent movies in original version with English and Hebrew subtitles.

 

The opening will take place on 18 February 2017 at Tel Aviv Cinematheque.

 

 

"  I welcome you to the second edition of the Austrian film week in Israel which brings recent cinematographic works to Israel in order to promote the great Austrian movie scene.

Again this year, six recent Austrian movies, including two Israel premieres, in original version with English and Hebrew subtitles will be screened.

The screenings will take place in six cinemathques across the country.

 

The movie selection is very diverse.

The opening film at Tel Aviv Cinematheque will be “Love Maybe” by Austrian director Michael Kreihsl.

The movie talks about citizens of Vienna who encounter a variety of fates as a result of their difficulties in communicating with each other. A series of incidents, some lucky and some unlucky, brings these people together.

 

Three interwoven stories are also at core of the movie “Bad Luck” by director Thomas Woschitz where wrong decisions, chance and the search for happiness are leading the storyline.

“Stefan Zweig : Farewell to Europe” addresses the years of exile in the life of this famous Jewish Austrian writer and was the Austrian entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 89th Academy Awards.

“Kuma” by director Umut Dağ on the other hand touches upon deep rooted societal traditionstransported from far to Vienna. In addition to the feature films, two documentaries will be screened.

 

“Safari” by director Ulrich Seidl and “A German Life” featuring Brunhilde Pomsel, former secretary, stenographer and typist of Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels, mirroring the major historical ruptures of the 20th century and German life thereafter.

You can also look forward to our guests who will discuss with you their films right after the screenings.

 

I would like to thank the cinematheques, the filmmakers and of course the many people interested in our screenings for their commitment to Austrian culture and Austrian movies in particular. Without them, this film week would not have been possible.

In addition, I would like to thank my team for the tireless work in preparing and supporting this project. I very much hope that you will enjoy the movies.

 

Johannes Strasser Director of the Austrian Cultural Forum Tel Aviv

 

Programme: http://bit.ly/2layeDs

 

The whole program: https://www.bmeia.gv.at/fileadmin/user_upload/Vertretungen/KF_Tel_Aviv/Dokumente/Brochure_Austrian_Film_Week_2017_final.pdf

 

The link to the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fU_qddpk-T0&feature=share

 

https://www.facebook.com/AustrianCulturalForumTelAviv/

 

 www.bmeia.gv.at/telavivkf

 

 

 

 

The 2017 Eilat Chamber Music Festival took place from February 1st to 4th. It was hosted by the Dan Eilat Hotel, with concerts taking place in the hotel’s Tarshish Hall and the Big Blue Hall. As befits a festival, the Eilat performances offered some programs that were very different to mainstream concert fare. One of the most unique and significant concerts was Israeli pianist Amir Katz’ “Hommage an Liszt”, a complete recital of Liszt Études. In his program notes, Katz reminds the listener that these pieces “represent the peak of writing for piano of the Romantic period”.

 

Katz takes the listener into the world of Liszt Études with the much-loved “Liebestraum” (Dream of Love) No.3, Liszt’s setting of Ferdinand Freilgrath’s impassioned “O lieb’, so lang du lieben kannst” (Oh love, as long as you can love). Known for its singing melody and delicacy, Amir Katz, chose some daring pedalling, orchestrating the nocturne’s demanding sequences with its network of “undercurrents”, its farewell leaving the listener once more in the mystery of his own musings. Then to “Trois études de concert” (1845-1849), suitably referred to by his Paris publisher as “caprices poétiques”. From “Il lamento” (The Lament), in which Katz fires the imagination with the drama inherent in tonal processes, in dissonances melting into harmonic tranquillity, with imposing utterances juxtaposed with fragility, he moves into “La Leggierezza” (Lightness), floating its weightless intricacy, presenting its intensity, his deft, splendidly clean fingerwork taking one back to the gossamer textures of lightness. No less rewarding was his performance of the Impressionistically-hued “Un sospiro” (A Sigh), its huge technical demands (dramatic and theatrical effects in Liszt’s own performances) in no way hampering Katz’ silken melodic lines and the shimmering, flowing arpeggios.

 

Then to the “Zwei Konzertetüden” (1862-1863) composed by Liszt in Rome, with Katz’ playing of “Waldesrauschen” (Forest Murmurs) richly poetic and abundant in nature associations, followed by the playful, imaginative portrayal of “Gnomenreigen” (Dance of the Gnomes), Katz directing the listener’s attention to the piece’s impish, hopping, good-natured whimsy rather than to the fact that this is one of Liszt’s most difficult piano pieces!

 

The second part of the program consisted of Franz Liszt’s “Transcendental Études”, a work begun when the composer was in his teens with its final version published in 1852, when the composer was 41. One of the most challenging piano works of the Romantic repertoire, Schumann viewed the 1838 version of it as “studies in storm and dread for, at the most, ten or twelve players in the world.” In his program notes, Katz, offering the audience the rare opportunity of hearing the work in its entirety, writes that, in his opinion, “transcendental” refers to the work’s “philosophical aspect rather than to the technical side.” Opening with the momentary but uncompromisingly energetic “Preludio”, Katz invites his listeners to join him on a journey of vivid pianistic performance and intense emotions. A kaleidoscope of piano techniques, of the timbres created by textures and registers, of programmatic content (“Mazeppa”, for example) or visual associations, Katz’ warmth of tone and spontaneity, served by his unfaltering technique, gave the pieces an air of freshness, of endless discovery. And beauty of melody is high up on his list of priorities. Creating contrasts between pieces of high drama and massive textures, Katz’ signature tenderness and sensibility was woven into the flowing tranquillity of “Paysage” (Landscape), the subdued swirling and strangely dissonant “Feux Follets” (Will-o-the Wisps), or the personal expression of nostalgia and delicate, ornamented old-world sentiments of “Ricordanza” (Remembrance).

 

The Liszt recital is indeed a major milestone in Amir Katz’ career.  The “12 Études d’éxécution transcendante” constitute a large, all-encompassing slice of life. In presenting them, Katz offers his audience a ravishing array of colours and dynamics in playing that is compelling and frequently stormy but never overblown or opaque. And his interpretation of Liszt is refreshingly devoid of egoism. In Amir Katz’ own words: “Performing the Études as a cycle is a captivating and rigorous autobiographical journey for both listener and performer.”

 

Photo: Maxim Reider

 

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 Pasión Latina  Celebrating 100 years of the birth of Alberto Ginastera  Spanish songs and Argentine dances

 

Spanish songs and Argentine dances

Gisele Ben-Dor, Conductor

Virginia Tola (Argentina), Soprano

Aquiles Machado (Venezuela), Tenor

 

De Falla Seven Popular Spanish Songs

Various composers  Arias and Duets from Zarzuelas

Ginastera  "Estancia", Op.8, complete, with narration and singing, Israel Premier

 

 

 

 

Feb. 8th and 9th, Wednesday and Thursday, 20:30

Tel-Aviv Museum of Art, Recanati Auditorium,

27 Shaul Ha Melech Blvd

 

For tickets please
 
 

tickets.ico.co.il

 or call
 
 
 
call 03-518-8846  
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 A Brown Folder – Homage to Felix Bloch

Curator: Ruthy Lubin

27. 1. - 28. 2. 2017: Gallery On The Fence, 23 Zeitlin, Tel Aviv

 


“During my visit to “Beit Theresienstadt”, my eyes were caught by a harrowing work of the artist Felix (Ferdinand) Bloch. The picture he drew in 1943, about a year before he was tortured to death, depicts daily life in the ghetto. Felix Bloch, a graphic designer by profession, described symbolically through an impressive sketching technique an episode of chaotic life that had taken place between the ghetto walls. What caught my attention, and to a great extent gave dramatic meaning to the whole picture, was the format Felix Bloch has chosen for his work.
This choice, of course, was not question of his preference but rather stemmed from complete lack of choices. Felix Bloch, who worked at the “Drawing Office” of the Technical Department in ghetto Theresienstadt, simply used an old brown cardboard folder, this was the only “paper” he had. In secret he sketched a visual text, silent testimony, depicting the horrors he had to go through in Theresienstadt. His drawings, later on, served as an evidence during the trials of the Nazis.
 

                                                                                                           
Many artists from Israel and from abroad, such as Shalom Neuman, Rafi Baler, Doron Polak, Esther Beer Percal, Tamar Hirschl, Oshrat Bentor, Bracha Guy, Miriam Shalev, Lea Dolinsky or Edna Elstein
have paid, by their artistic expression, a tribute to Felix Bloch. The only thing they should respect was the basic material – brown cardboard folder. By using various techniques such as print, photography, drawing, collage, readymade, etching, relief, working in oil and acrylic they created a very impressive exhibition arousing memories and pains. Moreover, they honored, in their special way, this gifted artist who perished in the holocaust. This exhibition helped to fulfill the genuine intention of Bloch’s work, i.e. to show to the entire world the real face of the Ghetto.”
Ruthy Lubin
 
Felix (Ferdinand, Friedrich) Bloch was born on August 8, 1898 in Koenigswart (Kynžvart in Czech), Czechoslovakia. Before the war he worked as a graphic designer in Vienna, then in 1938 he emigrated to Milan, Italy, but in the end returned back to Prague. There he worked for the Jewish community teaching classes about graphics of propaganda. On July 30, 1942 he was deported with the transport Aav to Ghetto Theresienstadt where he joined the drawing office at the Technical Department. As many other artists he was drawing in secret, mostly trying to document the daily life in the Ghetto. On July 17, 1944 he was arrested together with a few other artists, transferred to Small Fortress Prison and blamed for „atrocity propaganda“. In reality the artists did try to smuggle their works out of the ghetto but unluckily were caught. Bloch was cruelly tortured and died in the prison on October 31, 1944.
 

 

The Beit Theresienstadt Museum, Kibbutz Givat Chaim Ichud, Emek Chefer was established by an association of survivors of the Ghetto Theresienstadt. The exhibitions are based on documentary material from the Ghetto preserved in its archives. There is also a very active Education Center that tells, in many various ways, the story of Ghetto Theresienstadt to the public.
 

 
The exhibition is a contribution to the International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The original works will be presented in September 2017 in The Ghetto Museum of Terezin Memorial in the Czech Republic.
 
Photo Courtesie Czech Centre Tel Aviv
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

The 2017 Eilat Chamber Music Festival will take place from February 1st to 4th at the Dan Eilat Hotel. To all intents and purposes, the hotel’s Tarshish Hall and the Big Blue Hall will serve as concert halls for the duration of the festival. At the press conference held at the Dan Hotel

Tel Aviv on January 12th, those attending were offered a glimpse into the captivating program awaiting festival-goers. Speaking at the meeting, Eilat mayor Mr. Meir Yitzhak Halevi, CEO of the Dan Hotel chain Mr. Raffi Sadeh and festival founder and musical director Mr. Leonid Rozenberg made mention of developments regarding the festival, in the city of Eilat and of the contribution the Dan Hotels make to the success of the Eilat Chamber Music Festival. Ms. Hayuta Dvir, known to many as a presenter on Israeli radio, especially of the Monday afternoon Etnachta concert series at the Jerusalem Theatre, spoke of the warm cooperation between all who make the festival a reality and of the value of its educational programs: from January 29th to February 4th, serious young string players, pianists and trumpeters will be studying with some of the festival artists, a stepping-stone to furthering their musicianship and technical skills. In another educational program – the Vienna Tel Aviv Vocal Connection – sopranos Sylvia Greenberg (Vienna Conservatory, Munich Hochschule) and Rosemarie Danziger (Cornell University, Mannheim Faculty) and pianist David Aronson (assistant conductor Vienna State Opera, Vienna Conservatory) will coach young singers who are aiming for a professional career.

 

 

 

 

An extra dimension to this year’s Eilat Chamber Music Festival will be an exhibition of artwork by Nevo Afek, an almost-blind, high-functioning autistic young man. Merav Afek, Nevo’s mother spoke of the artistic talent Nevo has displayed and of the young artist’s aim - to inspire people with his artworks.

 

With the rich choice of splendid concerts, festival-goers are going to have a hard time choosing which to attend…or perhaps which not! Pianist and conductor David Greilsammer will be back with his orchestra – the Geneva Camerata – this year to be joined by the great Russian-born violinist Viktoria Mullova. Greilsammer and the Geneva Camerata will present the Israeli premiere of Swiss composer Martin Jaggi’s “Uruk”. From France, the young, prize-winning Van Kuijk Quartet will perform French music and Schubert and will introduce the audience to Japanese composer Akira Nishimura’s string quartet “Pulses of Light”, then to be joined by Israeli pianist Amir Katz to perform César Franck’s Piano Quintet in F-minor. A treat in store for Baroque aficionados will be the Gabrieli Consort & Players, with their musical director and conductor Paul McCreesh; British soprano Gillian Webster will solo with them in Händel’s magnificent Italian cantata “Donna, che in ciel di tanta luce splendi”, written to celebrate the deliverance of Rome from the earthquake of 1703. And with the festival moving “outside the box” for Concert No.19, the Geneva Camerata will be joined by French jazz pianist Jacky Terrasson in a concert combining classical works, jazz and Israeli composer Jonathan Keren’s Variations on Gershwin’s “I Got Plenty of Nuttin”.

 

No new face to the Eilat Chamber Music Festival, pianist Amir Katz, in a daring and challenging program, will take the listener with him into the beauty and intricacies of Liszt’s music. 28-year-old Italian pianist Federico Colli will perform works of Domenico Scarlatti and Beethoven and, on his first Israeli visit, 15-year-old Alexander Malofeev from Russia will give a recital of mainstream works, with some piano repertoire discoveries.

 

Chamber music concerts will feature such world-renowned artists as violinists Marianna Vasileva (Israel/Russia) and Grigory Kalinovsky (USA), violist Mikhail Bereznitsky (Russia/Montenegro), ‘cellists Hillel Zori (Israel) and Martti Rousi (Finland) pianists Rena Shereshevskaya (Russia) and David Aronson (USA). 

 

Festival audiences will welcome back Canadian jazz trumpeter Jens Lindemann; in two exhilarating concerts, he will be performing with Israeli- and overseas jazz artists: keyboard player Kristian Alexandrov (Bulgaria/Canada), bassist Jeremy Coates (Canada), Israeli percussionist Gilad Dobrecki and pianist Guy Mintus, an Israeli boundary-crossing pianist, composer and educator living in New York.

 

And to an upbeat, uniquely Israeli and entertaining event: in a concert of new arrangements of several of his songs, Israeli songwriter Alon Olearchik (voice, piano, guitar) will be joined by violinist Yulia Klein, violist Daniel Tanchelson and Yoed Nir (‘cello).  Olearchik’s natural and communicative manner and humour make it a pleasure (and a must) to follow every word of his lyrics, to smile and to remember with nostalgia what was…or what might have been.

 

 

 

 

And for the children and us adults who treasure the memory of childhood, clown and actor Fyodor Makarov will present much fun and information in “SchMozart” (Concert No.9). Singers of the Vienna-Tel Aviv Vocal Connection, sopranos Avigail Gurtler Har-Tuv and Roxana Mihai, baritone Robson Bueno Tavared and instrumentalists will provide plenty of fine music by W.A.Mozart.

 

Photos  :

1- Fyodor Makarov (photo courtesy the Eilat Chamber Music Festival) 

2-  by Andy Gabrieli Staples

3- by Sivan Farag

 

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The Israel Opera’s current production of Lucia di Lammermoor, by the 19th century composer Gaetano Donizetti, is a real treat for opera lovers, thanks in large part to the bravura performances of the work’s signature arias: the sextet at the end of Act 2, and Lucia’s “Mad Scene” in Act 3.

 


The role of Lucia was sung at the January 17th premiere in Tel Aviv by the renowned Spanish soprano Maria Jose Moreno, who was making her Israeli debut after having performed in the leading opera houses of Europe. Moreno’s superlative rendition of the famous aria “Il dolce suono” -- combining vocal mastery with acting virtuosity -- had the audience spellbound, and earned the artist sustained applause long before the final curtain calls.

 


The two female flautists who participated in the unique counterpoint of the cadenza with Moreno were also outstanding. Noteworthy as well, albeit in a lesser role, was the impressive tenor Guy Mannheim, as Normano.

 

 

 
 

The staging was remarkable in its own right: reflecting the somber nature of the plot, black was the predominant color -- in both the scenery and costuming -- giving the effect of watching a production in black-and-white (Lucia was the sole person on stage clad in white). When color was introduced, it was, rather appropriately, blood-red.

 


The role of Lucia alternates between the visiting Moreno and Israel’s own Hila Baggio. Lucia di Lammermoor runs at the the Israel Opera House through February 3, 2017.

 

 

 

http://www.israel-opera.co.il/eng/

 

The Opera House


19 Shaul Hamelech Boulevard


Tel Aviv 61332


Tel: +972-3-692-7777

Fax: +972-3-692-7733

 

 Photos ;   Yossi Zwecker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

Two outstanding organizations were represented at the gala benefit concert for the Yad Elie Foundation, which took place at the Jerusalem International YMCA on January 1st, 2016.  The musical program was provided by Chen Zimbalista and the Music Factory.

Yad Eli, established by Marion Kunstenaar in 2002 in memory of Elie Saghroun, provides meals for needy Jerusalem school children, feeding 500 Arab- and Jewish children on a daily basis. It sets up educational programs to teach children about nutrition and health, creating a forum where Jewish and Arab participants can think, work and benefit from each other. Rabbi David Lilienthal serves as chairman of Yad Elie.

 

Directed by world-renowned marimba player and percussionist Chen Zimbalista, the Jewish-Arab youth orchestra – the Music Factory – was established four years ago. For the Jerusalem concert, it was joined by members of the Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra, the Israel Beer Sheva Sinfonietta and mezzo-soprano Noa Hope. The concert was preceded by the three-day Music in Omer Festival, consisting of open rehearsals, master classes and concerts. Taking place at the Open Museum in the Industrial Park of the southern town of Omer, this was the second of its kind involving the Music Factory and run by the charismatic Zimbalista. With the high standards of performance and nurturing of Zimbalista, an educator and social activist for bringing together children and youth from city and periphery in high-quality music-making, the 12- to 18-year-olds attending the festival were instructed by renowned teachers, who then joined them to play together in the youth orchestra.

 

The program included finely-crafted orchestral playing of movements from cardinal works of symphonic repertoire and some chamber pieces, these punctuated by Zimbalista’s dashing, stylish and virtuosic marimba playing. For the performance of works of J.S.Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Bizet, Ravel and Piazzolla, the role of concertmaster alternated between some of the orchestra’s outstanding teen violinists. Introducing Ravel’s “Bolero”, Zimbalista explained that the composer had written it as an exercise for orchestra. With Zimbalista on drum, the players gave a beguiling reading of Evgeny Levitas’ shortened version of the “Bolero”; among the fine small solos, a very young boy – Negev Almog -  gave a richly sonorous and most impressive performance of the flute solo.

 

Of the chamber works on the program, we heard ‘cellists (and Music Factory tutors) Adiel Schmidt and Erich Oskar Huetter (Austria) in some delicate, imaginative and subtle playing of two movements from a Telemann work. Another enjoyable item was the playing of an arrangement of the subject and three of the variations from Bach’s “Goldberg Variations” elegantly presented by Asher Belchman (violin), Lara Karpalov (viola) and E.O. Huetter (‘cello). (Huetter, having visited Israel several times, has been involved in similar music projects with Arab youth.)

 

Contending easily and naturally with the orchestra, guest artist mezzo-soprano Noa Hope took players and audience to the world of opera with “Voi che sapete” (You who know what love is) from Mozart’s “Marriage of Figaro”, her creamy, substantial voice well integrated with her communicative stage performance. Hope’s dramatic and colourful rendition of the Habanera from Bizet’s “Carmen” displayed her dynamic range, well supported by the competence, accuracy and fine listening skills of the Music Factory players.

 

The festive concert concluded with two works of tango composer Astor Piazzolla, a rich and soundscape of captivating Argentinean rhythms, yearning and joy. Adding to the nostalgic yet life-affirming atmosphere of this music,  young accordionist, Uri Ofek, relaxed and smiling, wandering across the stage in front of the orchestra, had the audience enthralled by his competence and professionalism.

 

Throughout the evening, Chen Zimbalista introduced the evening’s artists and works with cheerful informality. Conducting, performing with them and soloing, he directed both young- and experienced players in a vibrant program of outstanding orchestral playing, promoting the harmony of co-existence.  

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Photo: Angelika Sher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Friday January 6th, Ms. Julie Fisher, wife of U.S. Ambassador to Israel Daniel B. Shapiro, hosted a reception at their residence as part of the “Art in Embassies” program. The event opened an exhibition designed to foster cultural ties between countries through art.

 

 

 


Mr. Thomas Genton, Counselor for Press and Cultural Affairs at the US Embassy, opened the evening’s festivities by welcoming guests and introducing Ms. Fisher. Both Mr. Genton and Ms. Fisher discussed the importance of art as a bridge between nations.

 

 

Following these opening remarks, artists were called up to receive certificates of appreciation for their work. Exhibition curator Keren Bar Gil and artists Yair Barak and Ohad Matalon then spoke, describing the role of the art in representing unique artistic expressions while connecting the cultures of Israel and the United States.

 

 

 

The exhibition was part of the Art in Embassies (AIE) program. The AIE program incorporates art into U.S. public diplomacy, using the visual arts and artist exchanges to facilitate cross-cultural dialogue and increased understanding.  The program was started more than a half century ago by the Museum of Modern Art and the U.S. Department of State under President John F. Kennedy. Today, AIE has grown to become a public-private partnership engaging more than 20,000 participants at 200 venues in 189 countries. AIE allows the U.S. State Department to create and bolster relationships of trust, respect and understanding, and to build intercultural bridges of peace.

 

 

The exhibition featured the work of leading American and Israeli artists, including Ohad Matalon, Yair Barak, Boaz Aharonovich, Tamir Sher, Sivan Sternbach, Mindy Weisel, Deborah Hamon, Isca Greenfield-Sanders, and Enrique Martínez Celaya. The works focused on the theme of childhood, and the shared importance of children in American and Israeli culture. More information on the exhibition, and the artists and artwork shown, can be found here.

 

Among the guests who attended the event were Yael “Yuli” Tami, an Israeli academic and former Knesset member; Assaf Pinkus, formerly head of the Art History Department at Tel Aviv University and the chair of the Tel Aviv Israeli Art Foundation; and Kena Shoval, the wife of Zalman Shoval, a former Knesset member and Israeli Ambassador to the United States.

 

Photos by Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

British Plutocrats from Baghdad  
Presentation by 
Lyn  Julius

 

 

Friday, January 6, 2017   at 11:00The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center
83 Mordechai  Ben Porat  Ave. , Or Yehuda


 
Reservations required, limited seating
Tel: 03-5339278     ext. 8

 

Free admission For BJHC members

 

20 NIS  for guests

 

Members of the Sassoon dynasty, the 'Rothschilds of the East', and their business associates settled in England at the turn of the last century where they aspired to become part of the establishment, spending their wealth on grand homes and valuable collections. 

 

Lyn  Julius will talk about  such personalities as Sir Philip Sassoon, who hobnobbed with kings, ministers and artists; Hannah Gubbay,  Sir Percival David, Rachel Beer and others.  Are the Saatchis and the Reuben brothers today's plutocrats from Baghdad?

 

The Event will be held in English

 

The Center 

 

The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center was founded in 1973 as a non-profit organisation to preserve the heritage of the Babylonian Jewish exile which no longer exists today.

 

Located in Or-Yehuda, it is the largest institute in the world dedicated to documenting, researching, collecting and preserving the spiritual treasures and art created by Babylonian Jewry. Babylonia was the location of the most significant works of the Jewish nation, including: the Babylonian Talmud, the writings of the Geonim, the Responsa works, and more.

 

In order to preserve this heritage, collect the textual and visual materials and make them accessible to the general public, various branches of the Center were established: the museum, the research institute, the library and the treasures and guidance department.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On December 26th, the Hebrew University’s weekly Monday Afternoon Concert Series featured Ensemble Divina Insania, a Baroque chamber music group consisting of Israeli musicians living in Europe or in Israel and performing on period instruments. Guest artist was violinist Shunske Sato (Holland). Joining him were Doret Florentin (recorder), Tali Goldberg (violin) Benny Aghassi (bassoon, Hen Goldsobel (contrabass) and Yizhar Karshon (harpsichord). The Monday Afternoon Series series is directed and introduced by Dr. Sara Pavlov.

 

The concert opened with all players in an eloquent reading of the Overture to G.F.Händel’s  opera “Giustino” (Justin), which was premiered at Covent Garden in 1737, its formal, homophonic opening evocative of the pomp of the coronation ceremony with which the plot begins. The allegro section offered some charming duets. Händel had a splendid oboist/recorder player in his orchestra, hence the challenging soprano recorder part, managed well by Florentin.

 

Then to Neapolitan composer Francesco Mancini’s (1672-1737) Recorder Concerto in A-minor, one of 12 of his appearing in a collection of concertos by Alessandro Scarlatti, Domenico Sarro, Francesco Barbella, Giovanni Batista Mele and Roberto Valentini (the English Robert Valentine) in a Naples conservatory. Enjoying a solid and vibrant basso continuo section, the ensemble’s reading of the piece, with much lively interaction between Florentin and Sato, was alive and spontaneous, its textures alternating between utterances of only violins and recorder and tutti moments, with some silver-tongued harpsichord spreads adding sparkle to calmer moments. Rich in well-crafted melodies and a sprinkling of surprises, the work, indeed demanding to play, made for fine entertainment. Primarily an opera composer, the list of Mancini’s instrumental works is small. Divina Insania’s colourful performance of the concerto emphasized how unjust it is that this leading figure of Naples’ cultural life and education (he was a rival to Alessandro Scarlatti) should have fallen into oblivion.

 

Of his more than 550 concertos, Antonio Vivaldi composed 39 bassoon concertos, for whom we can only guess, and the plot thickens if one considers that the bassoon had not yet been used as a solo instrument in Venice. It is thought that these Vivaldi concertos were written between 1728 and 1737. Vivaldi, though not a bassoonist, shows a thorough understanding of the instrument’s expressive and technical possibilities, taking the player on a journey through the bass and tenor registers, however, also through the concept of a string-player, with demanding arpeggios, rapid scales and register leaps. Benny Aghassi had listeners perched at the edge of their seats right from the first notes of the work’s wild unison opening, as he scurried up and down the bassoon range with articulate agility, warmth of timbre and pizzazz, with the violins adding comments and accents to complete the joie-de-vivre of the outer movements. In the Largo movement, with the bassoon’s languorous agenda set against held chords in the strings, Aghassi created small pauses between sections, as if each time searching anew for suitable inspiration for each gesture.  Throughout the work, he communicated closely with his fellow players and with the audience. Benny Aghassi’s virtuosity and musicality left the listener wishing for more!

 

Performing Vivaldi’s Concerto for Recorder, Violin and Bassoon in D-major RV92, Florentin, Sato and Aghassi interacted vigilantly, the opening Allegro giving each artist much to say, as Sato signed out of it, tugging a little at the heart strings as he leaned into a dissonant penultimate note. Following the second movement, in which Florentin and Sato engaged in a moving dialogue, with Aghassi weaving long lines of gently inégal notes throughout, the artists’ technical command was displayed in the final, somewhat witty, abundantly imitative Allegro movement.

 

Most of us had no idea of what was in store when Shunske Sato and Yizhar Karshon launched into little-known Italian composer Giovanni Pandolfi Mealli’s Sonata for Violin and Continuo in D-minor opus 4 No.4 “La Biancuccia”. The opus 4 violin sonatas were published in 1660. Here was a vivid example of the “stylus phantasticus”, referred to in 1650 by Jesuit polymath Athanasius Kircher as being “especially suited to instruments…the most free and unrestrained method of composition…bound neither to any words or to a melodic subject… instituted to display genius and teach the hidden design of harmony…”. In this highly representative piece of the style, bristling with unpredictability and acrobatics, the artists juxtaposed its extreme moods in a continuum of sections expressing frenzy and lyricism (even moderation), coloured with accelerandi and audacious harmonic changes, rumbling harpsichord textures and the profuse ornamentation that emanated from under Sato’s fingers as he quizzically eyed the mesmerized audience. Karshon was with Sato all the way, as they introduced the audience to an uninhibited and totally delectable 17th century musical version of a Hitchcock movie. A musician at the court of Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Austria, Pandolfi Mealli dedicated this sonata to a castrato.  In 1669, when a violinist in the Messina Cathedral, he fled Sicily after murdering a castrato singer, then working as a violinist in the Capilla Real of Madrid. Who said music history was boring?

 

Appropriately timed (December 26th) the last work on the program was Arcangelo Corelli’s Christmas Concerto in G-minor Opus 6 No.8, with the Divina Insania artists lending supple and graceful expression to its lush, melodic beauty and undulating suspensions, its tempo contrasts and its dance movements, ending with the wonderful lilting pastoral movement, with its folk-like tunes, bagpipe drone effect and sense of wonder.

 

This was Shunske Sato’s first Israeli visit.

 

Photo of Shunske Sato: Yat Ho Tsang

 

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About 500 people attended Ronit Farm on Saturday night (24.12) to take part in the traditional event in honor of wounded IDF soldiers and members of security forces who have been rehabilitated at the Loewenstein hospital. The event was organized by Ora and Yair Shani, together with the Organization of Disabled IDF Veterans and the Association of Friends of the Loewenstein Hospital. Participating in the event were hospital management, therapeutic staff, and members of the Friends Association.

 

 

The event opened with a political speech by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, followed by the Prime Minister lighting the first Hanukkah candle with Amazia Fensterheim, fighter in the engineering company of the paratroopers. Amazia was wounded during the Tzuk Eitan operation, in a battle in which four of his comrades were killed by a roadside bomb in Khan Younis. Amazia was the first fighter in the Tzuk Eitan operation to come for rehabilitation to Loewenstein Hospital, to the Orthopedic Rehabilitation Department. The Prime Minister was joined for the menorah lighting by: Eli Defes, the CEO of Clalit, Prof. Amiram Catz, Director of Loewenstein Hospital, and Dr. Dudu Dagan, Chief Medical Officer.

 

 

Prof. Amiram Catz, Director of Loewenstein Hospital, addressed the audience and said: "Hanukkah symbolizes the triumph of spirit and sophistication over the material, however strong or numerous it might be. It is a wonderful occasion to celebrate the victory over the severe wounds to body and soul. The success of our patients, who felt and were considered to be struggling against all odds, but received help from our doctors and therapists, which produced new opportunities and brought them to realization. On behalf of all Loewenstein staff, I salute the wounded soldiers and members of our security forces, those who returned to be part of Israeli society, which embraces them, and who contribute their talents to society; those who returned to independence and high-quality life; those who realized their latent capabilities after they had been wounded; and also those who still have a long way ahead of them toward improvement and realization of their capabilities."

 

 

 

 

 

At the event, a moving documentary was screened about the rehabilitation journey of Ophir Cohen, a paramedic in the 53rd battalion of Armored Brigade 188, who sustained a critical head injury from a mortar shell during the Tzuk Eitan operation. Ophir still continues the process of his rehabilitation at Loewenstein, and his physicians and therapists are confident that significant achievements await him in the future.

 

 

The second part of the evening consisted of a gala dinner accompanied by performances of Si Heiman, Moran Mazuz, Tal Sondak, and others.

 

Loewenstein Rehabilitation Hospital of the Clalit Group has been rehabilitating wounded soldiers since the Six Day War to the present, and has many years of experience treating soldiers. Over the years it developed a close relationship with the IDF and the Defense Ministry. Since its establishment, the hospital has rehabilitated hundreds of soldiers in active and reserve service, who were injured in battles, accidents, and terrorist attacks.

 

Photo credit: Oren Jezreel / Silvia G. Golan .

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rabbi Lau to open conference by lighting a menorah from Krakow

 

(26 December 2016 – Jerusalem) The Hanukah story is one that is centered on Jewish identity and symbolizes Jewish resilience and strength. Therefore, it is especially befitting that during the first-ever International Conference for Jewish Educators at Yad Vashem's International School for Holocaust Studies, entitled "The Shoah and Jewish Identity: Challenges in Jewish Education," there will be special Hanukah candle-lighting ceremonies using authentic Hanukiot (menorahs) from the Yad Vashem Artifacts Collection that survived the horrors of the Holocaust. "Each menorah has a unique story similar to those of Holocaust survivors themselves," says conference organizer Ephraim Kaye, Director of the Jewish World and International Seminars Department at the International School for Holocaust Studies. "Just as we use artifacts and testimonies to tell the story of the Holocaust, so, too, are these Menorahs examples of how Jews put themselves at risk to maintain their Jewish identities."

 

The International Conference, taking place 26-29 December 2016 (third-sixth days of Hanukah) will be kicked off with a special candle-lighting ceremony by world-renowned Holocaust survivor and Chairman of the Yad Vashem Council Rabbi Israel Meir Lau. Rabbi Lau, whose mother was from Krakow, will light the special "Krakow Menorah" a rare menorah crafted in Bruges (Brussels) which dates back to the late 18th or early 19th century. The menorah represents a façade of a wooden synagogue which was common in Lithuania and Poland up until the Shoah. Many of these synagogues were burned and destroyed during World War II. This multi-purpose menorah was also used to light the Sabbath candles on a weekly basis. At the end of the war, the returning Jews found the menorah with other items from this once thriving epicenter of Jewish life, and it was given to Yad Vashem for preservation and commemoration.

 

  

Other menorah being used at the conference is the world-famous Hanukah Menorah from Kiel, Germany. This menorah belonged to Rabbi Dr. Akiva Posner, who served as the last Rabbi of the community of Kiel, Germany from 1924-1933. With the rise of the Nazi Party to power, Rabbi Posner began protesting the insurgence of antisemitic sentiment in the city. Despite his efforts, tension and violence continued to rise in Kiel, forcing Rabbi Posner and his family to flee.  In 1933, he, his wife Rachel and their three children left for Eretz IsraelYehuda Mansbach, grandson of Rabbi Akiva and Rachel Posner, will light the menorah for the fourth night of Hanukkah.

 

In 1940, Zelig Scheinowitz crafted a simple wooden menorah from plywood while interned in the Westerbork detention camp. Scheinowitz worked in the clothing factory sorting and fixing cloths. Due to his profession, he managed to survive and together with his family and menorah, he was liberated in April 1945 by the Canadian Army. The menorah was eventually donated to Yad Vashem by Nachman Scheinowitz. Thirty-eight members of Scheinowitz family, including one survivor, will be present at the candle-lighting ceremony on 28 December 2016.

 

The stories of these Menorah and other artifacts can be found in an online exhibition, entitled "Hanukkah – The Festival of Lights."  In this moving exhibition, Yad Vashem shares with the public images, testimonies and artifacts of some of the ways this holiday was observed throughout Europe before, during and immediately after the Holocaust. 

 

About the conference: For the first time, over 200 Jewish day-school principals, headmasters and senior Jewish Studies educators, from 34 countries and six continents around the world, will be gathering at the Yad Vashem International School for Holocaust Studies for the conference. The international conference will be the largest and most prestigious gathering of leaders in Jewish education from Jewish day schools and centers for informal Jewish education worldwide. Throughout the course of the conference, leading experts from Yad Vashem will present its unique and cutting-edge pedagogical approaches relating to Holocaust education.

 

Over the years, the Yad Vashem Artifacts Collection has amassed one of the world's largest collection, containing some 30,000 items.  For more information about these Hanukiot and the Yad Vashem Archives and Artifacts Collection, please contact Simmy Allen, Head, International Media Section in Yad Vashem's Communications Division.

 

 

Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, was established in 1953. Located in Jerusalem, it is dedicated to Holocaust commemoration, documentation, research and education. www.yadvashem.org

 

Image Captions: All photos should be credited to Yad Vashem Photo Archives

 

Mansbach Menorah Image - A photograph taken in 1932 by Rachel, wife of Rabbi Akiva Posner, of their candle-lit Hanukkah menorah against the backdrop of the Nazi flags flying from the building across from their home in Kiel Germany

Krakow Menorah Image - Krakow Poland - Hanukkah Menorah in the shape of a synagogue. 

 

Westerbrook Menorah Image – In 1940, Zelig Scheinowitz crafted a simple Hanukkah menorah in the camp from plywood for the use of his family.

 

DP Camp Menorah Image - The truncated tree and a sprouting leaf on this Hannukah menorah are the symbol of She’arit Hapleta (The Surviving Remnant).

 

 Photo provided by 

Communications Division  Yad Vashem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Chanukah

Chanukah
Unlike most of the major Jewish holidays, Chanukah’s origin is not in the Bible, but rather in events that happened later. This is a holiday that lasts eight days and begins on the 25th of the Hebrew month of Kislev (usually in December). There are no completely holy days, so businesses are open as usual.

 

Chanukah marks a historic event that took place in the Seleucid period, in the 2nd century BCE. A few of the Seleucid kings (the dynasty that followed Alexander the Great, and which was based in Syria) tried to force the Jews in the Land of Israel to adopt certain customs that were against the laws of Judaism. The worst decree was when King Antiochus IV ordered the installation of a statue in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem.

 

In 167 BCE, the Jews revolted against the Greek Seleucid regime. A few of the leaders of the revolt, the Hasmoneans, or Maccabees, were the sons of Mattathias, the high priest. In 164 BCE, under the leadership of Judah Maccabee, the revolt reached its climax with the liberation of Jerusalem from foreign rule, including the Holy Temple. The events are documented in a few historical sources written at the end of the 2nd century CE, a few decades after the revolt. According to Jewish tradition, the holiday of Chanukah was instituted by Judah Maccabee.

 

The holiday lasts eight days, commemorating the celebrations marking the purification and rededication of the Holy Temple, and a miracle recorded in the traditions: When the Maccabees looked for holy oil to light the candelabrum in the Temple, they found only one small flask whose seal had not been broken and was therefore still pure. The oil in the flask was enough for only one day, but a miracle occurred and the oil burned of eight days. In addition to the element of heroism marked by this holiday, Chanukah also has a motif of light against darkness, so Chanukah is also called the holiday of Lights.

 

In modern times, Chanukah has been adopted as a symbol of the Jews’ struggle against their enemies on both the religious and national level. Today some people emphasize the religious, miraculous side of the holiday, while others focus on the national victory aspect. In any event, this is a holiday full of joy and is a special favorite among children.

 

Holiday Customs

 

 

Sufgania
Candle lighting - Throughout the eight days of Chanukah candles are lit in a Chanukiah, a candelabrum with eight branches in a row and an extra candle holder, called the shamash, from which the other candles are lit. On each night of Chanukah an additional candle is lit, starting with one on the first night, two on the second, etc. The shamash is always lit, too, such that in practice two candles are lit the first night, three on the second, etc. The Chanukiah is placed on the window sill or in some other visible place, and it is forbidden to use the light for any purpose. There is a custom to light the Chanukiah with olive oil, although most people today use colorful wax candles. A short blessing is recited over the lighting of the candles, a ceremony in which children are included, and which is followed by the singing of Chanukah songs.

 

Jelly donuts (sufganiot) and potato fritters - Another Chanukah custom is the eating of special foods, mainly those fried in oil, such as donuts and fritters.

 

Spinning tops - children play with four-sided spinning tops, marked with the Hebrew initials of a Great Miracle Happened Here. It is also customary to give children “Chanukah gelt” money for buying candies or toys.

 

 

  

Important Information

dreidl (spinning top)
Chanukah, which is not a Torah-ordained holiday, is relatively minor from the perspective of its sanctity, so most businesses are open as usual. In order to experience a bit of the spirit of this holiday, try tasting the traditional foods, particularly the sufganiot - a kind of donut without a hole in the middle, usually filled with jam, but also made with other sweet fillings. If you happen to be in Jerusalem during Chanukah, it is worth taking a walk through the ultra-Orthodox Mea She’arim neighborhood in the early evening, to enjoy the sight of hundreds of Chanukiahs lit in the windows of the homes.

 

 

 Photos provided by GoIsrael.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Design Museum Holon’s newest exhibition opens on the 20th of December 2016.  Overview engages with one of the most important inventions in human history, and a desirable design object: eyeglasses. The exhibition follows the development and future of eyeglasses through several different points of view: from the unique Claude Samuel retrospective eyeglasses collection dating back to the 17th century to contemporary conceptual interpretations of eyeglasses by 50 Israeli designers highlighting the creative energy of the Israeli design scene. In addition, the exhibition explores the new Virtual Reality (VR) technology, as well as the different ways sight and design can interact through various activities.

 

On the ground floor in Dr. Shulamit Katzman Gallery, Design Museum Holon presents more than 40 commissioned works by Israeli designers from a variety of backgrounds, including fashion, textile, jewellery and product design to answer the question: “What are eyeglasses?” This part of the exhibition demonstrates the transformational nature of this design object through Israeli designers’ myriad of interpretations, compelling visitors to engage and question the themes of vision and self-image. For example, renowned Israeli product designer Yaacov Kaufman explores the evolution of eyeglasses from monocle to mask, presenting it in a striking comparison to human evolution. Dana Ben Shalom, in contrast, delves into the relationship between glasses and the nose, whilst Galit Shvo reinterprets how glasses can be worn and their subsequent connection to the face.

 

In contrast to the modern interpretations of eyeglasses presented in the Lower Gallery, the Museum’s Upper Gallery (500 m2) showcases more than 400 items from collector Claude Samuel. A visual display of the history of eyewear, his extensive collection showcases the ways in which different cultural milestones actively influenced and were influenced by the invention and evolution of eyeglasses. Unique pieces ranging from Elton John and John Lennon style eyeglasses to authentic Eskimo bone eyewear are exhibited alongside sketches of eyewear designs made by Claude's father from the Pierre Cardin Fashion House, and more. This is the first time this collection is presented in a museum.

 

 

 

 

Vision Test’, part three of the exhibition, presents visitors with various objects from the Aharon Feiner Eden Materials Library that are also part of the Museum's permanent collection. These challenge the interaction between sight and design through interactive activities and optical illusions related to focus, colour and perspective. One example is Carnovsky Studio’s award winning RGB project, consisting of a large-scale multi-layered wallpaper, which projects different images depending on the colour of light illuminating the wall. This project was made possible through the support of the Istituto Italiano di Cultura and the Italian Embassy in Israel.

 

To complement the overall theme of the exhibition, Design Museum Holon's Design Lab engages in what the future of eyeglasses holds through an interactive display of Virtual Reality glasses in collaboration with The French Institute of Israel, Forum des Image and Holon Cinemateque. The Lab also features a “repairing reality” workshop dedicated to repairing and renewing eyeglasses, where visitors can bring in their old glasses and refurbish them in their own style. In addition, through an exclusive application created for the exhibition and a web camera incorporated into a big mirror screen, visitors are able to look at a projected image of themselves wearing different eyeglasses from the Claude Samuel collection and share the captured images on social media.

 

“Engaging with eyeglasses, such a common and everyday object, can be carried out from so many angles, but we have chosen to engage with it from the perspective of the person using the object. In the exhibition we will examine cultural milestones and the central role eyeglasses played in defining social and cultural phenomena. We tend to forget that the initial purpose of eyeglasses was to correct a flaw, and eyeglasses do not conceal that flaw, but actually emphasise it by means of design. The exhibition will not only enable an observation of the cultural history of eyeglasses, but also of the designer's role throughout the process,” Maya Dvash, Exhibition Curator and Museum's Acting Chief Curator.

 

 

About Design Museum Holon

Designed by world-renowned architect Ron Arad, Design Museum Holon was inaugurated in March 2010 and has quickly established itself as one of the most exciting developments to emerge in the Middle East. The Museum is part of an urban regeneration initiative that aims to transform the City of Holon into a centre for design. Central to Design Museum Holon’s mission is to supply an enriching and thought-provoking environment for visitors to explore exciting and engaging design ideas, principles, processes and objects in a tactile and practical fashion. www.dmh.org.il

 

 

Photos Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first three parts of J.S.Bach’s Christmas Oratorio BWV 248 were recently performed in two performances in Jerusalem and one in Bethlehem. With Gunther M. Goettsche (music director of the Redeemer Church, Jerusalem) and Erwin Meyer sharing the conducting, members of three choirs – the Choir of the Redeemer Church (Jerusalem), of the Schmidt Schule (Jerusalem) and of the Olive Branches Choir (Bethlehem) joined to form a large chorus. They were joined by the Belvedere Chamber Orchestra Weimar (Germany). Soloists were Heidrun Goettsche-soprano, Anne-Marieke Evers-alto, Sebastian Hübner-tenor and Samuel Lawrence Berlad-bass. This writer attended the performance at the Dormition Abbey, Mt. Zion, in which Erwin Meyer was conductor. Father Nikodemus, of the Dormition Abbey, offered words of welcome to the large audience.

 

Bach’s Christmas Oratorio was completed around Christmas in 1734. Its format is that of a cantata, with the tenor Evangelist narrating the story of the birth of Christ. All texts sung by the Evangelist are minimally accompanied in order to give the Gospel texts prominence. From Christmas Day to Epiphany in the 18th century, the town of Leipzig celebrated the birth of Jesus and the events surrounding it with six commemorations taking place between Christmas Day and the Feast of Epiphany. At each of those events, Bach’s congregation was presented with a single cantata of the Christmas Oratorio, recounting one of the stories, their biblical texts accompanied by reflective texts. The three first cantatas heard at the Jerusalem and Bethlehem performances feature the first three celebrating the birth of Jesus (December 25th), the shepherds’ adoration of the baby (December 27th) and the circumcision and naming of Jesus (New Year’s Day).

 

From the opening five-note phrase on the timpani, the performance at the Dormition Abbey was one of joy. Choruses, with the chorales reflecting the voice of the people, were well coordinated and articulate; the singers were attentive, their phrases shaped, full of impetus and energy, making for rewarding choral performance. Served well by his bright, rich and agreeable tenor voice, Sebastian Hübner gave the narrative spontaneity and flexibility, at times urgency and even suspense. In the virtuosic “Joyful shepherds, hurry, ah hurry”, he and the orchestra’s very excellent flautist in the obligato role communicated and embellished with alacrity. Honorary professor at the Heidelberg University of Church Music, Sebastian Hübner has a wide repertoire, has premiered new works and is a member of the Schola Heidelberg Ensemble.

 

There was much natural warmth and richness in the singing of German-American baritone Samuel Lawrence Berlad, standing in for bass Peter Schüler, who had taken ill. His mix of mellifluousness and dramatic flair gave colour and life to text and music, as in the dialogue with obligato trumpet in “Great Lord, O mighty king”.  An opera singer, Samuel Berlad is also a Jewish cantorial singer and voice teacher, heading the vocal department of the Tel Aviv Cantorial Institute. Dutch-born mezzo-soprano Anne-Marieke Evers, much specialized in performance of early music, dealt with the alto recitatives and arias with outstanding vocal presence, projecting her voice amply and with natural ease into the acoustic space of the church. In the aria “Sleep, my dearest”, she recreated this moving jewel of a lullaby in gentle, empathic yet substantial singing, as the basso continuo repeated the note g in octave leaps to depict rocking the baby. With a minimum in the way of solo soprano arias, we heard duets with tenor and bass from renowned voice teacher Heidrun Goettsche. Pronouncing the angel’s words (in effect, God’s words) “Do not fear”, the recitative accompanied by held chords in the strings, we heard one of the girls of the Schmidt School choir, her clean, fresh voice conveying the message of solemnity, succour and hope.

 

Members of the Belvedere Orchestra Weimar (concertmaster: Johannes Müller) are all students at the Music Gymnasium Schloss Weimar, a selective high school for talented young musicians from Germany and other countries. The orchestra was outstanding throughout the performance, its balance, intonation and obligato roles refined, sophisticated and subtle. Conductor, piano accompanist and composer Erwin Meyer, director of the Olive Branches Choir (Bethlehem), drew all the participants together in conducting that was articulate, expressive and exhilarating.  A fine mix of people from many communities attended the festive event.

 

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Photo: Maria Ciocan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra’s second concert for the 2016-2017 season offered Baroque music aficionados a unique program. This writer attended the event, “A Christmas Special”, in the Mary Nathaniel Golden Hall of Friendship of the Jerusalem International YMCA on December 8th 2016.

 

Due to illness of one of one of the artists, there was a last-minute program change: instead of J.S.Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.6, we heard Bach’s Trio Sonata for organ BWV 527 performed in the traditional Baroque trio sonata format by Idit Shemer-flute, Noam Schuss-violin, Orit Messer-Jacobi-‘cello and JBO founder and musical director David Shemer-organ. The Sonatas for Organ (BWV 525-530) from around 1730, (they may also have been played on pedal-clavichord or pedal-harpsichord) written when J.S.Bach was tutoring his eldest son Wilhelm Friedemann in organ and composition, are made up of earlier composed instrumental movements, newly composed movements and older organ works. With Johann Sebastian’s choice of clear textures for this instructional material, requiring the young organist to exercise total independence of hands and feet, what distinguish these works from other organ repertoire are their textures which imitate the instrumental trio sonata, inviting a variety of transcriptions which date from the 18thcentury to today.  Addressing the fact that they are neither the flamboyant toccatas and fugues nor the chorale-preludes imbued with mystery, the JBO artists did not dispense with the intimate and eloquent character both of the piece and also of the Baroque instrumental sound, despite its performance in a hall. With Idit Shemer playing a Baroque traverso flute, the other instrumentalists pared down their volume to what resulted in chamber music of fine transparency and poetic nuance, with sympathetic contrapuntal dialogues woven between flute and violin. A nice aperitif to the evening and presented by core JBO players.

 

Then to Dietrich Buxtehude’s (c.1637-1707) cantata cycle “Membra Jesu Nostri” (The Limbs of Our Jesus) BuxWV 75, a mystical work based on a collection of hymns in which each cantata represents the glance of a believer, standing at the foot of the cross, as he addresses parts of Christ’s body, his focus moving upwards from Christ’s feet to his face. The text, thought to have been written by Cistercian monk Arnulf de Louvain (c.1200-1250), reflects the rise of 17th century Lutheran pietism and its characteristic subjectively emotional sentiments. Each cantata is constructed along the same lines, the opening instrumental sinfonia followed by a “dictum”, an aria of three stanzas, with the dictum repeated at the end. The composer only breaks this form in the last cantata, where the repeated dictum is replaced by a lavish Amen. The work is scored for a small ensemble and five singers, the latter singing solos and small group- and tutti sections. The JBO instrumentalists were joined by members of Ensemble PHOENIX (founder and musical director: Myrna Herzog) and Tal Ganor-soprano, Anat Czarny-mezzo-soprano, Avital Dery-mezzo-soprano, Hillel Sherman-tenor and Guy Pelc-bass. In performance that was unforced rather than dramatic, with emphasis on clear diction, David Shemer led instrumentalists and singers through the work, preserving its meditative, devout and soul-searching character. For Cantata No.6, the instrumental sound world changes markedly: the violinists stand down and four viol players join ‘cello, theorbo and organ in a mellow, velvety setting to present “To the Heart”. This is indeed the heart of the work. The original ensemble returns for the final cantata and the viols are gone. The choruses presented a lively and interesting mix of vocal timbres, with vocal trios highlighting intensity of texts.  Add to that Anat Czarny’s attractive, radiant voice, Avital Dery’s spiritual understanding of the work, Hillel Sherman’s burgeoning, natural tenor, Guy Pelc’s gentle intensity and Tal Ganor’s creamy, blending timbre. Ganor, just a little too careful, could have projected her voice further into the YMCA hall.   The instrumentalists, including the evocative sound of the theorbo (Eliav Lavi), seized every opportunity to add interest and beauty to a work that is quite exquisite.

 

In his program notes, Maestro Shemer speaks of the fact that the music of the “veritable giant” Buxtehude “has not had fitting representation on Israeli music platforms”. The impact this performance has had (more Easter-oriented than Christmas) will hopefully mean that we hear more works of the Danish-German genius, whose music had such a profound influence on J.S.Bach.

 

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Photo: Maxim Reider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yamato Japanese Drumming Troupe Arrives for Three Performances in Israel

 

 
Gad Oron Producction ( Israel ) presents 
 

C:\Users\Roni\Documents\אירועים\YAMATO 2016\חומרים\לוגו\O-tomoe3.jpg

FEEL THE BEAT


World tour 2016

 
 
 
 
 
  

Yamato, The Drummers of Japan, have arrived in Israel as part of their 2016 world tour, Feel the Beat. The legendary drumming troupe, whose art reflects a tradition that is 1,500 years old, is giving three performances in the country: in the Haifa Auditorium on December 10, at Heichal Hatarbut in Tel Aviv on December 12, and at the Beersheba Center for the Performing Arts on December 14.

 

All the performances are scheduled to begin at 20.30.

 
 

"DAZZLING. THEY FILL THE STAGE WITH HUGE BEAUTIFUL DRUMS AND BEAT SEVEN BELLS OUT OF THEM WITH PHENOMENAL SKILL. SIMPLY BREATHTAKING DRUMMING"

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

 
 
December 10 Haifa
December 12  Tel Aviv
December 14 Beer Sheva
 
 

:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tickets for the Tel Aviv performance may be ordered by phoning
 

 

8780* www.leaan.co.il Tel Aviv
 
 
14.12.16   8949* www.ticket4u.co.il Beer Sheva
8557*  www.mishkan7.co.il
 
 
 
Photos provided by PR 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

The 2016-7 season of the Israel Opera Company debuted on November 30 with a rousing performance of the opera Norma, by Vincenzo Bellini. The production, by Teatro of Torino, was conducted by Daniel Oren of the Opera Orchestra: Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon Lezion.

 

 

The lead roles of Norma and Pollione were sung by soprano Hrachuhi Bassenz and Gustavo Porta respectively. At the curtain calls, Ms. Bassenz received the longest sustained applause for her bravura performance. Ms. Bassenz will be alternating in the role of Norma with Maria Pia Piscitelli and Ira Bertman.

 

 

The outstanding male performer of the evening was bass-baritone Carlo Striulli in the role of Oroveso, the Druid chieftain.  

 

 

The stage scenery is as minimalistic as you will ever see in an opera production: monolithic blocks of stone that slide back and forth like curtains to create larger and smaller spaces for the action to take place. Still, the plain giant boulders had a simplistic grandeur about them.

 

 

 

 

The costuming was impressive, especially of the Druid warriors. The matching of Norma’s burgundy dress with Ms. Bassenz’s red hair was particularly striking.

 

 

The Israel Opera’s production of Norma runs through Dec. 17.

 

 

http://www.israel-opera.co.il/eng/

 

The Opera House

 

19 Shaul Hamelech Boulevard


Tel Aviv 61332


Tel: +972-3-692-7777
Fax: +972-3-692-7733

 

 

 

 

Comedy for Koby Tour Features Leading Names in American Comedy 

 

In response to the growing popularity of English-performing stand up artists on Israeli stages, three top American comedians are preparing to appear in the multi-city tour with sales to benefit victims of terror and tragedy.  Elyane Boosler, Allan Havey and Tom Cotter are all accomplished comedic actors who have previously appeared on late night television, in film and major comedy clubs and stages around the world.

 

The three will all perform in Israel for the first time under the Comedy for Koby banner beginning December 6th. Comedy for Koby is the twice annual stand up comedy fundraising tour for The Koby Mandell Foundation, benefitting bereaved families and victims of terror. The tour, hosted by Israeli born, Los Angeles- based comedian Avi Liberman, will be showing in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, Beit Shemesh, Modiin, Gush Etzion and Raanana.

 

All proceeds from the Comedy for Koby tour go to benefit programs of The Koby Mandell Foundation, named in memory of 13 year old Koby Mandell, who was killed in a terror attack in 2001. Working with bereaved children and families, the Foundation offers ongoing social and therapeutic programs including Camp Koby.

 

Past comics who have performed under the Comedy for Koby banner include Roastmaster General Jeffrey Ross, Daily Show correspondent Roy Wood Jr., opening act for Jerry Seinfeld Mark Schiff, Emmy Award winning Judy Gold and Comic Strip Live’s Wayne Cotter.

 

“Bringing this level of comedy to Israel gives us so much joy,” said Seth Mandell, father of Koby and co-founder of the Foundation. “It allows others to associate me and my family with a smile and a laugh rather than just with sadness and trepidation. Not only does the money from the shows go to help the bereaved families, but the shows bring much needed laughter and release for the community at a time of tension andnear daily terror.

 

DEC 6 – Beit Shemesh, Eshkol Payis – Aliyat Hanoar 6, 8:30pm

DEC 7 – Gush Etzion, Matnas Gush Etzion, 8:30pm
DEC 8 – Jerusalem, Beit Shmuel Theater, Eliyahu Shema 6, 7:00pm, 9:30pm
DEC 10 – Raanana, Yad Labanim, Achuza 147, 8:30pm
DEC 11 – Modiin, Heichal Hatarbut, Emek Dotan 49, 8:30pm
DEC 12 – Tel Aviv, Tzavta, Ibn Gevirol 30, 8:30pm
 
Tickets can be purchased at www.comedyforkoby.com
 Photo credit Yissachar Ruas
 
 

 

 

 

 

The Carmel Quartet (Israel) opened its 10th season of Strings and More in November 2016 with a concert titled “Viennese Gemütlichkeit”. This writer attended the English language lecture-concert on November 16th at the Jerusalem Music Centre, Mishkenot Sha’ananim. Not the usual Carmel Quartet line-up, players included quartet members Rachel Ringelstein-violin, Yoel Greenberg-violin/viola and Tami Waterman-‘cello; they were joined by Einav Yarden-piano and Naomi Shaham-double bass. The Strings and More Series is directed by Dr. Yoel Greenberg. Established in 1999, the Carmel Quartet appears in Israel, Europe and the USA, having made its China debut tour in 2013.

 

The German word “Gemütlichkeit”, whose loose translation might be “cosiness” or “geniality”, a central concept of the Biedermeier period in Central Europe between 1815 and 1848, reflected in artistic styles influencing literature, the visual arts, interior design and music. Yoel Greenberg, with the help of his fellow musicians and some interesting visuals, spoke about the Biedermeier “subplot” of the Romantic period, having originated in stories about an imaginary schoolmaster by the name of Gottlieb Biedermeier and representing honest, pious and unambitious people. The solid, conservative style of Biedermeier furniture is indicative of these values, reminding the audience that much Biedermeier art was evident in the home environment, no less in the form of house concerts.

 

Among opera composers of the time, Gioachimo Rossini was most popular for the melodiousness of his works. The evening’s music began with the last movement - Tempesta:Allegro - from Rossini’s Sonata for Strings No.6 in D-major, one of a set of six string sonatas the composer wrote in 1804 at age 12. The players gave articulate and lively expression to the storm brewing and dying down and rising again in this descriptive piece, to its effects of tempestuous, rapidly descending scales, bird calls, etc., to its vitality and to the composer’s astute separation and highlighting of ‘cello and double bass parts. Too often performed by larger ensembles, it was fitting and rewarding to hear the movement presented in its original one-to-a-part setting.

 

Referring the private Viennese salons, Greenberg pointed out that most of Schubert’s Lieder were first aired there. To create the atmosphere of such house music, the artists at the Jerusalem concert – four singing, with Einav Yarden at the piano – gave a hearty performance of Franz Schubert’s miniature “Der Tanz” (The Dance) D 826, one of the composer’s 130 part songs. Greenberg also pointed out that every respectable home at this time would now have a piano (an item of Biedermeier furniture), usually played by girls and young women and that, in the music salon, amateur players were often joined by one professional. Such was composer Johann Nepomuk Hummel, a dazzling piano virtuoso, the bulk of his compositions being written for the piano. Hummel’s Piano Quintet in E-flat major opus 87, composed in Vienna in 1802, is a masterpiece. Typical of music of the congenial Biedermeier sound world in its familiar-sounding melodious style, it would have appealed to 19th century audiences as it did the audience at the Jerusalem Music Centre. Unusual in scoring, it is written for violin, viola, ‘cello, piano and double bass. The challenging piano part (surely performed by the composer), its flamboyance and effervescence evident throughout, was splendidly handled by Einav Yarden in colourful, easeful playing, with the string players’ contribution warm, full and rich. From the quintet’s sombre, dark-hued opening, to the folksy reference of the second movement Ländler, with the brief, evocative Largo leading directly into the Finale, the latter’s Rondo creating a full music canvas with some frenzied piano utterances and other pleasing solos on the part of the strings, the players kept the audience involved in this seldom performed piece.

 

The program concluded with Franz Schubert’s Piano Quintet in A-major D.667, The Trout. Greenberg reminded the audience that many of Schubert’s works were heard in the Viennese salon, with baritone Johann Michael Vogel premiering many of the composer’s songs in Vienna’s private homes. Then there were the Schubertiades, as so wonderfully depicted in Moritz von Schwind’s 1868 drawing, events sponsored by Schubert’s wealthier friends or by Schubert aficionados.  Greenberg also spoke of the Biedermeier concept of uncomplicated enjoyment as in the musical description of the fish swimming on a sunny day and of the fact that the variations were on Schubert’s own Lied - “Die Forelle”. Then there is the genesis of the work, the 22-year-old Schubert’s response to the request of the work by Sylvester Paumgartner, a wealthy amateur ‘cellist from Upper Austria and to be played by a group of musicians coming together to play Hummel’s rearrangement of his (Hummel’s) Septet for the same instrumental combination. No rarely performed work, the Jerusalem rendition spoke in favour of live performance from the work’s very first notes. Superbly led and coloured by Carmel Quartet’s 1st violinist Rachel Ringelstein, the players brought to life every palpable gesture of the work in playing that was transparent, richly sonorous, with both personal playing and that and wrought of the players’ exceptional ensemble skills. The top-class quality playing of guest artists Einav Yarden and Naomi Shaham conformed to the Carmel Quartet’s unflagging standards of excellence.

 

 Photo: Stanley Waterman

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Coinciding with World Chess Championship tournament currently taking place in New York, Yad Vashem has launched a unique online exhibition:  Chess Sets, a Brief Respite from a Harsh RealityThe online exhibition features20 chess sets from the Yad Vashem Artifacts Collection. These chess sets were used by Jews both before, during and immediately after the Holocaust. Some were crafted during the war, others were made before the war and taken with Jews who were deported from their homes.

 

Playing chess often helped Jewish prisoners to endure the forced labor and the harsh conditions. For Jews who were in hiding during the war, chess was a way of passing the many idle hours of seclusion over months and even years. At the end of the war, the survivors themselves or the families of those who were murdered kept the chess sets along with the remaining personal effects that remained in their possession. The relatively large number of chess sets preserved in Yad Vashem's Artifacts Collection is evidence of the widespread popularity of the game during the war as a means of providing a brief respite from a harsh reality.

 

One of the chess sets featured in the exhibition belonged to Elhanan Ejbuszyc.  While imprisoned in a labor camp, he took a club that had been used to beat prisoners and carved chess pieces from it.  Ejbuszyc later explained: "What I achieved – turning a tool of punishment into a tool of peace after breaking it into pieces and carving chess pieces from it – was to give my fellow Jews a rare chance to forget their pitiful circumstances for a while. That brief moment of solace that I managed to bring to my fellow sufferers filled me with such joy – this was my reward…"

 

For more information about the chess sets featured here

 

or about the Yad Vashem's extensive Artifacts Collection

 

 About Yad Vashem :  

Yad Vashem's International Institute for Holocaust Research stands at the forefront of scholarly study on the Holocaust, providing comprehensive infrastructure for further investigation into this calamitous period in human history. The Research Institute is dedicated to advancing international research regarding the Shoah and fostering cooperative projects among academic institutions, as well as encouraging young scholars in their studies.

 

Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, was established in 1953. Located in Jerusalem, it is dedicated to Holocaust commemoration, documentation, research and education. www.yadvashem.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The vessel was discovered together with daggers, an axe head and arrowheads that were apparently buried as funerary offerings for one of the respected members of the ancient settlement.

 

 

A small extraordinary jug from the Middle Bronze Age was revealed with the assistance of pupils in the Land of Israel and Archaeology matriculation stream in an Israel Antiquities Authority archaeological excavation that was recently conducted in the city of Yehud prior to the construction of residential buildings.
 
According to Gilad Itach, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “It literally happened on the last day of the excavation when right in front of our eyes and those of the excited students an unusual ceramic vessel c. 18 cm high was exposed atop of is the image of a person. It seems that at first the jug, which is typical of the period, was prepared, and afterwards the unique sculpture was added, the likes of which have never before been discovered in previous research. The level of precision and attention to detail in creating this almost 4,000 year old sculpture is extremely impressive. The neck of the jug served as a base for forming the upper portion of the figure, after which the arms, legs and a face were added to the sculpture. One can see that the face of the figure seems to be resting on its hand as if in a state of reflection”. Itach added, “It is unclear if the figure was made by the potter who prepared the jug or by another craftsman”.
 
Efrat Zilber, supervisor responsible for coordinating the Land of Israel and Archaeology matriculation stream in the Ministry of Education emphasized that “the archaeological excavations provide an opportunity for an intensive and direct experience that connects the pupils with our country’s past. An experiential learning experience involving research methods employed in archaeology takes place while revealing the artifacts. The pupils meet experts in a variety of fields who share their knowledge with them, enrich the pupils while also enriching their world”.
 
 
The jug, which was broken when it was found, being restored in the laboratories of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Jerusalem.
 

In addition to the unique pottery vessel, other vessels and metal items were found such as daggers, arrowheads, an axe head, sheep bones and what are very likely the bones of a donkey. According to Itach, “It seems that these objects are funerary offerings that were buried in honor of an important member of the ancient community. It was customary in antiquity to believe that the objects that were interred alongside the individual continued with him into the next world. To the best of my knowledge such a rich funerary assemblage that also includes such a unique pottery vessel has never before been discovered in the country”.

In addition, a variety of evidence regarding the kind of life that existed there 6,000 years ago was exposed – among other things, pits and shafts were revealed that contained thousands of fragments of pottery vessels, hundreds of flint and basalt implements, animal bones, and a churn which is a unique vessel that was widely used in the Chalcolithic period for making butter.
The pupils of the Land of Israel and Archaeology matriculation stream participate in excavations as part of the new training course offered by the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Ministry of Education, which seeks to connect them with the past and help prepare the archaeologists of the future. Students who choose this course of study as part of their alternative evaluation for high school matriculation, take part in a week of excavation. They experience the variety of roles involved in the excavation, discuss questions regarding research and archaeological considerations and document the excavations in a field diary as part of their research work.
“Suddenly I saw many archaeologists and important people arriving who were examining and admiring something that was uncovered in the ground” recalls Ronnie Krisher, a pupil in the Land of Israel and Archaeology stream in the Roeh religious girls high school in Ramat Gan. “They immediately called all of us to look at the amazing statuette and explained to us that this is an extremely rare discovery and one that is not encountered every day. It is exciting to be part of an excavation whose artifacts will be displayed in the museum”.
 
 
 
 Photo: Clara Amit, courtesy IAA.

 The 3,800 year old jug as exposed in the field. Photo: EYECON Productions, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On November 13th 2016, the Sunday Evening Classics series at the Jerusalem Center for Near Eastern Studies (Brigham Young University) featured Alon Sariel-mandolin (Israel/Germany), Izhar Elias-guitar (Holland) and Michael Tsalka-piano (Israel/Holland) in a program of works all based on a song of Paisiello. The three artists, sharing a passion for historical performance and contemporary music, all having busy international careers, meet a number of times throughout the year to perform together. Composers from Europe, Canada, Israel and Australia have written works for this unique trio. The works heard at the Jerusalem concert appear on the trio’s first album “Paisiello in Vienna” (Brilliant Classics). The trio’s recently issued CD “Sharkiya” (IMI) presents the world’s first recording of original music for a plucked trio (harpsichord, guitar and mandolin) by Israeli composer Yehezkel Braun (1922-2014).

 

“Nel cor più non mi sento” (In my heart I no more feel) appears in Giovanni Paisiello’s 1788 comic opera “L’amor contrasto”, better known as “La Molinara”. A simple and sweetly sentimental melody, indeed, a vehicle for ornamentation by singers of the day, it has served as the theme for a host of instrumental works by several European composers.  The program opened with Alon Sariel and Izhar Elias’ performance of Bartolomeo Bortolazzi’s Variations in G-Major opus 8 on the song. There is some doubt as to this almost obscure Italian composer’s exact dates (possibly 1772-1846); what, however, is known is that he was a central figure in the field of plucked instruments, touring Vienna, Leipzig, Dresden and London as a mandolin virtuoso and singer. He wrote instrumental and vocal music, becoming the author of two important books on mandolin- and guitar methods. In 1809 he moved to Brazil, where he had connections with local music, theatre, politics and masonry. Sariel and Elias’ reading of the work rode on Sariel’s beautifully crafted, cantabile playing, on fine balance between the two artists, on the constant variety that well-written variations offer and on playing in which charm and directness enjoyed an equal footing.

 

Born in Pressburg (Slovakia), Johann Nepomuk Hummel (1778-1837) dedicated his Grande Sonata in C-major opus 37a (1810) to Bortolazzi. Hummel’s cosmopolitan style straddles Classical- and Romantic styles (Hummel studied with Mozart, Haydn, Salieri and Clementi). The Grande Sonata can be played on mandolin or violin and harpsichord or piano.  In the “Paisiello in Vienna” CD, Tsalka performs all the keyboard roles on fortepiano, well in keeping within the character of salon music of the time and whose sound meets plucked instruments at eye level. Playing on the BYU’s Steinway grand piano at the Jerusalem concert, Tsalka deftly pared down its volume to meet that of the mandolin, his touch lighter but shaped and expressive, their interaction imaginative, highlighting the different sound world of each tonality. Sariel took up the Andante movement’s enticement to add much embellishment, with both artists’ skilful and flexible rendering of the Rondo an intermixture of differently presented episodes, peppered with a dash of humour. Italian composer, guitarist, ‘cellist and singer Mauro Giuliani was one of the principal composers writing for piano and guitar, a seemingly unlikely combination. His Introduction and Variations in A-Major opus 113, written in the composer’s Vienna period, gave the audience the opportunity to hear and delight in Izhar Elias’s finely honed solo art. Following the unhurried piano introduction, Elias and Tsalka took turns to handle the melody and the piece’s whims and textures, with Elias engaging in ornately wrought phrase endings and transitions, building up momentum to end this fine concert piece with vigour.

 

Then to Ludwig van Beethoven’s Six Variations in G-Major WoO 70 for solo piano, one of the composer’s minor pieces, tossed off by Beethoven within a night to please a noblewoman next to whom he had been seated at an opera performance. Conforming to performance practice of the time, Michael Tsalka took the liberty to add just a few tasteful transitions and embellishments.  And, with the variations’ rapid runs, filigree textures and busy left hand moments, the audience was treated to elegant, finely detailed piano music, devoid of thick, heavy textures and certainly a far cry from the angry musings of Beethoven’s later works. The program concluded with all three artists performing prolific Bohemian composer J.B.Vanhal’s Six Variations in G-Major opus 42, for violin/flute and guitar/fortepiano. Following the piece’s opening flourish, the artists varied the work’s scoring and timbral colour by allotting a different instrumental combination to each variation, keeping the listener on his toes both visually and audially. Once again, each artist’s personal and different expression was instrumental in creating the ambiance of the salon of the Viennese aristocracy. We may not have been seated in the plush music room of a wealthy Austrian family, but we were certainly able to hear every filigree sound and fragile gesture played by the artists in the BYU auditorium.

 

Taking the audience back to the Middle East, the artists performed “Sharkiya” (East Wind) from their new CD, a work by Israeli composer Yehezkel Braun (1922-2014), its modal, inebriating soundscape delicately perfumed with exotic oriental rhythms and melodies.

 

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Photo: Sonja Bauermann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual culinary event Round Tables by American Express, in cooperation with the Embassy of Spain in Israel, sponsored a cooking demonstration by two of Spain’s leading chefs in Tel Aviv last week.

 

 

Chefs Rafael Centeno Moyer of Galicia and Javier Goya Carramolino of Madrid demonstrated the preparation of tapas to an audience gathered at the Dan Gourmet Fine Culinary Arts Cooking Center, in the presence of Spain’s Ambassador to Israel Fernando Carderera.

 

 

 
 
 
 

At a tapas reception held prior to the workshop, Ambassador Carderera welcomed participants to the event held under the heading “Spread the Culture.” Spanish tourism attaché for Italy and Israel Carlos Hernandez Garcia explained that this initiative was in  celebration of 30 years of friendship and diplomatic relations between Spain and Israel.

 

 

Guests were also greeted by Mercedes Sanchez, Madrid Tourism Market Manager for North America, France, Italy and Israel, and Maria del Carmen Pita Urgoiti, Promotional Director for the region of Galicia.

 

 

Chef Centeno, of the Michelin-starred restaurant Maruja Limón in Vigo, and Chef Goya of Triciclo, named among the top 10 tapas bars in Madrid, each prepared two tapas from their restaurants’ menus.

 

 

Following the demonstration, which was facilitated by Israeli Chef Victor Gloger of Chloelys in Ramat Gan, guests were able to taste these tapas, accompanied by excellent kosher wine from Spain.

 

 

In the framework of Round Tables by American Express 2016 in Tel Aviv, Chef Centeno will be working in the kitchen of the kosher restaurant Liliyot, while Chef Goya will collaborate with Chef Gloger in Chloelys.

 

 

Round Tables in Israel is produced by restaurateur Yair Bekier, in association with the Karvat and Weiss Communications Agency.

 

 

Photo Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Israel Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra’s second concert for the 2016-2017 season offered an evening of “Hidden Treasures of the Orchestra”, a concert in which the soloists were all members of the orchestra. This writer attended the event on November 5th 2016 at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Shmuel Elbaz, the orchestra’s house conductor, directed the concert, briefly introducing the works on the program as well as the soloists.

 

The concert opened with J.S.Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.4, in which Daphna Itzhaki and Michal Tikotsky played the flute parts and concert master Gilad Hildesheim the solo violin role. In true Baroque style (but on modern instruments) most of the instrumentalists played standing rather than sitting. Vivid, graceful and buoyant, the Allegro movement set the mood for a lively performance, Itzhaki and Tikotsky’s playing delicately shaped and well-coordinated, with Itshaki’s echoing of Tikotsky in the Andante movement indulging in some tasteful ornamenting and gentle flexing. Following a couple of rough edges in his playing at the start, Hildesheim engaged in the ensuing violin sections splendidly and with some spontaneity (Brandenburg 4 has at times been referred to as a solo violin concerto!). Elbaz took the final seriously contrapuntal movement at a lively pace, its tempo nevertheless feeling comfortable and controlled, with direction that was clear and dynamic.

 

Composed when Antonin Dvořák was at the height of popularity in his native Czechoslovakia as well as in Austria, his Serenade in D-minor for winds, ‘cello and double bass opus 44 (1878) took him only two weeks to write. Bristling with Slavonic folk melodies, rhythms and harmonies – as in the sousedská (a calm Bohemian dance danced in pairs) in the wistful second movement – the score calls for two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, three horns, ‘cello and double bass, its sound world an association with the hearty sounds of the “harmonie” band, popular at the end of the 18th century.  Placed in a semi-circle around the stage, the NKO instrumentalists performed the work without the conductor; the players, watching each other closely, infused the work with freshness, energy and lightness, highlighting the unique timbral colours and textures offered by its specific instrumental combination. But, above all, the players created the work’s sense of well-being, its whimsy, its vigour and dynamic potential, as well as the jubilance of folk dances. Each player could be heard, with outstanding solos from oboist Hila Zabari-Peleg and clarinettist Igal Levin.

 

Then to Maestro Shmuel Elbaz’ solo – Antonio Vivaldi’s Concerto in C-major for mandolin and orchestra. Despite the fact that, of Vivaldi’s very many concertos, this is the only concerto for one mandolin, the composer’s writing sits very well with the instrument. And Elbaz brought out the colour, directness and vigour inherent in Venetian art, with orchestra and mandolin engaging in layered, Baroque-style dynamics. His easeful playing bristled with energy, his skilful ornamenting, at times quite florid, never concealing the melodic line. In the Adagio movement, he wove the fragile filigree strands of its arpeggios into a pensive mood piece. A little less microphone amplification would have sufficed…or perhaps none at all.

 

Prior to the next item, clarinettist Igal Levin recounted the curious story of how Felix Mendelssohn’s Konzertstück No.1 in F-minor for two clarinets and orchestra (the original version was for clarinet, basset horn and piano) came about. It was when Munich court musicians clarinettist Heinrich Joseph Bärmann and his basset hornist son Carl visited the Mendelssohn home in Berlin in 1832 that a deal was struck: the court musicians would roll up their sleeves and prepare the composer some Dumpfnudeln (steamed dumplings) and Rahmstrudel (sweet cheese strudel) if, while they worked in the kitchen, Mendelssohn would write them a piece for them to perform on their upcoming tour to Russia. Mendelssohn produced the work the same evening, only needing to add a few minor instrumental changes following its completion.

He orchestrated it three weeks later. The challenging score attests to the high quality of the two Bärmanns’ playing. The NKO’s performance featured clarinettists Igal Levin and David Lobera. A work of three brief movements, its scoring of double winds – flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns and trumpets – was indeed suited to the strengths of the NKO. Soloists and orchestra gave dedicated expression to the work’s hearty, lush Romantic textures, its drama and songful melodies, its tranquillity and agitation, with Levin and Lobera engaging in musical banter, speedy figurations and exuberant hell-for-leather runs.

 

Bringing the orchestra together to conclude the concert, we heard Josef Haydn’s Symphony No.96 in D-major, the first of his “London Symphonies”, erroneously named “Miracle” due to a near-catastrophe when a chandelier fell from the ceiling when Haydn was conducting Symphony No.102 in London in 1795. Elbaz led his orchestra in playing of substantial orchestral quality, of Haydnesque good humour and richness of contrasts.  

And there were plenty of solos here, too, some minor utterances, others more generous: the two principal violinists are featured in solo passages, as well as all principal wind players. In the Andante (2nd movement), the focus is indeed on the winds and first violin, the latter possibly a token of appreciation of Haydn to impresario Johann Peter Salomon, who, in addition to producing Haydn’s London concerts, happened to also be his concertmaster.  In the Trio of the Menuetto (3rd movement) we once again heard outstanding oboist Hila Zabari-Peleg in an eloquent rendering of the Ländler. 

 Altogether, Maestro Elbaz and the NKO presented Haydn’s light, expressive scoring and appealing earthiness, bringing to an end an evening of fine music, in which the orchestra’s treasures certainly did not remain hidden!

 

 

Photo: Maestro Shmuel Elbaz (photo: Natan Yakobovich)

 

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The Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv will host between December 19, 2016 - January 13, 2017 the exhibition of paintings and drawings entitled "In the children's world".

The exhibition will feature works created by children from the Israeli community of Romanian origins, ages 5-12 years, and will take place under the theme of fantasy. The event will be dedicated to celebrating the Hanukka and Christmas holidays.

The registration period for the works is November 9-17, 2016, Monday -Thursday, from 09:00-17:00, and Friday, from 09:00-14:00.

Terms of participation:

  • The works should be submitted in A3 or A4 format, painting or drawing
  • The works will be submitted only in original, by bringing them to the RCI Tel Aviv office (8 Shaul Hamelech Blvd., 6th floor), and should respect the theme of the exhibition - "fantasy"
  • The call for applications is addressed to the members of community of Romanian-born Israelis
  • The age group is 5-12 years
  • The work will be submitted with the complete name and age of the artist
  • Works sent after the registration period or on another format than the one specified will not be accepted

The program of the exhibition:

November 9-17, 2016 - Call for applications at RCI Tel Aviv

November 18 - The selection of the works - it will be made by RCI Tel Aviv and Israeli artist of Romanian origin Livia Kessler, member of the Artistic Association Tseva Bateva

December 19, 2016 - January 13, 2017 - The exhibition "In the children's world" at RCI Tel Aviv

 

 

About  Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the holiday that marks the beginning of the Jewish year, is in the Hebrew month of Tishrei, which coincides with late September and early October.

 

Unlike the other holidays, which have one holy day on which businesses are closed, Rosh Hashanah is a two-day holiday, and businesses are closed on both days. The holiday is two days according to tradition started in the Diaspora when the onset of the new moon – which traditionally was decreed by the High Court in Jerusalem – was not known.

 

According to Jewish tradition, Rosh Hashanah commemorates the culmination of the creation of the universe and acceptance of God’s sovereignty over the world. These are also the days on which God judges people’s deeds throughout the year and decides their future for the coming year - death for the sinners, life for the pious and a repentance period until Yom Kippur for people whose status is uncertain.

 

The period between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur is called “The Ten Days of Repentance,” during which people have the opportunity to atone for their sins.

 

Holiday Customs

Prayer - Religious Jews attend lengthy synagogue services, and recite special prayers and liturgical songs written over the centuries. The versions of the prayers and liturgical songs vary slightly from one ethnic group to another.

 

Selichot (special penitential prayers) - During the week (or month, depending on the ethnic group) prior to Rosh Hashanah there are special “Selichot” prayers, requesting forgiveness and expressing remorse and repentance.

 

The blowing of the shofar (ram’s horn) - On Rosh Hashanah, 100 (or 101, depending on the ethnic tradition) shofar blasts are sounded in the synagogue, in single, triple and nine-blast groupings. The shofar blasts are intended to symbolize God’s sovereignty over the world, to remind Jews of the giving of the commandments on Mt. Sinai, of Abraham and Isaac’s devotion to God, to arouse people to repentance and to herald the Day of Judgment and the coming of the Messiah. When the first day of Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat, the shofar is sounded only on the second day.

 

Apple and honey - At the evening meal on Rosh Hashanah it is customary to eat an apple dipped in honey and other sweet foods to symbolize a sweet new year.

 

Tashlich - On Rosh Hashanah afternoon it is customary to walk to a river, lakeshore or other open body of water, to shake out one’s pockets and symbolically cast one’s sins into the water. If you come to Israel during this period, it is worth going to see religious Jews performing this custom. When the first day of Rosh Hashanah is on Shabbat, Tashlich is performed on the second day.

 

New year greetings - Until a few years ago Jews in Israel (and around the world) used to send “Shana Tova” greeting cards to their friends and relatives wishing them health, happiness and prosperity for the new year. Today this custom has all but disappeared, as most Israelis prefer to use the telephone or e-mail. One way or the other, it is customary for Jews to wish everyone they meet during this New Year period a “Shana Tova” - a good new year.

 

Holiday meal - Even secular Jews who do not go to synagogue services have a holiday meal on the Rosh Hashanah evening, with fine wine, apple dipped in honey and other sweet dishes. It is customary to eat pomegranate, as a symbol of a plentiful year, the head of a fish, symbolizing the desire to keep ahead, and other symbolic foods.

 

 Important Information

If you come to Israel during this period, take into account that  there are two consecutive holy days during which businesses are closed. It is worth visiting a synagogue to hear the prayers, and don’t be taken aback if you are greeted with “Shana Tova.”

 

More info

 

 http://www.goisrael.com/Tourism_Eng/Pages/home.aspx

 Photo Goisrael.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Height of Joy  (על ראש שמחתי)

 

Art Inspired by a Jerusalem View 

 

 Boutique Hanevi’im, Jerusalem

A collaboration with the Jerusalem Biennale for Contemporary Jewish Art

 

In the weeks before Sukkot, a dozen renowned Jerusalem-based artists were invited to create artworks, inspired by the breathtaking views over the Old City from the windows and balconies at the Boutique Hanevi'im project. During Hol Hamoed Sukkot, the public is invited to an exhibition of the artworks - and to enjoy the views - in the Boutique Hanevi'im penthouse apartment. 

 

Among the participating artists:

Lenore Mizrachi-Cohen, from the Syrian community in Brooklyn, NY, who is currently on an artist-in-residency program with the Jerusalem Biennale

 

Motta Brim, the haredi artist who was the inspiration behind Akiva in the series Shtisel

 

Debbie Kampel, a South-African born artist now living in Alon Shvut whose work is currently on display in a Jerusalem Biennale exhibition in Manhattan

 

Where: Boutique Hanevi’im, 25 Hanevi’im St. Jerusalem

When:  October 18-20, 2016, from 10:00-19:00.

Free admission.

 

Meet Jerusalem Biennale founder and director Ram Ozeri, who will talk in English about plans for the third Jerusalem Biennale for Contemporary Jewish Art, taking place October - November 2017.

Where: Boutique Hanevi’im, 25 Hanevi’im St. Jerusalem

When:  October 18, 2016, 17:30

 

Background material:

The Jerusalem Biennale for Contemporary Jewish Art, which was inaugurated in 2013, is dedicated to exploring the spaces in which contemporary art and the Jewish world of content intersect. It is a stage for professional artists, Jewish and non-Jewish, religious and secular, who create today and refer in their work to Jewish thought, spirit, tradition or experience.  The third Jerusalem Biennale will take place during October-November 2017 in various locations around the Jerusalem city center under the theme: Watershed.

 

The unique and exclusive Boutique Hanevi'im project by Azorim, one of Israel’s largest construction companies, features a seven-storey residential building with 87 units ranging in size from two to five rooms and spacious penthouses, most of which have balconies overlooking the Old City or the modern urban landscape. Residents benefit from maximum privacy, a high technical specification and smart technology, underground parking, storage room and may enjoy the various services of the boutique hotel on its entrance level, including room service, a concierge and an especially high level of maintenance.

 

Photo courtesy  Lydia Weitzman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hallel Carmel Bezalel Exhibition

Curator: Yona Shapira

"Judaica Now!":  Goblets and Kiddush Cups of the Bezalel School

 

Curators: Dr. Shirat-Miriam Shamir and Ido Noy

The Rishon Le-Zion Museum

Ahad Haam 2, Rishon Le-Zion

Opening: Thursday, September 29, 2016, 7:30pm

 

Participating artists:

O. Roth Merav│ Ofir Arie│ Epstein Anna│ Biran Avi│ Ben-Ari Michal│ Goldschmidt - Kay Merav│ Gilboa Rinat│ Dahan Israel│ David-Shoham Aviya │ Hooper Rory│ Herman Rosenblum Eden│ Vardi Nimrod│ Zahavi Reuven│ Zilberman Noa │ Chen Attai│ Tutnauer Iris│Tarazi Ezri│ Tripp Noa │ Cohavi Malka│ Lavian Ariel│ Matityahu Yossi │ Nir Orly │ Naim Yifat│ Sevinir Rebecca │ Segal Zelig Z"L│ Srulovitch Sari│ Friedman Amir │ Parnas Haim│ Zabari Moshe│ Rosenthal Lena│ Resheff Maya │Shur Amit

 

Program:

7:00-7:15pm. Reception

7:30pm. Welcome and opening remarks

Mr. Dov Zur - the mayor of The Rishon Le-Zion

Nava Kessler –Rishon Le-Zion Museum Director

" Winery Club " – "fun" , singing and dancing on the tables as in the original winery club in Rishon-Le-Zion.

The exhibition runs until March 18, 2017.

 

Tours of The Rishon Le-Zion Museum are available in groups to be booked in advance  in: Hebrew, English, Russian, Spanish.

 

Opening hours:

Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 09:00-14:00,

Monday 09:00-13:00, 16:00-19:00,

Every first Saturday of the month 10:00-14:00

 

https://www.facebook.com/ArtCollecting?ref=hl

 

Location:

2 Ehad Haam st., corner of Kikar HaMeyasdim (the Founders' square),

Rishon Le-Zion, 03-9598890, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 Flyer provided by  Dr Shirat Miriam Shamir

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 50th Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival, under the direction of Hanna Tzur, will take place from October 20th to 24th 2016. Concerts will be performed at the Church of the Ark of the Covenant, on the hill of Kiryat Ye’arim (appropriately called the Town of Forests), and in the 12th century Crusader Church Crypt that nestles among the mature pine trees of a magical garden in the lower area of Abu Gosh. (The historic town of Abu Gosh is located 10 kilometers west of Jerusalem.) In the words of festival director Hanna Tzur: “Twice a year the village of Abu Gosh becomes a paradise for vocal music-lovers, who come in their thousands from all over the country and turn Abu Gosh and its churches into a colourful vocal locale of festivities”.

 

For a pre-festival treat on a very different note, to take place on Thursday October 20th, many of the finest accordionists around will perform folk music in six locations in and around the Kiryat Ye’arim Church.

 

As in each Abu Gosh Festival, music-lovers will be able to hear several great works of choral repertoire – Brahms’ “German Requiem” (Concert no.2), for example, will be performed in its original form for choir, soloists and two pianos and will feature the Chamber Choir of the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance (Director: Stanley Sperber). In “Brilliant Baroque with Bach and Caldara from Venice” (Concert no.4) the Tel Aviv Chamber Choir (director Michael Shani) will be joined by soloists Yeela Avital, Gòn Halevi, Doron Florentin and Guy Pelc. For “Pergolesi - Stabat Mater” (Concert no.5), the program also including the Fauré “Requiem”, the Barrocade Ensemble will be joined by fine soloists and the Bat Kol and Maayan Choirs (director: Anat Morahg.) In Concert no.6, Hanna Tzur herself will conduct soloists, the Ramat Gan Chamber Choir and the Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra in Puccini’s “Messa di Gloria”, also works of Verdi and Kurt Weill. The Moran Ensemble (director: Naomi Faran) and soloists will perform “Mendelssohn Gloria, Schubert Magnificat” (Concert no.7); selections from J.S.Bach’s “St Matthew Passion” can be heard in “Bach - Requiem for a Prince”, with Ron Zarhi directing soloists and instrumentalists in Concert no.9.

 

An auspicious event of the 2016 Fall festival will be the world premiere of Sicilian Baroque composer Michelangelo Falvetti’s oratorio “Nabuco” in its complete form (Concert no.8), performed by Ensemble PHOENIX with vocal soloists. Working with musicologist Fabrizio Longo, PHOENIX founder and director Dr. Myrna Herzog has put together the first reliable score of the work for this ground-breaking event. A renowned Baroque violinist, Fabrizio Longo will also be joined by soprano Einat Aronstein, Avid Stier (harpsichord) and Myrna Herzog (viola da gamba) in Concert no.14 in the Crypt to play works of Vivaldi, Banchieri and Vivaldi.

 

Regularly performing at Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festivals, members of the Meitar Opera Studio of the Israeli Opera, accompanied by studio director, arranger and pianist David Sebba, will present “Carmen in Abu Gosh” (Concert no.10), a program of opera gems, French Classical works and French chansons. Other events will also offer a mix of classical- and non-classical works: “Paul McCartney, Paul Simon, Henry Purcell” (Concert no.16) with countertenor Gòn Halevi and guitarist Eyal Leber and “An Exciting Meeting Between Jazz and Classic” (Concert no.15), featuring soprano Sharon Dvorin, with guitarist Uri Bracha and bassist Oren Sagi.

 

Other festive fare will include a concert of music from East and West (Concert no.11), with singer, oud player and violinist Yair Dalal and sitar player Yotam Haimovich, “The Virtuosi” (Concert no.12) in which accordionist Emil Aybinder and mandolin artist Shmuel Elbaz with perform music from Armenia, Macedonia, Romania, Russia and Hungary as well as a Piazzolla work, Concert no. 1 – Mikis Theodorakis’ oratorio “Canto General”, with alto Silvia Kigel and the Kibbutz Artzi Choir conducted by Yuval Benozer; also “From the Andes to Copacabana” (Concert no.13) in which mezzo-soprano Anat Czarny will be joined by Tamar Melzer-Krumlovsky (recorders) and guitarist Erez Yaacov.

 

This festival will host members of the Simvol Very Men’s Choir (Russia). Conducted by Pnina Inbar and Seraphim Dubnov (Concert no.3) they will sing works of Dvorak, Rachmaninov, Tchaikovsky and arrangements of Russian folk songs in a joint program with the (Israeli) Naama Ensemble.

 

In the Abu Gosh Festival’s relaxed atmosphere, concert-goers can also enjoy informal outdoor concerts, browse the craft stalls and picnic with friends in the tranquil setting of the Judean Hills.

 

www.agfestival.co.il/en

 

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 Photo: Berthold Werner

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Towards the Jewish New Year, the Embassy of India has organized  Bollywood beach party.  

 

The party will take place on September 29, 2016 at Frishman Beach, Tel Aviv from 20:00- Midnight

 

 

The program includes:

 

20:00-21:45 Indian Bollywood dance party

 

Bollywood dance workshop with the accomplished talented dance instructor and choreographer Yael Tal

 


21:45 - Screening of the Indian movie: Tanue weds Manu

 

https://youtu.be/I9MW6t_pyh0

 

The Frishman beach restaurant will offer a special Indian menu for the great occasion.

The entrance is free of charge

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/1776661972579632/

 

 

Payment for food & beverage on the basis of personal orders.

 

 See you all at the party!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

The Israel Chamber Orchestra opens its 2016-2017 concert season with J.S.Bach's Mass in B-minor

 

The Israel Chamber Orchestra opened its 2016-2017 season - “Colors Worth Hearing” - with J.S.Bach’s Mass in B-minor BWV 232. The work was conducted by Ariel Zuckermann, the ICO’s musical director. Soloists were soprano Claire Meghnagi, alto Avital Dery, tenor Eitan Drori and bass Raimond Nolte (Germany). Joining them was the Chamber Choir of the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance (director: Stanley Sperber). This writer attended the concert at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art on September 13th 2016.

 

Johann Sebastian Bach spent the last years of his life in Leipzig compiling parts of previously-composed works, mostly from his cantatas (the practice of “parody”) into his last great composition – the Mass in B-minor. Composed over 15 years, certain sections had been performed, but less than a year after completing it, Bach died, never to hear it performed in its entirety. Not only does the work include Bach’s study of several musical styles – coordinating style of the past and the future in the High Baroque, stile antico and the Galant style - its spiritual agenda would subtly but surely have some connection with the history of his own personal religious dilemmas as a Lutheran and his position regarding Lutheran Protestantism of his day.

 

With Zuckermann’s performance of the B-minor Mass, we are not talking about performance on period instruments or of Joshua Rifkin and Andrew Parrott’s one-to-a-part approach for the singing of choruses. An ambitious undertaking, the work is so universal that what is essential to any conductor taking on the challenge is to understand how perfect the piece is and how to present its detail, its fusion of styles and its meaning, which extends far beyond that of a sacred Baroque work. In my opinion, performing and hearing the B-minor Mass presents as much interest for instrumentalists as it does for singers; Zuckermann led his orchestra in playing that was secure, supportive, articulate and elegant. We heard some splendid playing from the wind sections and there were several beautifully rendered obbligato parts enriching the various arias.  The Jerusalem Academy Chamber Choir, boasting four strong sections, gave crystal-clear expression to fine detail, complex melodic strands and the work’s extensive use of counterpoint. At times, the choral sopranos tended to emerge a little too dominant. The fragmenting of words in the opening Kyrie, probably in the name of clarity, was somewhat baffling. In contrast to the vibrant energy of some of the more dramatic choruses, with the choir’s enunciating of consonants energizing phrases and meaning, the subtle and moving expression in such choruses as the “Qui tollis” (Gloria), the “Credo in unum Deum” (Credo) or in the colliding, tragic dissonances of the “Crucifixus” (Credo) was hauntingly cushioned in lush, velvety harmonies.

 

Vocal solos and duets were dealt with well, if not always grippingly. Claire Meghnagi and Avital Dery’s very different styles and timbres did not make for felicitous dueting. Meghnagi and Eitan Drori found more common ground in the “Domine Deus”, with Drori and flute obbligato compatible in the “Benedictus”. Guest bass-baritone Raimond Nolte’s singing was attentive, his upper register pleasingly mellifluous. But, of all the soloists, it was alto Avital Dery who was the most engaging in her truly outstanding interpretation, her communication with the audience and her highlighting of the profound emotional content of each aria. With Maestro Zuckermann’s interest in articulacy, the most complex, multi-layered contrapuntal textures were never unintelligible under his direction. He led all in a performance that bristled with freshness, poise and luxuriance.

 

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Photo: Felix Broede

 

 

 

 

 

One of the opening events for the 2016-2017 concert season was that of the “Octopus” Israeli piano quartet on September 10th in the Recanati Auditorium of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. Guest artists were oud player Taiseer Elias and actor Alex Ansky.

 

Formed in 2013, “Octopus” consists of four pianists playing on two pianos – piano 1: Yifat Zeidel and Bart Berman, piano 2: Tavor Guchman and Meir Wiesel.  The ensemble’s aim is to promote high quality arrangements of classical works and to encourage and perform new Israeli works, having so far performed works by Josef Bardanashvili and Eran Ashkenazi. The September 10th concert included the world premiere of Tzvi Avni’s “Metamorphosis” (2016), a work for oud and four pianists.

 

The concert opened with Paul Klengel’s 8-hand arrangement of Johannes Brahms’ Serenade No.2 in A-major opus 16. A work originally scored for winds, ‘cellos and double bass, written by the young Brahms as a work to provide him with experience in orchestral writing prior to embarking on the composition of symphonies, Klengel’s setting works incredibly well on two pianos. In a balance of restraint and finely “orchestrated” expression, the “Octopus” artists drew out the work’s innate mellowness, so Brahmsian in temperament - the darker piano timbres reminding us that the original score includes no violins. As they re-created the work’s solid, full-bodied sound world and seamless melodiousness, the work’s dance movements and its folk-like scherzo, the artists fashioned as one player the work’s centrepiece - the poetic Adagio non troppo - in singing, tender resonance. Adding an extra dimension and throwing light on Brahms’ personal emotional life, the Serenade movements were punctuated by actor Alex Ansky’s reading of excerpts from letters of Brahms  from Shimshon Inbal’s lofty Hebrew translation of “Brahms: His Life and Work” by Karl Geiringer: letters effusive with love to his mother and Clara Schumann, a jolly description of his birthday celebration and quite a heartrending account of Robert Schumann’s dying in letters to his friend Julius Otto Grimm; also a self-effacing, letter to violinist Joseph Joachim, showing admiration for the violinist’s compositions.

 

Taking Max Reger’s lesser-known but rich piano transcription of J.S.Bach’s Toccata & Fugue in D-minor BWV 565, Meir Wiesel adapted it to the 8-hand “Octopus” constellation. Dousing the opening chords in a ringing effect of the sustaining pedal was a reminder of the grand church pipe organ and church acoustic, but from there, we were returned to the possibilities offered by two modern grand pianos. Comparing organ and piano timbres here would be a pointless exercise; using the physical strength demanded of the modern pianist, the artists presented the work’s drama of large dimensions; its pared-down, more intimate sections came across with pleasing articulacy. As to the work’s daring and pomposity, referred to as “famosissimo” and “celebratissima” by Alberto Basso in his 1979 Bach biography, that is what the work is about, and the audience loved it.

 

Performer, scholar and researcher Taiseer Elias, one of the world’s leading soloists in the field of classical Arab music, founded and has headed the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance’s Department of Eastern Music, leading the Arab-Jewish Orchestra; he also teaches at Bar-Ilan University. At the Tel Aviv concert, we heard Professor Elias in solo on the oud in improvisations and variations on “The Pretty Maiden”, an Arabic folk melody.  Elegant, virtuosic and succinct, Elias’ poetical playing produced a kaleidoscope of east and west – the song melody richly ornamented, then dovetailed with sections based on western harmonies, including a reflection on the Bach Toccata and Fugue performed prior to the solo. The use of a microphone allowed listeners in the hall to enjoy every filigree detail to the full.

 

An auspicious item on the program was the world premiere of “Metamorphosis”, a work by Israeli composer Tzvi Avni (b.1927) for oud and 8 hands on two pianos. Professor Avni spoke briefly about the piece’s genesis. When Meir Wiesel approached him in July 2016 with the suggestion of a new work for “Octopus” and oud, Avni had just finished reading Kafka’s novella “The Metamorphosis”, in which Gregor Samsa wakes one morning to find he has turned into a large, monstrous insect. The novella proceeds to deal with Gregor’s attempt to deal with the situation and to his family’s attitude to the repulsive creature he has become. Avni makes no effort to write the story into the work, but has taken from it the theme of coping, of finding solutions to a given situation, such as living in Israeli society, where east and west meet. Avni’s opening gesture in “Metamorphosis” takes the form of an imposing and uncompromising piano cluster. Then, in writing that is both pleasing and appropriate for the instrument, we hear the oud in its own musical agenda. Dialogue between pianos and oud oscillates between the docile and the conflicted. Following a long, engaging oud solo, the pianos enter once more, accompanying the oud in velvety textures, the strumming of piano strings at one moment meeting the oriental plucked instrument in a spacy, otherworldly effect. In this new work, Tzvi Avni has met and juxtaposed the most unlikely of instrumental combinations, coupling them on an intensely human level in a musical language of the senses, in a piece bristling with interest and with timbral appeal.

 

The program concluded with Emil Kronke’s 8-hand setting of Franz Liszt’s Hungarian Rhapsody No.9 “Carnival in Pest”. With its blend of folk melodies and virtuosic passages, connected by improvisatory elements, the work evokes the atmosphere of a Budapest carnival from around 1840. Indulging in the constant changes of mood and “scoring”, the pianists gave a dazzling performance of the work’s Hungarian dance melodies, addressing its intimate moments and its elaborate, colourful finale - a challenging tour-de-force. Then for two encores: Aram Khachaturian’s unleashed “Sabre Dance”, well suited to the 8-hand medium, followed by a somewhat sober rendition of Beethoven’s “Turkish March”. “Octopus”, its members spanning a wide range of ages, offers the concert-going public a new, fresh approach to concert repertoire in playing that is both tasteful and most stylish!

 

 

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Photo: Ilan Shapira

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dalia Coldham – The Ball

Exhibitions – 22.8 - 1.10.2016

The Cocktail Reception, Thursday, 8.9.2016 at 19:00

Curator: Udi Rosenwein

Purchase: tel-054-4315166

Opening hours: Sunday – Thursday: 08:30-20:30

Friday: 08:30-12:30 (and on nights when shows are scheduled in the Opera house)

 Shaul Hamelekh Blvd. 27, Tel Aviv
 
 
 
 
 
Photo Dalia Coldham
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The unique discovery provides new information regarding murals in Roman Palestine. While the earliest mosaics discovered at the site date to around 200 CE, the ancient frescoes precede them by about a hundred years and are thus of great importance.
 
 
A team from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has discovered hundreds of fragments belonging to frescoes from the Roman period, in the Zippori National Park. The fragments, which contain figurative images, floral patterns and geometric motifs, shed light on Zippori (Sepphoris), which was an important urban center for the Jews of the Galilee during the Roman and Byzantine periods.
The discovery was made this summer in the excavations at Zippori, in memory of Ursula Johanna and Fritz Werner Blumenthal of Perth, Western Australia. The excavations are directed by Prof. Zeev Weiss, the Eleazar L. Sukenik Professor of Archaeology at the Hebrew University's Institute of Archaeology.
 
 
The frescoes decorated a monumental building that was erected in the early second century CE north of the decumanus, a colonnaded street that cut across the city from east to west and continued to the foot of the Acropolis. The building, whose function is not clear at this stage of excavation, spread over a wide area, and the nature of the artifacts discovered indicate that it was an important public building. In the center of the building was a stone-paved courtyard and side portico decorated with stucco. West and north of the courtyard, several underground vaults were discovered. Some of these were used as water cisterns and were of high quality construction. The monumental building was built on the slope and the vaults were designed to allow the construction of the superstructure located on the level of the decumanus.
 
 
The monumental building was dismantled in the third century CE for reasons that are unclear, and was replaced by another public building, larger than its predecessor, parts of which were uncovered during this season. The monumental building's walls were dismantled in antiquity and its building materials — stone and plaster, some colorful — were buried under the floors of a newly established Roman building on the same location. Hundreds of plaster fragments discovered during this excavation season were concentrated in one area, and it seems that they belong to one or several rooms from the previous building.
 
 
The patterns on the plaster fragments are varied and are decorated in many colors. Among them are geometric patterns (guilloche) and brightly colored wall panels. Other fragments contain floral motifs (light shaded paintings on red backgrounds or various colors on a white background).
 
 
Particularly important are the pieces which depict figures — the head of a lion, a horned animal (perhaps a bull?), a bird, a tiger's hindquarters and more — usually on a black background. At least one fragment contains a depiction of a man bearing a club. Research on these pieces is in its early stages but it is already clear that at least one room in the building was decorated with figurative images, possibly depicting exotic animals and birds in various positions.
 
 
 
The population of Zippori prior to the Great Revolt against the Romans was not very large, and archaeological finds dating to this period are particularly notable for the absence of figurative images – both humans and animals. The construction of the Roman city of Zippori after the Great Revolt, in the late first century and the second century CE, is indicative of a change in the attitude of Galilean Jews toward Rome and its culture. The city gained the status of a polis thanks to its loyalty to Rome during the Great Revolt, and constructed monumental public buildings, as befit a polis, that stood out in the urban landscape. This building boom also included the monumental building discovered north of the decumanus whose walls were decorated with frescoes, and whose remains were discovered during this season.
 
 
 
The new finds in Zippori contribute significantly to the research of Roman art in Israel. To date, excavators uncovered the walls of several public and private buildings from Roman Zippori (second and third centuries CE) which were decorated with colorful frescoes in geometric and floral patterns. This season’s finds are the first, only and earliest evidence of figurative images in wall paintings at the site. The finds date to the beginning of the second century CE. Parallels to these finds are virtually unknown at other Israeli sites of the same period. Some panels bearing depictions of figures were discovered a few years ago in Herod’s palace at Herodium, and according to Josephus (Life of Josephus 65-69) the walls of the palace of Herod Antipas in Tiberias were also decorated with wall paintings depicting animals; but beyond that, no murals with depictions of figures, dating to the first century and the beginning of the second century CE, have been discove red to date in the region.
 
 
 
The discovery in Zippori is unique and provides new information regarding murals in Roman Palestine. Zippori is well known for its unique mosaics. The newly discovered frescos are now added to the city’s rich material culture. While the earliest mosaics discovered at the site date to around 200 CE, the ancient frescoes precede them by about a hundred years and are thus of great importance.
 
 
These finds raise questions relating to their socio-historic background. Who initiated the construction of the monumental building that was discovered north of thedecumanus? Who is responsible for choosing the patterns that adorn the walls, and for whom were they intended?
 
 
The various finds uncovered throughout the site indicate that Zippori, the Jewish capital of the Galilee, was home to many Jewish inhabitants throughout the Roman period, but the city also had a significant pagan community for which the temple was built to the south of the decumanus, opposite the monumental building, parts of which were discovered this season. It is difficult to determine who was responsible for the construction and decoration of this monumental building, at this stage of excavation. However the new finds clearly reflect the multi-cultural climate that characterizes Zippori in the years following the Great Revolt, in the late first century and the second century CE.
 
 
 
About the Excavations at Zippori
 
 
Most of the archaeological work conducted in Zippori since 1990 was led by the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. This team worked both on the Upper Hill as well as in an area to the east. The Hebrew University team revealed a well-planned city built around an impressive network of streets. Various buildings, public as well as private, were built in the city which existed throughout the Byzantine period. Among the public buildings uncovered are a Roman temple, bath houses, a theatre, two churches, and a synagogue.
 
 
Over 60 mosaics dating from the 3rd to 5th centuries CE have been uncovered to date in Zippori, in both public and private buildings. The mosaics include numerous rich and varied iconographic depictions, ranking the city among the most important mosaic centers of the Roman and Byzantine east. The assortment of finds that have come to light in the course of the excavations provides a wealth of information about this multifaceted urban center, allowing one to draw significant conclusions about this Hellenized city’s demographic composition, architectural development, and everyday life, as well as the cultural relationships between the various communities residing in Zippori during the first centuries of the Common Era.
 
 
 
 Photo Guilloche, in a fresco from Zippori, dating from the early Second Century CE.
Photo: G. Laron.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

An Impressive 1,600 Year Old Pottery Workshop where Jars were Manufactured was Exposed in the Western Galilee

 

The kiln, used to fire the jars, is the only one known to date in the country to have been hewn entirely in bedrock. It was exposed in archaeological excavations of the Israel Antiquities Authority prior to the construction of a new residential quarter north of the new Yaʽarit neighborhood that is being built at the initiative of the Israel Lands Administration and the Shlomi Local Council

 

A workshop where jars were produced 1,600 years ago (Roman period) in which there is a unique kiln used to fire the vessels was revealed in archaeological excavations of the Israel Antiquities Authority in Shlomi. The excavations are being carried out prior to the construction of a new neighborhood at the initiative of the Israel Lands Administration and the Shlomi Local council.

 

The kiln was discovered during the course of a large archeological expedition that has been going on for the past six months in which hundreds of young people from the north have volunteered, particularly students of the Shchakim High School of Nahariyya and Ort High School of Qiryat Bialik.

 

According to Joppe Gosker, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, “What makes the pottery works so special is its unique kiln, which was hewn in bedrock and is unlike most of the kilns known to us that were built of stone, earth and mud.  The ancient workshop included a system for storing water, storage compartments, a kiln, etc.”. Gosker added, “The kiln was meticulously constructed. It consisted of two chambers – one a firebox in which branches were inserted for burning, and a second chamber where the pottery vessels were placed that were fired in the scorching heat that was generated.  The ceramic debris that was piled up around the kiln indicates that two types of vessels were manufactured here: storage jars that could be transported overland, and jars with large handles (amphorae) that were used to store wine or oil which were exported from Israel by sea”.

 

According to Anastasia Shapiro, a geologist with the Israel Antiquities Authority who is researching the production of pottery vessels, “We can explain the quarrying of this rare kiln right here because of the special geological conditions found in the area of Shlomi: here there is chalk bedrock, which on the one hand is soft and therefore easily quarried, and on the other is sufficiently strong to endure the intense heat”.   

 

A large part of the Bat el-Jabal antiquities site, where the pottery workshop was exposed in Shlomi, is slated to be an archaeological park that will be open for the benefit of the residents of the new neighborhood and the public in general.  Archaeological surveys performed there have documented remains of a royal structure with a gate – probably from the Late Roman period, which coincides with the use of the pottery workshop. In addition, remains of the walls of buildings were identified that probably date to the Byzantine period, and as in the case of the unique kiln their builders took advantage of the natural stone in order to hew high foundations in the bedrock.

 

Photo

  1. Joppe Gosker, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, inside the pottery workshop’s water reservoir in Shlomi. Photographic credit: Royee Liran, Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Israel’s Cinematheques, Indian Embassy, Host Satyajit Ray Retrospective

 

 

The cinematheques of Tel Aviv, Jerusalem and Haifa are screening the works of famed Indian film director Satyajit Ray, from July 24 through August 8, 2016. The retrospective is organized with the assistance of the Embassy of India in Israel, the  Satyajit Ray Film Archives, and the Department of Information and Cultural Affairs of the Government of West Bengal.

 


Satyajit Ray (1921–1992), a native of Calcutta who is widely regarded as one of the greatest filmmakers of the 20th century, directed 36 films. His first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including the inaugural Best Human Document award at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival. This film, along with Aparajito (1956), and Apur Sansar (The World of Apu) (1959) form The Apu Trilogy. In 1992, Ray was awarded an honorary Oscar for his life work from the U.S. Academy of Motion Pictures.

 


Visiting film director and former Member of India’s Parliament Mr. Shyam Benegal is inaugurating the retrospective, at the invitation of Cinematheque and the Indian Embassy.

 


Prior to the retrospective, the Cultural Attache for the Embassy of India, Mr. Debashish Biswas, invited a select group of journalists and bloggers to his home in Tel Aviv. The invitees enjoyed a lunch of delicious homemade Indian food with his family and then heard details of the Satyajit Ray festival.

 


Mr. Biswas told his guests that Satyajit Ray is the only Indian to have won an Academy Award.

 


The schedule of screenings is as follows:



FILMS Length TLV JLM HAIFA
Pather Panchali 1955 123 24/7 21:15 25/7 26.7
Aparajito 1956 110 25/7 19:00 26/07 28.7
Apur Sansar 1959 105 27/7 19:00 27/07 29.7
Jalsaghar 1958 95 26/7 21:00 03/08 30.7
Ganashatru 1989 99 29/7 16:00 04/08 31.7
Ghare Baire 1984 140 30/7 17:00 06/08 1.8
Aguntuk 1991 97 31/7 21:00 08/08 2.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Musrara School of Art is a unique institution; a visit to exhibitions of 2016 graduates

 

The Musrara School of Art was founded in 1986. Located in the heart of a neighbourhood straddling East- and West Jerusalem and representative of the city’s multi-culturalism, the Musrara-Naggar School of Art is spread over two locations – a historic, 19th century Arab building and Canada House - the neighbourhood community centre. The school’s five departments – Photography, New Media, New Music, Visual Communication and Phototherapy – encourage alternative creativity in an atmosphere of collaboration between the teachers and the some-150 students.  Strongly committed to involvement with Musrara residents and the community in general, the school operates educational projects for prisoners, special needs children and high school students; it also holds Jewish-Arab seminars. One of the school’s many projects is “Forty-Something” – a program offering people with full-time jobs the opportunity to study twice weekly for two years, with participants combining studies in still photography and video, computer programming and more.

 

At the conclusion of three years’ study at the Musrara School of Art, students exhibit their work in the various rooms of the school. On July 18th 2016, Motti Cohen, the school’s director of Extramural Studies and Educational Programs, showed a small group of journalists through some of the many exhibitions of this year’s graduating students. What became clear from the outset was that all the exhibits combined different media and techniques. The eloquent, interactive exhibit of Daniel Bassin, a graduate of the New Media Department, combines photography, video and a sound-sensitive dimension. Bassin is interested in the poetic dimension of public spaces and in the potential of technology when used to serve as an artistic tool. Entering the space housing Omri Daniel’s disquieting interactive installation, one is surrounded by a number of fans loudly blowing volumes of cold air to operate the visuals on screens, these being faces of dead people – some familiar public figures - returning to life. Vasily Parshin’s detailed, copious photo project focuses on a paranoid woman who photographs people she believes to be following her. Parshin’s exhibit, raising questions in the viewer’s mind, is the result of his following her through the streets in the town where she lives and even observing her in her apartment by means of a hidden camera.

 

Sarah Yassin’s photographic exhibit “Three Houses, Four Walls” documents  three houses with which she is familiar: the first is a house in the northern town of Arabe, where she was born and grew up, the second is her grandmother’s house in the same location and the third, the house on the Mount of Olives where she lodged during the three years in which she was a student at the Musrara School of Art. In touching honesty, the pictures convey Yassin’s different sentiments to each house and to the austere authenticity and tradition of the simple dwellings.

 

Of the “Forty Something” students, there were a number of exhibits: Shai Knaani’s confrontational exhibit consists of large, somewhat disturbing “trance” photos of himself taken in the home setting, in some of which he is bandaged, suggesting suffering or age-related aspects. Tali Romem’s delicate and subtle prints, inspired by what she observes near her home in Jerusalem, focus on nature and the seasons. Iris Chetritt’s artistic statement, expressed in a variety of techniques, is indeed seen through the eyes of a woman, with works dealing with personal change and sometimes influenced by her work as a hairdresser.  Coming closer to a huge chandelier hanging low enough for the viewer to scrutinize, one perceives that Chetritt has assembled it from numerous synthetic disposable gloves, of the kind worn by hairdressers when dyeing hair!  In the entrance hall of the main building, we viewed the work of Jerusalem photographer Meir Reuven Zalevsky. Focusing on the subjects of time and the Jewish Sabbath, his exhibit presented several pictures of the Sabbath table and traditions; especially interesting is his video film showing a Jerusalem street in gradual change on a Friday afternoon as the residents and  time dimension slowly move into the Sabbath.

 

In an experimental and analytical study stream loop, Celli Lichman, a graduate of the Department of New Music, presented a video-sound project showing him singing in a spontaneous manner, with the addition of other sound layers of mostly vocal sounds.

 

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

 

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

Photo: Tali Romem

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish Dance Troupe Delights Israeli Audiences

 

The visiting Larreal Dance Troupe from Madrid performed its program Estampas de Espana (Portraits of Spain) before an enthusiastic crowd at the Herzliya Center for the Performing Arts last night. The Larreal troupe of the Mariemma Royal Professional Conservatory of Dance, who arrived in Israel this month to participate in the annual international Karmiel Dance Festival, are also giving a series of performances in Israel’s major cities.  

 


The show depicts the character of the country through its legacy of dance spanning the centuries. Among the traditions represented are baroque, Spanish classical, the folk dance genre known as “jota” -- and, of course, flamenco. Naturally, there is liberal use of the unique staccato rhythms of castanets, by both men and women dancers.

 


The opening number featured impressive choreography to the Iberia suite by Albeniz; also on the program was a creative interpretation to the familiar strains of the music of venerable composer Domenico Scarlatti.

 


The audience insisted on an encore of the particularly colorful and rousing finale.

 


Larreal will perform Estampas de Espana two more times this weekend: on Saturday night, 23.7, at the Jerusalem Theater in the capital, and on Sunday night in Haifa. Tickets may be purchased at

 

http://bimotglobal.co.il/en/portfolio/larreal-estampas-de-espana/

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

The Carmel Quartet's commented concert series closes the season with discussion and performance of Beethoven's opus 131 String Quartet

 

“Literary Notes IV” was the fifth and last of the Carmel Quartet’s 2015-2016 commentated concert series “Strings and More”. This writer attended the English language concert/lecture on June 15th at the Jerusalem Music Centre, Mishkenot Sha’ananim. Founded in 1999, members of the quartet are Rachel Ringelstein (1st violin), Yonah Zur (2nd violin), Yoel Greenberg (viola) and Tami Waterman (‘cello).  The quartet performs internationally and has been the recipient of prizes and awards. Its debut CD, including quartets and quintets of Paul Ben-Haim, was issued by Toccata Classics (2014).

 

This event focused on Ludwig van Beethoven’s String Quartet in C-sharp major opus 131. Written 1825-1826, (its sketches occupying three times as many pages as the finished work itself) the C-sharp minor quartet was the composer’s last large-scale composition and considered by Beethoven as his greatest. Not heard in public till 1835 (Beethoven died in 1827) some private performances took place prior to the premiere, including one for Schubert on his deathbed.  Dr. Yoel Greenberg, a faculty member of Bar-Ilan University’s Department of Music, spoke about Beethoven, the work and its influence on other musicians and art forms, namely cinema; he also shared his own thoughts on the work. Greenberg opened with discussion of the work’s eccentric aspects, as were typical of Beethoven’s later writing, such as the expressive but not especially comfortable key of C-sharp minor for string players and the work’s unconventional proportions – seven movements of various lengths and played with no breaks between them. Here, Beethoven, summarizing his experiments directs the flow towards the end of the piece, taking diversity, forming a coherent unity from it, and, with motivic links, has the final section alluding to the work’s opening fugue. We were reminded of what British philosopher John Stuart Mill (1806-1873) had said about outstanding people – that they should behave in eccentric ways. To illustrate this idea, we then saw a few moments of “Back to the Future” III.

 

Following the intermission, the Carmel Quartet gave a richly detailed and articulate performance of the work, their contemplative playing of the opening Adagio (referred to by Wagner as “surely the saddest thing ever said in notes”) imbued with the colours of shifting chromaticism and contrapuntal intensity. Following the sunny, somewhat quizzical-sounding Allegro second section, the third section – here one moment, gone the next – issues in the Theme and Variations, set in the key of A-major, its simple melody referred to by Wagner as the “incarnation of innocence”. The artists dispelled any hint of simplistic scoring as they presented the rich variety of the 4th movement (theme and variations) -  its hocket (the melody divided between the violins), a march, its “lullaby” section, its majestic waltz, its bizarre moments and its sublimity, with the variations becoming progressively more complex. Strangely issued in by the ‘cello, the Presto movement is a hell-for-leather journey, its trio less frenetic, the coda less than conventional in its otherworldly sul ponticello sounds.  The sixth section was intensely poignant (Greenberg spoke of its melody as having a “Jewish” theme, evocative of the “Kol Nidre” melody, claiming, however, that Beethoven would probably not have been familiar with Jewish music) leading into the last section, a scene of musical utterance that is wild, confrontational but also noble. Of the final section Wagner wrote: “This is the fury of the world’s dance – fierce pleasure, agony, ecstasy of love, joy anger, passion and suffering…”

 

There are few string quartets more complex or enigmatic than Beethoven’s opus 131. A challenging work for players and listeners alike, Yoel Greenberg took the bull by its horns and threw light on the many elements and interest making up the work…no mean feat, and the audience was with him all the way.  And yet the music itself remains baffling, defying words. It takes an ensemble of the calibre of the Carmel Quartet to finish off the lecture with Beethoven’s own personal explanation – the sounds themselves. It was an enriching, thought-provoking musical event to wind up the season.

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

Photo:carmelquartet.com 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Romanian soprano Andreea Soare at the Jerusalem International Opera Master Class, July 31 – August 10, 2016

 

The Jerusalem International Opera Master Class, organized by the Jerusalem Municipality, will take place between July 31st -August 10th , 2016 at the Louis and Tillie Alpert Youth Music Center, Mishkenot She'ananim Music Center and the Gerard Bechar Center in Jerusalem.

 

With the support of the Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv, soprano Andreea Soare will be present at the event as a vocal coach and will work with the students attending the program. As part of the concert program, Andreea Soare will perform at the opening concert on July 31st and will deliver a master class of vocal technique on August 2nd.

 

Events open to the public:

Sunday, 31.07.2016, at 19:00, Mishkenot Sha'ananim Music Center: Opening concert. The musical program will include arias from important operas, performed by: Andreea Soare (Romania, National Opera of Paris), Andjei Beletsky (Russia, Bolshoi Theatre), Magda Mkrtchyan (Armenia, National Opera of Erevan), Moises Molin (Spain, Madrid Opera). Piano: Sonia Mazar (Israel, New Israeli Opera)

 

Monday, 01.08.2016, at 17:00, The Louis and Tillie Alpert Youth Music Center: The Jerusalem International Opera Master Class Competition

 

Tuesday, 02.08.2016, at 19:00, The Louis and Tillie Alpert Youth Music Center: Master Class of vocal technique delivered by renowned soprano Andreea Soare (Romania)

 

Wednesday, 03.08.2016, at 19:00, The Louis and Tillie Alpert Youth Music Center: Master Class delivered by pianist and conductor Fabio Mastrangelo (Italy)

 

Thursday, 04.08.2016, at 19:00, The Louis and Tillie Alpert Youth Music Center: Bel Canto Concert performed by the students participating in the program.

 

Sunday, 07.08.2016, at 19:30, Leo Model Hall -Gerard Bechar Center: production of the opera "Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini, in Italian with Hebrew surtitles. With the participation of conductor Fabio Mastrangelo (Italy).

 

Monday, 08.08.2016, at 19:30, Leo Model Hall -Gerard Bechar Center: production of the opera "Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini, in Italian with Hebrew surtitles. With the participation of conductor Fabio Mastrangelo (Italy).

 

Tuesday, 09.08.2016, Harmonia Cultural Center (27 Hilel St.): Night of Rising Stars - the opera "Le Nozze di Figaro" by W.A. Mozart. With the participation of conductor Alex Wasserman (Israel).

 

Wednesday, 10.08.2016, at 19:30, Gerard Bechar Center: Gala concert. The musical program will include arias and opera duets.

 

Tickets and more information : 050-2335529, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or 02-6241041 (box office of the Mishkenot Sha'ananim Music Center )

 

Romanian soprano Andreea Soare (https://andreeasoare.wordpress.com/) has been a member of the Opéra National de Paris L'Atelier Lyrique programme since 2011. Prior to this she trained at the Conservatoire National de Région de Strasbourg and the Conservatoire de Paris, as well as the European Academy of Music, Festival d'Aix-en-Provence. She is the recipient of the lyrical Cercle Carpeaux prize, Arop prize, "Les amis du festival d'Aix en Provence" and HSBC award.

 

She made her debut at l'Opéra national de Paris in 2012 in La Cerisaie by Philippe Fénelon, playing a young girl, and has since performed the role of Henriquetta di Francia I Puritani in a production directed by Laurent Pelly and conducted by Michele Mariotti. She has made her UK debut singing the role of Fiordiligi Cosi fan tutte for Garsington Opera.

 

Recent highlights include the roles of Maddalena- La Resurrezione de Haendel at the Amphitheatre Bastille, Sandrina- La Finta Giardiniera at the MC93 in Bobigny, Silvia in Haydn's l'Isola Disabitata and Clarice- Il mondo della luna, conducted by Guillaume Tourniaire, both at the Opéra National de Paris. Past roles also include First Lady -Die Zauberflöte, Sandrina- La Finta Giardiniera, Pamina- The Magic Flute, Countess- The Marriage of Figaro. On the concert platform, highlights include Poulenc's Stabat Mater at the 'Festival de la Chaise-Dieu' and Mozart's Coronation Mass and The Seven Last Words of Christ by Haydn at the Festival Septembre Musical de l'Orne in 2012.

 

The Jerusalem International Opera Masterclass (http://www.jiom.org.il/index.html) aims to promote opera and classical music through the organization of advanced specialist training aimed at singers with top musical skills and a strong technical foundation. The international summer programs offer a wide range of intensive studies in vocal technique, style and interpretation, languages and diction, movement and stagecraft, role preparation and career development. The 2016 summer program will include the fully staged production of Puccini's "Tosca" and Mozart's "Le nozze di Figaro", concerts and public master-classes, given by distinguished guest artists, including Andjei Beletsky,(bass-bariton, voice teacher, Bolshoi Theatre, Nova Opera), Andreea Soare (soprano, voice teacher, Opéra National de Paris), Fabio Mastrangelo (conductor and pianist, the Mariinsky Theatre, the Arena di Verona Theatre, Artistic Director of the international St Petersburg festival Opera for All. Artistic Director and Conductor of the St Petersburg Music Hal), Aleks Kagan (stage director, Stuttgart Opera House, Ulm Theatre), Magda Mkrtchyan (Yerevan National Academic Opera Theatre of Opera and Ballet, Berlin Concert House), Larisa Tetuev (vocal coach, the New Israeli Opera), Sonia Mazar (vocal coach, pianist, The New Israeli Opera, The Jerusalem Music Academy of Music and Dance) and others.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oscar prizes ceremony of social media stars for the first time in Israel

 

For the first time in Israel the Shorty Stories Tel Aviv was held on Saturday night in conjunction with Vibe Israel organization. Shorty awards and Vibe inside presented prizes for outstanding video content creators for the web.

 

On July 9th 2016, Vibe Israel was hosted for the first ever Shorty Stories Tel Aviv, at the Bascula Art Center in Tel Aviv, the exclusive event was held in the presence of 300 guests including local opinion leaders and online creators in the fields of social media, digital marketing advertising and TV.

 

Vibe Israel is a non-profit organization leading initiatives to strengthen Israel’s brand in the world. We are here to create a new conversation about Israel, from a conversation about a conflict, to a conversation about innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship.

 

In 2015, Vibe Israel bought the exclusive rights to bring the Shorty Stories format to Israel- a new monthly event series from the creators of the Shorty Awards, featuring an influencer or content creator who is making a career out of the internet.

 

The keynote speaker of this exciting event was Thomas Sanders, winner of the Shorty Awards for Best Viner of 2015. Florida-born singer and actor, Thomas is taking Vine and YouTube by storm. Between stage performances and TV appearances, he still finds time to interact with his 10 million followers every day!

 

 

 

 

 

To celebrate the Shorty Stories, Vibe Israel took part in two more leading international social media stars, also with millions of followers.

 

To sign off the shorty Stories Tel Aviv event, Vibe Israel presented awards honoring local online content creators.

 

The Vibe Israel Awards was awarded to:

 

         The most influential local content creator reaching out to an Israeli audience is Kutiman (Ofir Kutiyel).

 

         The most influential local content creator reaching out to a global audience is Vanya Heymann.

 

         The next generation- The most influential local content creator under 18 is Roy Edan.

 

         Original You- The most original local content creator is Aviya Pri-Mor.

 

 

 

 

The three winners recieved a flight to New York (generously sponsored by El Al), room and board and a VIP ticket to the Shorty Stories.

 

The Vibe Israel Award Committee is comprised of Israeli leaders in technology, creative marketing and content creation, business and culture, including:

 

  • Enon Landenberg  Chaiman

  • Omri Marcus

  • Eran Gefen

  • Dror Globerman

  • Hillit Whalberg

  • Neta Reich

  • Yaniv Waizman,

  • Eliad Amar

  • Ran Telem.

 
 
 
 

 

 

 

Trio Noga presents works of women composers at the Felicja Blumental Music Center, Tel Aviv

 

Trio Noga’s recent intensive concert tour of Israel presented works of women composers. Interestingly, all three artists of Trio Noga – flautist Idit Shemer, ‘cellist Orit Messer-Jacobi and pianist Maggie Cole (UK, USA) – are well-known performers on today’s Baroque music scene; Trio Noga, however, sees them performing music from the Classical period and up to the most contemporary of works. This writer attended “Celebrating Women in Music”, the second concert in the chamber music series of the Israeli Women Composers and Performers Forum at the Felicja Blumental Music Center, Tel Aviv, on June 12th 2016.  Representing the Forum, recorder player Inbar Soloman offered words of welcome.

 

The program opened with Trio Sonata No.1 by Marion Bauer. Born in Washington to a French Jewish family, composer, teacher, writer and critic Marion Eugénie Bauer (1882-1955) was something of a Renaissance woman. Professor Bauer was especially supportive of American music and modern composers, she was the first woman on the Music Faculty of New York University, with affiliations with the Juilliard School and other educational institutions; she spent 12 summers in the creative environment of MacDowell Colony for composers, artists and writers. Her prolific writing on music addressed both specialists and general readers and she was the author of five books. Despite brief forays into 12-tone music in the 1940s and 1950s, Bauer’s music did not plumb the depths of atonality, rather focusing on the mix of coloristic harmony and gentle dissonance. The opening movement of Trio Sonata No.1 was coloured with Impressionistic musical language, its second movement was eloquent and touching, to then be followed by a playful third movement (Vivace e giocoso).

 

Most of the works of French Romantic composer and pianist Cecile Chaminade (1857-1944) were published during her lifetime. Primarily a concert pianist, she wrote over 100 piano works and toured the world performing them with great success. In 1901, she was one of the first pianists to record for the gramophone, with seven sides of her works, and she was the first woman composer to become a member of the French Légion d’Honneur. Like Marion Bauer, however, she also suffered from criticism based on gender prejudice. On hearing an orchestral work written by Chaminade at age 18, composer Ambrose Thomas remarked: “This is no woman composer, this is a composer who happens to be a woman.” Chaminade composed Trio No.1 opus 11 in g-minor opus 11 (the flute part played by Idit Shemer originally written for violin) at age 23. The Trio Noga artists gave expression to the composer’s compositional prowess, the piece’s charming Gallic flavour and the influence of Romantic composers on its style – Brahms, possibly Schumann, and others.  Following their intense and emotional reading of the Allegro movement and the lyrical, almost vocal Andante, the rondo constituting the third movement (Presto), bristling with thirty-second notes and cross rhythms, was performed with buoyant optimism as each instrument presented its own agenda. The final movement, classically oriented, nevertheless takes the listener through some late-Romantic harmonic twists. With the piano part illustrative of Chaminade’s own piano mastery, the ‘cello here initiated many of the melodies. With “salon music” viewed as third class entertainment, Chaminade’s music has been sadly ignored. Capturing the work’s moods, melodic richness and elegance, Trio Noga has proved what a misjudgement this was.

 

Making the concert an especially auspicious event was the premiere of a work by Israeli composer Hagar Kadima. “By a Doorway” (2016) was commissioned by Trio Noga. A winner of the 2003 Prime Minister’s Award for Composers, Hagar Kadima (b.1957) was the first Israeli woman to earn a PhD in Composition. A professor at the Levinsky College of Education (Tel Aviv), she has spent many years teaching young composers and has been dedicated to collaboration between Arab and Jewish women musicians. In 2000, Dr. Kadima founded the Israeli Women Composers’ Forum, serving as its first chairperson, continuing to devote time and effort in supporting women composers and integrating them into the Israeli musical scene. At the Blumental Center Concert, she talked about the new piece, its genesis being the interval of a minor third – viewing it from all angles – as the piece moves between states of chaos and order. Another element making up the work is Israeli composer Yohanan Zarai’s setting of Avraham Halfi’s “The Ballad of Three Cats” (a nonsense poem whose subtler meaning touches on the subject of loneliness), the song itself announced by the flute, its melody also beginning with a minor third.  Listening to Kadima’s work, Trio Noga’s reading of the work created a sense of curiosity, guiding the listener into closely following the course of the various sections, each different in mood and intensity, each inspired by the simple, unadulterated minor third, always to return to it only to find a new path of departure.  The three instruments, though engaging in much imitation, seemed to have their own agendas as the artists gave a dedicated reading of the piece. Hagar Kadima spoke of her search for simplicity in music. Clarity would certainly run a close second!

 

In 1839, Clara Schumann wrote: “I once believed that I possessed creative talent, but I have given up this idea; a woman must not desire to compose…” One of the 19th century’s most outstanding and influential musicians, she would go on to compose over 30 works – character pieces for piano, a concerto, Lieder and three romances for violin and piano. (In the 40 years she outlived her husband, she hardly composed, focusing more on family and her performing career.) Her only chamber work, the Piano Trio in g-minor opus 17, however, composed in 1846 when she was 27, showing the influences of Robert Schumann and Mendelssohn as well as her in-depth study of Bach counterpoint, is considered her finest work. With the flute (Idit Shemer) taking the place of the original violin part, the Noga Trio artists gave full expression to the work’s mid-century Romantic style texture with its interweaving of lines and sweeping ardent melodies, its coquettish Scherzo, its emotional agenda and the fugal writing in the final movement, their playing a careful balancing of forces, their textures never turgid or in excess, as they highlighted Clara Schumann’s skilful writing and ingenuity and the intimate nature of chamber music.

 

A concert of fine performance introducing the Israeli concert-goer to works not generally heard and a new work of an Israeli woman composer.

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

  Photo: Lilach Amos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bizet’s The Pearl Fishers for the Television Age

 

The Israeli Opera’s current performance of The Pearl Fishers (Les Pêcheurs de Perles) by Georges Bizet -- the first time this opera has even been presented in Israel -- is guaranteed to be an unforgettable operatic experience, if only thanks to the audacious staging of guest director Lotte de Beer.

 

The entire plot -- while faithful to the libretto -- is re-imagined as a TV reality show: “The Pearl Fishers -- The Challenge!”, complete with television director and crew as part of the cast (in non-singing roles).

 

The opening scene of the opera mimics the reality show Survivor, as Zurga is elected leader of the pearl fishers by votes of “viewers” -- actually the Israel Opera chorus -- watching television in their homes; the audience can see into “apartments” -- “inhabited” by a cross-section of Israeli society -- in the background of the stage. The voting device is reprised again at the end of opera, with the fate of doomed lovers Nadir and Leila in the balance.

 

The job of Nourabad, the high priest of Brahma, is transformed into that of a television presenter -- which works OK for announcing Zurga’s victory, but a bit less so when the lyrics he sings center on religious duties.

 

The incorporation of video in this production is put to its best use when displaying beautiful scenes of Ceylonese sunsets. Otherwise, the key to enjoying this opera is to listen to Bizet’s legendary music, including the well-known duet of Zurga and Nadir, and the tender, moving duet of Nadir and Leila.  

 

The soloists performing all four leading roles alternate each night, with conductors Steven Sloane and Ethan Schmeisser also switching off duties wielding the baton. The Pearl Fishers runs at the Tel Aviv Opera House through July 16, 2016.

 

http://www.israel-opera.co.il/eng/

 

The Opera House

19 Shaul Hamelech Boulevard
Tel Aviv 61332


Tel: +972-3-692-7777
Fax: +972-3-692-7733
 

Tickets can be purchased in person or by telephone, using credit cards (Isracard, Visa, Diners and American Express).

The box office is open: Sunday-Thursday 9:30 am – 8:30 pm
Fridays and holiday eves: 9:30 am – 1:00 pm
Telephone reservations from 8:30 am

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

World Quintet to Perform with the Israel Chamber Orchestra

 

The acclaimed contemporary Klezmer ensemble Kolsimcha - World Quintet will perform jazz and klezmer works with the Israel Chamber Orchestra this Wednesday, 6.7.16, in Tel Aviv. The concert, one in the ICO’s current World Music series, will take place in the museum’s Recanati Hall at 20.30.

 

The concert will feature works from World Quintet’s new program, performed and recorded with the London Symphony Orchestra in 2014. The ensemble, which was formed in 1986 in Switzerland, has performed to rave reviews in New York, London, Los Angeles, Frankfurt and other major cities on three continents.

The unique ensemble comprises:

 

Ariel Zuckermann, conductor and flautist

Michael Heitzler, clarinet

Olivier Truan, piano

Daniel Fricker, bass

Christoph Staudenmann, drums

 

 

https://youtu.be/9NQZuwq67Ag

 

Tickets may be purchased at the discounted price of NIS 110 (reduced from NIS 175) by calling the ICO box office at (03) 518-8845

 

or the Bravo box office at *3221.

 

They may also be ordered at the website http://kupatbravo.co.il/announce/52332. The discount code is 555.

 

 Photo   Olivier Truan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Verdi’s Rigoletto Highlights Italian Cultural Evening in Jerusalem

 

 

 

The annual Jerusalem Opera Festival, held last week at Sultan’s Pool, was co-sponsored this year by the Italian Embassy in Israel, which marked the occasion with a cocktail reception adjacent to the venue prior to the June 29 performance of  Rigoletto, by Giuseppe Verdi.

 


Guest were greeted by Ambassador Francesco Maria Talo, who introduced Italy’s Agriculture Minister Maurizio Martina, currently on a working visit to the country.  Minister Martina recognized Israel’s recent participation in Expo Milano and praised the ongoing relationship between Italy and Israel in the area of agritechnology,

 

Luciano Tommasi Head of Startup Initiatives and Business Incubator  ENEL , , a gold sponsor of the evening, announced its initiative of investing in Israeli hi-tech start-up companies, known for their innovation.

 

A table showcasing quality imported Italian foodstuffs was on display, in conjunction with food market organized by the Italian Trade Agency and the Sheraton Hotel in Tel Aviv. Other tables distributed samples of their products: Ferrero sweets, Pellegrino beverages, Aperol spirits, and wines and cheese of Lombardy  

 


The reception was catered by nearby kosher restaurant Eucalyptus, founded by Chef Moshe Basson, the doyen of Biblical cuisine in Israel. Chef Basson, who is a leader of Europe’s “slow food” movement, has a close culinary relationship with Italy: he is a cavaliere della repubblica -- a recipient of Italy’s Order of Merit; and he just returned from judging a vegan competition in that country.

 


Following the reception, guests attended the Israel Opera Company’s opening performance of this year’s Jerusalem Opera Festival, where they were welcomed by Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat. The stirring rendition of Rigoletto featured bravura performances by Boris Statsenko in the role of Rigoletto, Salvatore Cordella in the role of the duke, and Hila Fahima in the role of Gilda.

 

 

Photo by Yossi Zwecker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On June 21st, the Second International Yoga Day event took place at the historical site The Tachana Compound in Tel Aviv. The event was organized by the Embassy of India Israel, in collaboration with the Israeli Ministry of Culture & Sports, Ministry of Tel Aviv-Jaffa, the Israeli Yoga Teachers' Association and additional Yoga organizations.

 

During the 5 hours and a half event nearly 2,000 people attended the event. The event was launched by Deputy Ambassador DR. Anju Kumar. at 17:00. There were five simultaneous sessions around the Tachana, along with Indian stalls and food. The official Yoga Protocol session was conducted by a senior and acclaimed Yoga teacher from India Prasad Rangnekar.

 

The Ambassador of India in Israel Mr. Pavan Kapoor inaugurated the event with traditional lighting candles ceremony. Deputy Mayor of Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality and Shlmoit Nir Toor the Director of Sports for All & sport for women at the Ministry of Culture & Sports spoke at the occasion. The event ended with a cultural program by a local Indian singer Liora Yitzhak and Bharatnatyam dance.

 

 

 

 

Related article

http://www.diplomacy.co.il/diplomatic-magazine/art-culture/3484-embassy-of-india-in-tel-aviv-international-yoga-day-2016

 

 
Links for referrnace: 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Embassy of India in Tel Aviv "International Yoga Day 2016"

 

It feels like yesterday that International Yoga Day 2015 was celebrated on June 21 all over the world including in Israel. The day created such a celebratory and overwhelming environment that the aroma lingers on. It was as if the whole world got transformed into a Yoga platform and became a ground for journeys of individuals to the wholeness.

 

It may be recalled that June 21 has been adopted by the United Nations as the International Yoga Day as per a UN Resolution initiated by India. The Resolution was co-sponsored by 177 countries out of the total 193 member states of the United Nations.

 

The Indian Prime Minister Mr. Narendra Modi had launched the initiative stating that, “Yoga is an invaluable gift of our ancient tradition. Yoga embodies unity of mind and body, thought and action, restraint and fulfillment, harmony between man and nature, a holistic approach to health and wellbeing. It is not about exercise but to discover the sense of oneness with yourself, the world and the nature.” Yoga aims for holistic health, happiness and harmony.

 

Given the fervent response to the event last year which saw the participation of about 2000 yoga enthusiasts at the day-long celebrations in Tel Aviv as well as parallel Yoga sessions at several schools all over Israel, the Embassy of India in Tel Aviv is pleased to inform you that we intend to celebrate the International Yoga Day 2016 on an even larger scale.

 

This year, we are heartened to have the support of the Ministry of Culture & Sports of Israel, Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality and several yoga teachers in Israel practicing various streams of Yoga, including Ashtanga Yoga, Iyengar Yoga, Bhrigu Yoga, Shivananda Yoga, Children’s Yoga and Acro Yoga.

 

This year’s celebrations will be held at the Tachana, Tel Aviv on 21 June and are scheduled to commence at 16:45 hours. Apart from an official ceremony, the event would comprise of several Yoga sessions, Ayurveda lectures and therapies, mind relaxation exercises, special sessions for children, and an Indian cultural performance of dance and music.

 

Mr. Prasad Rangnekar, a Yoga teacher from India who has been a yoga practitioner for past 30 years will conduct a session at the event. Prasad regularly gets invited to speak around the world at prestigious institutions like the European Commission, various Yoga Festivals and corporate and social organizations.

 

As last year, we will be organizing parallel yoga sessions at several schools and institutions all over Israel.

 

There would also be stalls selling Indian food and drinks, spices, clothes and accessories.

 

Look forward to welcoming all of you to mark International Yoga Day 2016 at Tachana Tel Aviv with us.

 

Links to the event:


https://www.facebook.com/yogadayisarel/?pnref=story


https://www.facebook.com/events/1716476981970494/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Comedy of Love” or “Love as Comedy”, the Aeterna Jerusalem Theater of Chamber Opera’s newest production, took place in the recently opened Mikro Theatre of the Jerusalem Center of Performing Arts on May 24th 2016. Under the musical direction of Ilya Plotkin, the a-capella Musica Aeterna Choir was founded 20 years ago. Then, thirteen years ago, Maestro Plotkin established Opera Aeterna, its first production being “The Impresario” by W.A.Mozart.  The idea for the 2016 production, a combination of three of Italian Baroque music’s most popular comic intermezzo operas – Pergolesi and Paisiello’s settings of “La serva padrona” and Telemann’s “Pimpinone” -  was thought up by Maestro Plotkin. Eleanore Plot in was project director. The idea was realized in the hands of stage director Julia Plakhin. Costumes and sets were designed by Irina Tkachenko, with makeup by Helena Plotkin. Maestro Plotkin directed a competent chamber orchestra of strings players and continuo. Opera Aeterna, whose members (and much of the audience at this performance) are largely Russian-speaking immigrants to Israel, is supported by the “Keshet Omanuyot” Association, the Ministry of Absorption, the Center for Absorption of Immigrant Artists and Returning Residents and by the Gabriel Sherover Foundation.

 

How does one combine three operas on one stage? For a start, each presents the theme of the maid-mistress setting her sights at an older, gullible man and the consequences thereof, as inspired by Jacopo Angelo Nelli’s 1714 play “La serva padrona” (The Servant Turned Mistress). Opera Aeterna’s comic twist was to have all characters of both operas on stage. From “La serva padrona” there was not one but two Serpinas – Serpina I – soprano Shirelle Dashevsky, soprano II – soprano Julia Plakhin, with bass Andrei Trifonov as Uberto. From “Pimpinone”, Irina Mindlin played Vespetta, with baritone Dmitry Lovtsov in the role of Pimpinone. Opera Aeterna makes no practice of using surtitles in its productions, so, in addition to the traditional Italian characters of both operas, actor Yitzhak Peker assumed the (non-singing) role of narrator: he was the landlord of the house in which all these questionable, go-getter characters were living. In addition to explaining, commenting and constantly communicating with Maestro Plotkin, the landlord himself was also looking for love, thus also being involved in the romantic attractions and rejections all taking place in his house. And there was another new character on the scene - Stam-Coli (tenor Dmitry Semyonov) – the figure of the narcissistic pop singer. Where did he belong in the plot? Actually, nowhere for most of the performance, being so obsessed with himself, his looks, his image, his outfits and his microphone! If early 18th century composers had intended the “serva padrona” characters to represent real-life personalities, replacing commedia dell’arte characters, creating the figure of Stam-Coli was a brilliant touch.

 

 

 

At the left side of the stage we see Uberto’s studio with easel, palette and a few discarded empty bottles. Plants, a bench and an antique chair give the impression of a dwelling. Three large windows at the back of the stage allow the audience to see into other rooms of the house. The chamber orchestra and conductor occupy the right wing of the stage. The landlord enters, an abacus in hand to calculate rent owing to him, as Uberto threatens him. We were soon to realize that the evening’s musical bill consisted of some of the finest solos and duets from all three operas. The stage quickly became alive with action, with womanly wiles taking control and relationships complicating. Both Serpinas pine to rekindle their love with Uberto. Shirelle Dashevsky is coquettish, teasing and ebullient; she is so well suited to the opera buffa style and her well-oiled voice sails naturally through each phrase.

 

 

The other Serpina – Julia Plakhin – is vivacious and flirtatious, her vocal agility, musicality and feminine esprit serving her splendidly. But Uberto is not impressed and wants nothing of either of the competing female admirers; in this role, Andrei Trifinov’s richly resounding voice was as pleasing as his face was disgruntled!  Dmitry Lovtsov, dressed in pyjamas and an elaborate gold brocade dressing gown, was excellently cast as the foolish, elderly and lecherous Pimpinone. Irina Mindlin was a daring and promiscuous Vespetta, scheming, snide and quite the vixenish woman. She and Lovtsov pulled out all the plugs as they entertained the audience with their risqué humour, fine voices and superb musical presentation of Telemann’s masterful duets. And how droll it was to hear the shaky, dejected and finally disillusioned Pimpinone suddenly singing in Yiddish! As to the farcical Stam-Col, Dmitry Semyonov, his tenor voice smooth and easeful, had the audience chuckling at his eccentricity as he seemed to float on and off stage, his face fixed in a rapt expression, and sporting some over-the-top costumes. At one moment, he unexpectedly appeared in a Mexican outfit, complete with sombrero, singing the popular Mexican song “Cielito Lindo”. As narrator and the landlord, Yitshak Peker, although somewhat exotically clad, cut a pathetic, needy figure but, with all the “re-pairing” happening by the end of the performance, he finally managed to win his true love – Serpina I – Shirelle Dashevsky. Uberto had won the affections of the hard-to-get Vespetta. Stam-Coli and   Serpina II – Julia Plakhin found love in each other – an unlikely match…but, after all, this is opera! Only Pimpinone, looking pathetic hunched sadly behind the window, was to remain alone.  In a last spurt of energy, he sprang out, gun in hand, to seek revenge and get Vespetta’s money. There ended the performance, its main themes of money, the duplicity of women and the narcissistic singer interwoven in an evening of fine and truly comical operatic fare.

 

Photos: Daniel Zaman

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

 

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Comedy of Love” or “Love as Comedy”, the Aeterna Jerusalem Theater of Chamber Opera’s newest production, took place in the recently opened Mikro Theatre of the Jerusalem Center of Performing Arts on May 24th 2016. Under the musical direction of Ilya Plotkin, the a-capella Musica Aeterna Choir was founded 20 years ago. Then, thirteen years ago, Maestro Plotkin established Opera Aeterna, its first production being “The Impresario” by W.A.Mozart.  The idea for the 2016 production, a combination of three of Italian Baroque music’s most popular comic intermezzo operas – Pergolesi and Paisiello’s settings of “La serva padrona” and Telemann’s “Pimpinone” -  was thought up by Maestro Plotkin. Eleanore Plot in was project director. The idea was realized in the hands of stage director Julia Plakhin. Costumes and sets were designed by Irina Tkachenko, with makeup by Helena Plotkin. Maestro Plotkin directed a competent chamber orchestra of strings players and continuo. Opera Aeterna, whose members (and much of the audience at this performance) are largely Russian-speaking immigrants to Israel, is supported by the “Keshet Omanuyot” Association, the Ministry of Absorption, the Center for Absorption of Immigrant Artists and Returning Residents and by the Gabriel Sherover Foundation.

 

How does one combine three operas on one stage? For a start, each presents the theme of the maid-mistress setting her sights at an older, gullible man and the consequences thereof, as inspired by Jacopo Angelo Nelli’s 1714 play “La serva padrona” (The Servant Turned Mistress). Opera Aeterna’s comic twist was to have all characters of both operas on stage. From “La serva padrona” there was not one but two Serpinas – Serpina I – soprano Shirelle Dashevsky, soprano II – soprano Julia Plakhin, with bass Andrei Trifonov as Uberto. From “Pimpinone”, Irina Mindlin played Vespetta, with baritone Dmitry Lovtsov in the role of Pimpinone. Opera Aeterna makes no practice of using surtitles in its productions, so, in addition to the traditional Italian characters of both operas, actor Yitzhak Peker assumed the (non-singing) role of narrator: he was the landlord of the house in which all these questionable, go-getter characters were living. In addition to explaining, commenting and constantly communicating with Maestro Plotkin, the landlord himself was also looking for love, thus also being involved in the romantic attractions and rejections all taking place in his house. And there was another new character on the scene - Stam-Coli (tenor Dmitry Semyonov) – the figure of the narcissistic pop singer. Where did he belong in the plot? Actually, nowhere for most of the performance, being so obsessed with himself, his looks, his image, his outfits and his microphone! If early 18th century composers had intended the “serva padrona” characters to represent real-life personalities, replacing commedia dell’arte characters, creating the figure of Stam-Coli was a brilliant touch.

 

At the left side of the stage we see Uberto’s studio with easel, palette and a few discarded empty bottles. Plants, a bench and an antique chair give the impression of a dwelling. Three large windows at the back of the stage allow the audience to see into other rooms of the house. The chamber orchestra and conductor occupy the right wing of the stage. The landlord enters, an abacus in hand to calculate rent owing to him, as Uberto threatens him. We were soon to realize that the evening’s musical bill consisted of some of the finest solos and duets from all three operas. The stage quickly became alive with action, with womanly wiles taking control and relationships complicating. Both Serpinas pine to rekindle their love with Uberto. Shirelle Dashevsky is coquettish, teasing and ebullient; she is so well suited to the opera buffa style and her well-oiled voice sails naturally through each phrase.

The other Serpina – Julia Plakhin – is vivacious and flirtatious, her vocal agility, musicality and feminine esprit serving her splendidly. But Uberto is not impressed and wants nothing of either of the competing female admirers; in this role, Andrei Trifinov’s richly resounding voice was as pleasing as his face was disgruntled!  Dmitry Lovtsov, dressed in pyjamas and an elaborate gold brocade dressing gown, was excellently cast as the foolish, elderly and lecherous Pimpinone. Irina Mindlin was a daring and promiscuous Vespetta, scheming, snide and quite the vixenish woman. She and Lovtsov pulled out all the plugs as they entertained the audience with their risqué humour, fine voices and superb musical presentation of Telemann’s masterful duets. And how droll it was to hear the shaky, dejected and finally disillusioned Pimpinone suddenly singing in Yiddish! As to the farcical Stam-Col, Dmitry Semyonov, his tenor voice smooth and easeful, had the audience chuckling at his eccentricity as he seemed to float on and off stage, his face fixed in a rapt expression, and sporting some over-the-top costumes. At one moment, he unexpectedly appeared in a Mexican outfit, complete with sombrero, singing the popular Mexican song “Cielito Lindo”. As narrator and the landlord, Yitshak Peker, although somewhat exotically clad, cut a pathetic, needy figure but, with all the “re-pairing” happening by the end of the performance, he finally managed to win his true love – Serpina I – Shirelle Dashevsky. Uberto had won the affections of the hard-to-get Vespetta. Stam-Coli and   Serpina II – Julia Plakhin found love in each other – an unlikely match…but, after all, this is opera! Only Pimpinone, looking pathetic hunched sadly behind the window, was to remain alone.  In a last spurt of energy, he sprang out, gun in hand, to seek revenge and get Vespetta’s money. There ended the performance, its main themes of money, the duplicity of women and the narcissistic singer interwoven in an evening of fine and truly comical operatic fare.

 

Photos: Daniel Zaman

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

 

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The USA Ambassador Does it Again!

 

His Excellency Ambassador Dan Shapiro and his wife Ms. Julie Fisher outdid themselves at a reception they hosted at the embassy residence in Herzlia Pituach on Wednesday night. The occasion was the visit to Israel of the LGBTQ Mission arranged by the Jewish Federations of North America. Some 110 members of the LGBTQ community came to see the reality of Israel, to have a good time, and then to go home with their own tangible and factual impressions. The Ambassadorial couple opened their home to welcome the visitors and give them an opportunity to meet and socialize with their Israeli counterparts.

 

This is not the first (and probably not the last) time that the US embassy in Israel has kicked in to promote recognition and acceptance of the American and Israeli LGBTQ communities (and others, worldwide). At one similar event, a year ago, the Ambassador hosted a reception to honor Randy Berry, special envoy of the US State Department to the LGBTQ community who was visiting Israel. Not only are Ambassador Shapiro and his wife personally in favor of equality and liberty for the community, it is State Department policy of the present USA administration.

 

Ms. Fisher opened the formalities with a short welcome, adding her grateful thanks to all the people who worked hard to make the event such a success. She then called on her husband to address the guests. Ambassador Shapiro gave a moving speech in which he emphasized the importance of the gay pride events (this week in Israel) celebrating “… pride, tolerance, equality and acceptance … and the understanding that liberty and fundamental equal rights include the LGBTQ community. Gay rights are human rights”. He also made special mention of – and welcomed – Knesset member Michal Rozin and US Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (visiting from South Florida).

 

Following was a brief recorded video message from special envoy Ambassador Randy Berry, who sent warm regards and greetings to the crowd, recalling fondly his last visit to Israel, just before the United States Supreme Court declared that the right to marry, whether for same-sex or “mixed” couples, must be available to all. A historic judgement.

 

 

 

 

Ms. Ros-Lehtinen was warmly welcomed to the podium and made a very poignant speech. The stress was on the equality to which all sectors of all communities are entitled. (She happens to be Cuban-born, and reached the USA as a young girl in 1960.) “Ambassador Shapiro is the voice of the USA in Israel, a voice that embraces our shared values of democracy and freedom”. She also opened her heart and told the gathering of her son, a transgendered man. “My husband and I love him, whether as a woman or a man. We want to be there for our children’s happiness, so that they can live contented authentic lives”. Her sobering words brought reality to the struggles that LGBTQ communities worldwide still face.

 

Also addressing the gathering was Stuart Kurlander, the mover and shaker behind the JFNA mission to Israel. He thanked his friends, Ambassador Shapiro and Julie Fisher for their warm hearted support and for hosting the lovely event; and Ms. Ros-Lehtinen for her ongoing support of the State of Israel. “Our mission includes a broad mix of people from a broad range of fields …. [Here in Israel] we have created bonds that we know will last well into the future”.

 

The light-hearted atmosphere was enhanced by the wonderful weather and the generous buffet dinner, affording the guests the opportunity to mingle, greet old friends and make new ones.

 

The USA and its Ambassador to Israel are fine examples that other countries – especially Israel’s neighbors – would do well to follow. One day, maybe …

 

 Photo credit: "David Azagury, U.S. Embassy Tel Aviv"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 49th Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival to take place June 10th to 12th‏

 

The 49th Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival, under the direction of Hanna Zur, will take place from June 10th to 12th 2016. Concerts will take place at the Church of the Ark of the Covenant, on the hill of Kiryat Yearim (appropriately called the Town of Forests), and in the Crusader Church Crypt that nestles among mature pine trees of a magical garden in the lower area of Abu Gosh.

 

The Shevuot (Feast of Weeks) Festival will host the Oreya Choir from the Ukraine. Established in 1986, and directed by Alexander Vatsek, the prize-winning chamber choir of 32 voices will perform two concerts at the festival (10.6.’16, 11.6.’16), offering a wide range of music from Renaissance and Baroque to spirituals and modern works, as well as folk songs from the Ukraine and Moravia. Needing no introduction to Israeli- and Abu Gosh audiences, Ensemble Barrocade and the Israeli Vocal Ensemble, conducted by IVE director Yuval Benozer and with as host of very fine Israeli soloists, will collaborate to perform concerts of works by Händel, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Vivaldi, Marcello and Torelli (10.6.’16, 11.6.’16). Another festive event will be the performance of W.A.Mozart’s formidable (and incomplete) Great Mass in C-minor K 427; Hanna Zur herself will conduct soloists, the Ramat Gan Chamber Choir and players of the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra (11.6.’16). “Dvorak-Brahms-Jobim-Villa Lobos” (12.6.’16) – a concert of the very excellent Gary Bertini Choir (Ronen Borshevsky-conductor, Svetlana Kostova-soprano/pianist) will present music of composers who have taken inspiration from folk song repertoire. Conducted by Ron Zarhi and joined by the Upper Galilee Choir, a fine line-up of soloists will perform Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas” (12.6.’16); Keren Hadar will sing the role of the ill-fated Dido. It has become a tradition for up-and-coming young opera singers of the Meitar Opera Studio (Israeli Opera) to perform with their musical director conductor/arranger David Sebba at Abu Gosh festivals; in “Black Soul Voices (12.6.’16), they will present music of Kurt Weill and Gershwin, also a selection of gospel songs and spirituals.

 

 

 

 

In the intimate setting of the Crypt, “Voice and Flute with Yossi Arnheim” (11.6.’16) will feature Revital Raviv-soprano, Yossi Arnheim-flute and Irit Rob-piano in works of classical composers and Israeli composer David Zehavi. In “Amazing Grace – the most beautiful prayers” (10.6.’16) Irit Rob will also accompany alto Sigal Haviv in some of classical repertoire’s best-loved arias, a spiritual and Sasha Argov’s “In the Beginning”.

 

A treat for jazz fans in this Abu Gosh Festival will be an appearance of the virtuosic, sophisticated and international-touring Avishai Cohen Trio (Cohen-double bass/composer/singer, Omri Mor-piano, Itamar Doari-percussion). Not to be missed! “Tomash’s Blues” (11.6.’16), featuring two dynamic and multi-talented artists – actor/singer/musician Tomer Sharon and author/guitarist Yair Yona – will offer hearty entertainment in a program that will include some American evergreens as well as the cream of Israeli song repertoire. And for those of us inclined to indulge in a little sentimentality, soprano Hadas Faran Asia and guitarist Eyal Leber will gently walk us down memory lane in “Hallelujah – A Tribute to Leonard Cohen” (10.6.’16).

 

For festival-goers there to enjoy the outdoors, the Jerusalem Hills views and the pleasurable and relaxed holiday atmosphere, the Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival offers informal outdoor concerts in five locations around the Kiryat Yearim Church, some excellent craft stalls and an opportunity to picnic and meet friends.

 

http://agfestival.co.il/en

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il

 

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.co.il

 

 

 

The Museum of the Jewish People

 

Dr. Orit Shaham Gover

 

How does one plan a museum for the Jewish people? How can this extensive heritage be expressed in a limited gallery space? Where does the story begin, and where does it end? From which perspective do we convey this timeless saga? How do we portray the challenges and achievements that mark Jewish history? What is our purpose in telling this story, and what is the message we wish to impart?

 

Naturally, there is no one answer. So when the planning team of TheMuseum of the Jewish People considered these questions, it chose a distinct approach, creating a museum through which the complexities of the Jewish story could be revealed. The Museum of the Jewish People, comprised of the New Wing (2016) and new Core Exhibition (2019), addresses the various dimensions of Jewish existence, taking visitors on a fascinating journey through a unique and ongoing story. This journey is based on three key principles:

  • A pluralistic and all-encompassingapproach

The new wing offers inclusive representation of the magnificent mosaic that is the Jewish people, past and present. It recognizes all incarnations of Judaism, across geography and generations, free from both bias and dogma.

  • A celebration of creativity and renewal

The exhibitions offer a retrospect of the Jewish story and its implications on the Jewish present, using an approach that celebrates prosperity, creativity, cultural dialogue and an endless capacity for regeneration. In other words, while the darker moments in Jewish history are remembered, the Museum moves beyond “oy vey” and “gevald,” looking instead to the future with the promise of “hallelujah!”

  • Relevancy and identification

By interweaving the threads of past and present and illuminating the idea that we are all part of the greater Jewish story, the Museum promotes the concept that “This story is (also) my own.”

To this end, the new Core Exhibition of The Museum of the Jewish People will begin with the present — displaying, celebrating and opening up a dialogue around contemporary Jewish identity and culture. An entire floor — the largest in the Museum — is dedicated to this discussion, including performing arts (dance, theatre, film and television and music), literature, languages, modern art and Jewish contributions to world culture.

The second floor of the Museum considers the unique and ongoing story of the Jewish people, from time immemorial to the present. Here Jewish history will be viewed through a prism of parallelism, exploring both its light and shadows. Alongside difficulties experienced, emphasis is placed on the flowering of Judaism, on creativity, human and cultural dialogue and renewal.  The Museum maintains a pluralistic approach to all communities and individuals, without discrimination in regard to origin or gender. This floor concludes with the establishment of the Jewish state, which, as in the past, exists alongside another large Jewish center: United States Jewry.

At this point, visitor curiosity will awaken to the conceptual foundations — both cultural and religious — of the Jewish story, giving rise to the question, What does it mean to be a Jew? The third floor of the Museum will display universal elements of Judaism alongside ethnic religious elements, with an emphasis on the pervasive impact of the Bible on world culture.

At the heart of the Museum an open atrium will connect the three floors of the building. This space, which once displayed the persecutions and suffering of the Jewish people, will now be a bright space celebrating optimism and the Jewish capacity for hope. A sculpture of light will rise to the ceiling, symbolizing the Jewish belief in a better future.

Another innovation of the Museum is the introduction of original artifacts that will allow appreciation of actual objects that survived the test of time. The Museum’s curators have arranged both to borrow and acquire unique pieces from around the world that directly relate to the stories on display.

Planning of this new Core Exhibition will conclude at the end of 2016, construction and production will begin in early 2017, and the future Museum will open in 2019.

 

The New Wing

Opening in May 2016 — in advance of the new Core Exhibition — is a new wing of the current Museum. This new wing encompasses the spirit and vision of The Museum of the Jewish People, with four galleries that uniquely represent various aspects of pluralism, celebration and identification.

 

The Synagogue Hall – Permanent Exhibition

This gallery showcases in a new, exciting and thought-provoking manner the Museum’s prestigious collection of world-renowned synagogue models. The exhibition includes 21 models, each revealing the different functions of the synagogue: social gatherings, study, work and prayer. It depicts activities related to the synagogue including weddings and bar/bat mitzvahs, community functions, fundraising events and charity work and beyond. This one-of-a-kind display raises questions: How did creativity develop in synagogues over the years? Why do Jews congregate? Where will future Jewish communities converge?  

Alongside each model a ceremonial item originating from the synagogue or related community is displayed. These artifacts enhance the exhibition and our understanding of the cultural and artistic identity of each community. Additionally, this exhibition features an impressive stained glass window by the artist Friedrich Adler, c. 1919 Germany, as well as historical and contemporary Judaica, prayer books and various manuscripts from various periods.

In addition to the models and displays, the Synagogue Hall is rich in media. A large screen in the center of the gallery focuses on the three daily prayers — “Shaharit, Mincha, Ma’ariv” (morning, afternoon, evening); video artwork by the artist Ran Slavin is displayed in a mirror-encircled space showcasing 24 additional synagogues from around the world; four animated films in period settings illuminate distinctive gatherings in synagogues; and a humoristic film starring Israeli journalists Jacky Levy and Kobi Arieli describes the similarities and differences between Sephardic and Ashkenazi prayer.

Visitors are invited to participate in four interactive stations: Personal Prayer (from our database the visitor selects a prayer he empathizes with, and in return is invited to share a story or prayer of his own); Jewish Music in Synagogues (nine “piyutim” (hymns) are performed by renowned artists that allow the audience to travel to the locations where these piyutim were, and still are, sung); Synagogue Architecture (24 buildings representing architectural achievements in the history of the synagogue); and Interactivity for Children (children are invited to design and build their own synagogues).

 

This gallery celebrates creativity and renaissance in Jewish life and culture through the multifaceted lens of the synagogue.

 

Forever Young – Bob Dylan at 75

This special exhibition celebrates cultural and creative wealth, personified by the work of Bob Dylan, who, more than any other Jewish musician, has influenced 20th century culture. The enigmatic Bob Dylan is represented through films, images, posters, displays and a vast collection of his original music. His story is relayed through the revolution he generated, his influence on music and his connection to Judaism.

Via this exhibition original footage by Elliott Landy, the official photographer of Woodstock, will be seen for the first time in Israel. A twelve-minute documentary, “My Dylan” — produced especially for the exhibition — presents Dylan’s influence on Israeli music.

Acclaimed Israeli music editor Yoav Kutner, is the Artistic Director of the exhibition and the narrator of the exhibit’s audio guide.

“Forever Young” celebrates Judaism’s capacity for creativity, cultural dialogue and renewal through the unique and pervasive contributions of Bob Dylan.

 

Operation Moses: 30 Years After

This special media exhibition gives voice to those who personally experienced the immigration to Israel from Ethiopia. For the first time ever, this story will be told by those who lived it. Their voices will be heard, free from the influence of the society that received them.

The films’ director, Orly Malessa, was a child when she immigrated to Israel as part of Operation Moses. For this film she selected — from Beit Hatfutsot’s historic collection — stills taken by Doron Bacher in 1984 in Ethiopia. The incognito photos were then uploaded to a designated Facebook calling upon users to recognize themselves and their families. Through “comments”, “likes” and “tagging”, Orly was able to choose immigrants from all over Israel to represent the Ethiopian immigrant community and share its story, featuring each in a five-minute documentary film.  Together they render in first person the immigrants’ absorption into Israeli society, considering the ups and downs of a long, difficult and complex process.

Through the stories of individuals who made their way to and within a new country, this exhibition celebrates the ways in which individual voices come together to convey the great story of the Jewish people.

 

Heroes: Trailblazers of the Jewish People – A Permanent Exhibition for Children

Bravery is one of humanity’s most mysterious and complex attributes. It is often linked to overcoming fear or apprehension in times of war or in the face of adversity. Admired, the hero becomes a role model, and is often the central figure in stories, songs and epics, instilling in future generations a hero’s values.

 

The Jewish people understand that heroes come in many forms. This complexity is the foundation of this exhibition, which offers children a wide variety of heroes to whom they can relate.

 

This exhibition is comprised of eight categories of Jewish heroes throughout history: scientists, philosophers, revolutionaries, cultural giants, athletes, courageous individuals and economic leaders.

 

In this way children — and their parents — are encouraged to redefine those qualities that make a hero. They are alerted to various aspects of success, including conquering temptation, daring to think outside the box and going against the grain.  

 

This exhibition reflects Beit Hatfutsot’s commitment to emphasizing diversity in Judaism. It celebrates Jewish culture both throughout history and in the present day, laying the foundation for pluralistic expression of who and what is exceptional in the Jewish sphere.

 

Heroes: Trailblazers of the Jewish People is designed for children ages six-through-twelve and their parents. The gallery, designed as an open space that facilitates free movement, has fifteen interactive stations and six animated movies. Textual information appears alongside each hero in the exhibit, enabling parents to provide additional material to their children. The center of the open space is illuminated and ringed with both seating and iPads containing information about the 143 heroes represented in the exhibition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Museum of the Jewish People

 

Dr. Orit Shaham Gover

 

How does one plan a museum for the Jewish people? How can this extensive heritage be expressed in a limited gallery space? Where does the story begin, and where does it end? From which perspective do we convey this timeless saga? How do we portray the challenges and achievements that mark Jewish history? What is our purpose in telling this story, and what is the message we wish to impart?

 

Naturally, there is no one answer. So when the planning team of TheMuseum of the Jewish People considered these questions, it chose a distinct approach, creating a museum through which the complexities of the Jewish story could be revealed. The Museum of the Jewish People, comprised of the New Wing (2016) and new Core Exhibition (2019), addresses the various dimensions of Jewish existence, taking visitors on a fascinating journey through a unique and ongoing story. This journey is based on three key principles:

  • A pluralistic and all-encompassingapproach

The new wing offers inclusive representation of the magnificent mosaic that is the Jewish people, past and present. It recognizes all incarnations of Judaism, across geography and generations, free from both bias and dogma.

  • A celebration of creativity and renewal

The exhibitions offer a retrospect of the Jewish story and its implications on the Jewish present, using an approach that celebrates prosperity, creativity, cultural dialogue and an endless capacity for regeneration. In other words, while the darker moments in Jewish history are remembered, the Museum moves beyond “oy vey” and “gevald,” looking instead to the future with the promise of “hallelujah!”

  • Relevancy and identification

By interweaving the threads of past and present and illuminating the idea that we are all part of the greater Jewish story, the Museum promotes the concept that “This story is (also) my own.”

To this end, the new Core Exhibition of The Museum of the Jewish People will begin with the present — displaying, celebrating and opening up a dialogue around contemporary Jewish identity and culture. An entire floor — the largest in the Museum — is dedicated to this discussion, including performing arts (dance, theatre, film and television and music), literature, languages, modern art and Jewish contributions to world culture.

The second floor of the Museum considers the unique and ongoing story of the Jewish people, from time immemorial to the present. Here Jewish history will be viewed through a prism of parallelism, exploring both its light and shadows. Alongside difficulties experienced, emphasis is placed on the flowering of Judaism, on creativity, human and cultural dialogue and renewal.  The Museum maintains a pluralistic approach to all communities and individuals, without discrimination in regard to origin or gender. This floor concludes with the establishment of the Jewish state, which, as in the past, exists alongside another large Jewish center: United States Jewry.

At this point, visitor curiosity will awaken to the conceptual foundations — both cultural and religious — of the Jewish story, giving rise to the question, What does it mean to be a Jew? The third floor of the Museum will display universal elements of Judaism alongside ethnic religious elements, with an emphasis on the pervasive impact of the Bible on world culture.

At the heart of the Museum an open atrium will connect the three floors of the building. This space, which once displayed the persecutions and suffering of the Jewish people, will now be a bright space celebrating optimism and the Jewish capacity for hope. A sculpture of light will rise to the ceiling, symbolizing the Jewish belief in a better future.

Another innovation of the Museum is the introduction of original artifacts that will allow appreciation of actual objects that survived the test of time. The Museum’s curators have arranged both to borrow and acquire unique pieces from around the world that directly relate to the stories on display.

Planning of this new Core Exhibition will conclude at the end of 2016, construction and production will begin in early 2017, and the future Museum will open in 2019.

 

 

 

The New Wing

Opening in May 2016 — in advance of the new Core Exhibition — is a new wing of the current Museum. This new wing encompasses the spirit and vision of The Museum of the Jewish People, with four galleries that uniquely represent various aspects of pluralism, celebration and identification.

 

The Synagogue Hall – Permanent Exhibition

This gallery showcases in a new, exciting and thought-provoking manner the Museum’s prestigious collection of world-renowned synagogue models. The exhibition includes 21 models, each revealing the different functions of the synagogue: social gatherings, study, work and prayer. It depicts activities related to the synagogue including weddings and bar/bat mitzvahs, community functions, fundraising events and charity work and beyond. This one-of-a-kind display raises questions: How did creativity develop in synagogues over the years? Why do Jews congregate? Where will future Jewish communities converge?  

Alongside each model a ceremonial item originating from the synagogue or related community is displayed. These artifacts enhance the exhibition and our understanding of the cultural and artistic identity of each community. Additionally, this exhibition features an impressive stained glass window by the artist Friedrich Adler, c. 1919 Germany, as well as historical and contemporary Judaica, prayer books and various manuscripts from various periods.

In addition to the models and displays, the Synagogue Hall is rich in media. A large screen in the center of the gallery focuses on the three daily prayers — “Shaharit, Mincha, Ma’ariv” (morning, afternoon, evening); video artwork by the artist Ran Slavin is displayed in a mirror-encircled space showcasing 24 additional synagogues from around the world; four animated films in period settings illuminate distinctive gatherings in synagogues; and a humoristic film starring Israeli journalists Jacky Levy and Kobi Arieli describes the similarities and differences between Sephardic and Ashkenazi prayer.

Visitors are invited to participate in four interactive stations: Personal Prayer (from our database the visitor selects a prayer he empathizes with, and in return is invited to share a story or prayer of his own); Jewish Music in Synagogues (nine “piyutim” (hymns) are performed by renowned artists that allow the audience to travel to the locations where these piyutim were, and still are, sung); Synagogue Architecture (24 buildings representing architectural achievements in the history of the synagogue); and Interactivity for Children (children are invited to design and build their own synagogues).

 

This gallery celebrates creativity and renaissance in Jewish life and culture through the multifaceted lens of the synagogue.

 

 

Forever Young – Bob Dylan at 75

This special exhibition celebrates cultural and creative wealth, personified by the work of Bob Dylan, who, more than any other Jewish musician, has influenced 20th century culture. The enigmatic Bob Dylan is represented through films, images, posters, displays and a vast collection of his original music. His story is relayed through the revolution he generated, his influence on music and his connection to Judaism.

Via this exhibition original footage by Elliott Landy, the official photographer of Woodstock, will be seen for the first time in Israel. A twelve-minute documentary, “My Dylan” — produced especially for the exhibition — presents Dylan’s influence on Israeli music.

Acclaimed Israeli music editor Yoav Kutner, is the Artistic Director of the exhibition and the narrator of the exhibit’s audio guide.

“Forever Young” celebrates Judaism’s capacity for creativity, cultural dialogue and renewal through the unique and pervasive contributions of Bob Dylan.

 

Operation Moses: 30 Years After

This special media exhibition gives voice to those who personally experienced the immigration to Israel from Ethiopia. For the first time ever, this story will be told by those who lived it. Their voices will be heard, free from the influence of the society that received them.

The films’ director, Orly Malessa, was a child when she immigrated to Israel as part of Operation Moses. For this film she selected — from Beit Hatfutsot’s historic collection — stills taken by Doron Bacher in 1984 in Ethiopia. The incognito photos were then uploaded to a designated Facebook calling upon users to recognize themselves and their families. Through “comments”, “likes” and “tagging”, Orly was able to choose immigrants from all over Israel to represent the Ethiopian immigrant community and share its story, featuring each in a five-minute documentary film.  Together they render in first person the immigrants’ absorption into Israeli society, considering the ups and downs of a long, difficult and complex process.

Through the stories of individuals who made their way to and within a new country, this exhibition celebrates the ways in which individual voices come together to convey the great story of the Jewish people.

 

Heroes: Trailblazers of the Jewish People – A Permanent Exhibition for Children

Bravery is one of humanity’s most mysterious and complex attributes. It is often linked to overcoming fear or apprehension in times of war or in the face of adversity. Admired, the hero becomes a role model, and is often the central figure in stories, songs and epics, instilling in future generations a hero’s values.

 

The Jewish people understand that heroes come in many forms. This complexity is the foundation of this exhibition, which offers children a wide variety of heroes to whom they can relate.

 

This exhibition is comprised of eight categories of Jewish heroes throughout history: scientists, philosophers, revolutionaries, cultural giants, athletes, courageous individuals and economic leaders.

 

In this way children — and their parents — are encouraged to redefine those qualities that make a hero. They are alerted to various aspects of success, including conquering temptation, daring to think outside the box and going against the grain.  

 

This exhibition reflects Beit Hatfutsot’s commitment to emphasizing diversity in Judaism. It celebrates Jewish culture both throughout history and in the present day, laying the foundation for pluralistic expression of who and what is exceptional in the Jewish sphere.

 

Heroes: Trailblazers of the Jewish People is designed for children ages six-through-twelve and their parents. The gallery, designed as an open space that facilitates free movement, has fifteen interactive stations and six animated movies. Textual information appears alongside each hero in the exhibit, enabling parents to provide additional material to their children. The center of the open space is illuminated and ringed with both seating and iPads containing information about the 143 heroes represented in the exhibition.

 

 

Photo Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

A DIALOGUE ABOUT ART AND COOKING

Linda Dangoor    Gil Hovav

A Portrayal of the Jewish Iraqi Kitchen-then and now

Accompanied  by the

Musician Yair Dalal andMuseum Curator Idit Sharoni

 

Date: Monday, 30 May 2016

Reception:  20:00 Event: 20:30

At: The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center, 83 Ben Porat Avenue, Or Yehuda

Cost: 60 NIS

For tickets call: 03 5339278 Ext 8

Places are limited, please book in advance.

Book purchase available at the BJHC.

 

Linda Dangoor – Artist, potter and Author

Linda has lived in the UK since the 60s. her interests in food and her Iraqi heritage have culminated in a beautifully designed cookery book: Flavours of Babylon

 

Gil Hovav – leading culinary journalists and television personality

Gil has played a major role in changing Israeli cuisine from one of basic traditional foods to one of enviable gourmet dining. He was involved in creating, producing and presenting some of Israel's most viewed and loved television food shows.

 

Yair Dalal  - a composer, violinist, oud player and singer

Yair is an Israeli musician of Iraqi-Jewish descent. He plays an important role in shaping the global world music scene.His main instruments are the oud and the violin.

 

Idit sharoni – Museum curator

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

Lag BaOmer Message - MWU Dept of Education - 2016

 

Lag BaOmer Message   Bar Kochba and Ben-Gurion: FROM INSPIRATION TO ACTION

 

Dear Friends,

 

Military victories led by Shimon Bar Kochba gave the People of Israel nearly 3 years of national independence during 132-135 CE (Common Era); we celebrate that Great Hebrew Revolt on Lag BaOmer (May 26 this year), but it also led to the worst massacres of Jews in ancient times, and the Exile of most of our People from almost all of our ancestral Land of Israel. Bar Kochba's war began in the hills of Judea and carried so far afield as Beit She'an in Lower Galilee. It cost Rome and its Empire the utter destruction of 2 complete Legions of the 12 eventually sent to crush the rebellious Jews, a lavish expedition of huge numbers of troops led by Julius Severus, the best Roman general of the time, summoned from faraway Britannia.

 

That brief flicker of freedom won from Rome inspired the Fathers of the Jewish Nation in modern times. The Father of the Third Jewish Commonwealth, Israel's first Prime Minister David Ben Gurion, adopted his Hebrew family name from one of Bar Kochba's generals. The tenacity, decisive action, and total commitment to achieving independence from the oppressive yoke of Rome inspired the just struggle of Zionist leaders to restore Jewish national life in our old-new Land of Zion and Jerusalem. They focused on the spirit ofBar Kochba's struggle rather than its tragic results; in 1947-49 it was the only way to fight the battle the whole world saw as hopeless, the War and that led to Israel's 68th Independence Day we celebrated on May 12. Ben Gurion's refusal to accept the logic of military realities gave the Jewish People its best and most profound achievement in 1800 years since Bar Kochba: national redemption in the State of Israel. That's probably what Ben Gurion meant when he famously said: "Anyone who does not believe in miracles is not a realist." Without that inspiration, without that faith in the Destiny of our People, we would today not have had our State.

 

 

 

 

 

May the light of our glorious Lag BaOmer bonfires illuminate our present and the bright promise of our future; may we kindle and sustain the spirit of our long national continuity in this festival!

 

Lag BaOmer Sameach!
Chazak ve'Ematz!

 

RABBI CARLOS A. TAPIERO
Deputy Director-General & Director of Education
Maccabi World Union

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

« Live Well » Event 2016

 

After the fantastic success of the International Women day on March, the Show Team Events ‘team is proud to invite you to the event « Live Well » 2016

On Sunday 19 June 2016, for the very first time the Show Team Events bring in Israel more than 120 Israelis and French exhibitors on2000 m2 at the Namal Tel Aviv, Hangar 11. Showcasing the most scientifically proven, bespoke, health and wellness products on the market to date, the most innovative designer, the newest beauty care products…

 

“Live Well” keys numbers

  • 20 french press cover

  • 45  satisfied exhibitors during the International women day on March

  • 100 social media French groups (Facebook/twitter/Instagram)

  • + 120 exhibitors

  • + 400 visitors presents during the International women day on March

  • + 1000 visitors expected

  • 2000 m2 in the most prestigious venue at the Namal Tel Aviv

Leading topics

Wellness topics is appreciated and research by the French Customers in Israel

  • Body and spirits harmonisation

  • Keep in shave

  • Stress’s release

  • Discover the new beauty care

  • Create a career in the wellness industry

120 wellness’s professionals’ exhibitors around 5 topics:

  • General wellness

  • living healthier and prevention

  • Be Well in your head

  • Be Well in your body

June 19 Sunday, 2016

Hangar 11 – Namal Tel Aviv

Opening hours 09.30h to 22.00

Entrance fee: 30 Nis

VIP Cocktail 19.30 to 22.00

Easy access: Bus, Shirout, Train, car (Parking close by)

 Information contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Nina Naggar: 0547006012    

                                     

Véronique Dahan : 0504845565  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President Rivlin marks 60 years of Tel Aviv University, hosts Board of Governors members from around the world

 

 

President Reuven Rivlin hosted this morning (Sunday), more than 240 representatives of Tel Aviv University, including members of the institution's Board of Governors from around the world, to mark 60 years of the university.

 

President Rivlin welcomed all the delegates, and congratulated them on the University's 60th anniversary. He stressed, "Education is not just about learning and teaching - it is a way of life that drives the whole country forward. It is the beating heart of the modern state." The President continued,  "Our universities are a key part of the debate in this is country. They are a place where we hear support and criticism of Israeli politics. They are proof that criticism of politics or of different policies, is as much part of Zionism as support for Israel. So to the people who want to boycott Israeli students, professors, and universities, we say very clearly: We will not allow hatred to silence the debate. An academic boycott is a major threat not just to Israel, but to the entire scientific world, and we must fight it and stop it."

 

Also addressing the event were Chairman of the Board of Governors Professor Jacob Frenkel, representative of the Board of Governors from Italy, Mrs. Selina Goren Komeran, and President of Tel Aviv University Professor Joseph Klafter.

 

Photo: Mark Neiman (GPO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sign from Iran” is an exhibition of contemporary Iranian placards opening at the L.A.Mayer Museum of Islamic Art, Jerusalem on May 19th 2016.  At a press conference on May 17th, museum director Mr. Nadim Shiban spoke about the museum’s recent activity, introducing political poster artist, teacher and designer Yossi Lemel whose inspiration it was to have the exhibit. Curators of the exhibition are Professor Lemel and Dr. Marta Sylvestrovà of the Moravian Gallery, Brno, Czechoslovakia.

 

35 years ago, Yossi Lemel travelled to Turkey, reaching the Turkish-Iran border; he dreamt of entering Iran but was unable to do so for obvious reasons. He spoke of the process of putting the current exhibit together as a difficult one, fraught with complications. The placards, collected in Czechoslovakia, Slovenia and Germany, represent a synthesis of east and west, of topography and calligraphy and shed light on the culture and people of Iran – of art, theatre, society and political issues. Due to sensitive aspects of the show, there were some artists who decided to withdraw their works from the exhibition in Jerusalem, which was put together especially for the Museum of Islamic Art, Jerusalem.  Lemel emphasized its importance both for us and for the artists, for the visitor to see the human content in a world that addresses Iran from a political point of view; he also pointed out the disparity of what is actually shown and what remains concealed in art on a country whose society is as conservative as Iran. Yet despite prohibitions and restrictions imposed by the regime, the country’s artists have certainly made their mark and have proved themselves innovative in the world of calligraphy and typography.

 

 

 

 

Entering the gallery, one is confronted by a huge, vivid photo of young Iranian people, mostly women, in a clandestine café. The women’s faces are not covered and one is smoking a cigarette. The picture was taken by French photographer Jeremy Suyker, who has been traveling to Iran since 2013, documenting the country’s rich culture and history as well as Tehran’s underground art scene. As to the 60 posters of 27 artists, on different levels they connect to Iran’s cultural, historic and religious traditions, the poets and philosophers of the last 1000 years of Persian history and the relationship between Arabic and Persian script, and through the eyes of the sophisticated modern artist. Addressing political and social issues, artists have used visual puns, metaphors and indirect poetic messages to convey their message. The viewer is challenged to read into the symbols on these placards. Women artists, combining their rich cultural heritage and multidisciplinary techniques, give expression to women’s issues. An exhibition of great beauty and interest, the viewer experiences the sensuality and mystery of ancient times through the eyes of masterful contemporary artists.

 

“Sign from Iran” - May 19th - November 19th.

 

The L.A.Mayer Museum of Islamic Art, 2 Hapalmach St., Jerusalem

  

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There’s a big wide world out there.

 

Mention most countries or areas to anyone and usually an image or concept pops into their consciousness right away; snow in Switzerland, sand in the Sahara, sunshine in Sydney. Israel conjures up many thoughts, but the most frequent one is probably “Judaism” and the Jewish homeland. Although sophisticated people do know that the Holy Land is the center of the world for all three monotheistic religions, how many people know just how much there is to see in Israel concerning the birthplace and stamping grounds of Christ?

 

The Pontifical Institute of Notre Dame in Jerusalem is a good place to begin your road to discovery. Jerusalem is no stranger to controversy; Notre Dame aspires to be the route to serenity, peaceful coexistence and normalcy.

 

Its history is long and checkered and not within the scope of this article. Today the old but beautifully restored building houses not only the guest house (they prefer not to call it a hotel), but also three restaurants, a gift shop, conference rooms and a giant auditorium. Not to mention of course – of course! – the tranquil chapel. This is after all a Catholic institution, property of the Vatican. There is free Wi-Fi in the lobby area, but no tennis court, swimming pool or gym. Only the suites have TVs. This no ordinary hotel.

 

 

 

And then there is the “Shroud of Turin” museum. (Yes, Turin Italy.) The history of the shroud (said to be the mantle that covered the body of Jesus for burial), how and why it reached Turin, and why it is believed to be the real thing, awaits you at Notre Dame. The mystery, the theory, the multidisciplinary research and scientific examinations, the religious beliefs, the perplexing photographic evidence – all come together in this mind-boggling museum.

 

The Institute also runs a school to train young people for a career in the hospitality and tourism industry. The school celebrated its silver jubilee in 2015 and there are currently about 140 students.

 

Confused? Don’t be. Although Notre Dame might be considered as “only” a guest house for pilgrims, it is really a fine hotel, and far from Spartan. A welcoming lobby and reception desk, comfortable rooms, a generous and varied breakfast, fine dining at the rooftop restaurant and the other cafes and dining areas. The Jerusalem location is right opposite the New Gate into the old city. (The gate was opened when Notre Dame was built, for convenient pilgrim access to the old city’s many Christian sites.) The concept of Notre Dame is of “a gift for humanity” that embodies Jerusalem: moderation, co-existence, downed barriers, and peace. Not to mention the typical Jerusalem architecture of a bygone age. The “Mosaic Suite” must surely be unique in the entire world. If you are fortunate enough to stay there, or even to visit it briefly….

 

The Christian community in Israel serves as a buffer between militant Muslims and militant Jews and the religious diversity, so apparent at Notre Dame, tends to enhance its power for dialog between antagonists. But more than that, the Pontifical Institute Notre Dame also serves not only as a buffer, but as a link, between Judaism and Christianity.

 

 

 

Nowhere is that clearer than at “Magdala”, a site on the Sea of Galilee which is currently being completed, and which is closely linked to the Notre Dame Center and the Catholic Church. Magdala is right by the town where Mary Magdalene lived 2000 years ago. Soon after excavations began, the ruins of the oldest 1st century synagogue were discovered. Nearby, the ruins of the “mikveh” (Jewish bathhouse for ritual cleansing and purification) were excavated. Is this the synagogue where Christ prayed, studied and preached? All signs indicate it was. On the lake shore just 100 meters away is the port where fishermen brought their catches 20 centuries ago, where Jesus performed miracles, where the community market place was located. Over the old restored market place floor now stands “Duc in Altum” – the main so-called “boat chapel” and the four smaller side chapels (for quiet reflection and prayer). The building is breathtakingly beautiful in its elegant simplicity.

 

Magdala, with its synagogue and chapel, set in secular Israel, is symbolic of the bridging aimed at by the Vatican Church leadership in Israel, of bringing the vision to life. Magdala’s core mission and purpose is to offer a 1st century experience in a 21st century environment and to highlight its historical, cultural and spiritual significance. “To really bring the vision to life.” It is staffed (and visited) by people from all walks of life, all religions, races, sects and nationalities. The message is reconciliation, compromise, peace, tranquility and harmony. The Catholic Church sees itself as the “mother of humanity” and as such has a role to play in bringing her sometimes unruly children together.

 

 

 

The issues of womanhood are spotlighted in “Duc in Altum”, where the main atrium is space devoted to women of biblical times. How appropriate that is in 2016, at the town where Mary Magdalene lived. Religion, history and culture come together in this continuity of Judaism and Christianity at the crossroads of Jewish and Christian history. In this day and age, we found the message refreshing in its simplicity. We believe you might too.

 

There is much to see, learn, experience and especially, to reflect on, both at the Notre Dame Center and at Magdala.

 

www.notredamecenter.org

www.magdala.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peres' Mini Mondial for Peace:

In a call against the recent racism and violence in football stadiums - The Ninth President Shimon Peres held the "Mini Mondial for Peace", joined by Israeli Premier League Football players, Ambassadors from around the world, Mayors from across Israel, and 300 Jewish and Arab, Israeli and Palestinian children

 

Peres blew the opening whistle and called the football players to unite against racism and violence on the pitch:

"There is no place for racism and violence on the football pitch – you, the players, serve as an example to young people of every nation"

"The fact that you came here to play today - not only with your feet, but also your soul – proves that, together, we can make a difference."

 

Yossi Benayoun:

"We are happy for this opportunity- we came here to do our part through the game to lead by example on the field and beyond."

 

Against the backdrop of racism and violence in football stadiums around the world, The Ninth President Shimon Peres began the day (9.5) with the Peres Center for Peace's "Mini Mondial for Peace" in Herzliya. The event opened with two unique exhibition games, the first featuring Ambassadors from around the world and Mayors from across Israel playing against a team of young Arab and Jewish, Israeli and Palestinian participants from the "Twinned Peace Sports Schools" program. This was followed by a second exhibition match featuring Israeli Premier League all-star football players who played together with the Israeli and Palestinian young footballers. The Peres Center's "Twinned Peace Sports Schools" program promotes co-existence between youths throughout Israel and the West Bank. Ambassadors, Mayors, professional footballers, and the young participants came together to promote a message of peace and against the recent violence and racism that has taken place in football stadiums around the world.

 

At a briefing in the locker room with the professional all-star players prior to the start of the event Peres said: "I am so happy that you have joined us in playing for peace. We must end the recent negativity occurring on the pitch. You come here today to not only play with your feet, but also with your soul." Peres took to the pitch and said: "Thank you for coming here to make a statement against racism and violence. Your presence here along with Israeli and Palestinian children sends a clear message against racism and violence and for the promotion of peace through sports. We must draw a clear line on the field and in life. Violence and racism on the football pitch affects our children- so you must lead by example. I am proud that, every week, Israelis and Palestinians come together to play football and prove that it is possible.

 

At the "Mini Mondial" opening ceremony, the Peres Center held a moving tribute to the legendary football player Johan Cruyff, who passed away this year. Cruyff was a staunch proponent of education for coexistence and tolerance through football in Israel for many years and was a strong supporter of the Peres Center's Twinned Peace Sports Schools project. Peres and several of the young participants - Arab and Jewish - presented his son, Jordi Cruyff, with an honorary jersey with number 14 on the back, which was his father's number, and the professional all-star players wore orange jerseys in his memory.

 

The "Ambassador Peace Team" players included: Ambassadors from Albania and Austria, and senior diplomats from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United States, Italy, France, and Australia. They were joined by Mayors and Heads of regional councils including: the Msayors of Acre, Herzliya, and Kfar Saba, and the heads of Yoav Regional Council, Sha'ar Hanegev, Abu Ghosh, Hof HaSharon, and Shibli.

 

The Israeli Premier Football League players included: Yossi Benayoun, Ahmed Abed, Avihai Yadin, Gal, Dan Aybinder, Yuval Spungin, Guy Haimov, Pedro Joaquín Galván, Hisham Kiwan, Dai Saba, Haiim Margishvili, Omar Padida, Stav Pinish, Zion Tsemach, Ahmed Kasumi, Naor Peser, Dor Alov, Shai Constantine, Ohad Cohen, Omar Padida.

 

Herzliya Mayor Moshe Fadlon said: "There is nothing like sport and football to connect people and religions and to transcend differences of opinion. This is the third year we have hosted the "Mini Mondial for Peace", the Peres Center for Peace, and President Peres, and we are proud of your vision."

 

Ofer Eini, Chair of the Israeli Football Association said: "If we, the adults, can act like these young football players, together we can conquer racism and violence, and we will have a better future for ourselves and with our neighbors".

 

The "Mini Mondial for Peace" is the annual peak event of the Peres Center for Peace's "Twinned Peace Sports Schools" program in which Jewish and Arab, Israeli and Palestinian children meet on the football field. Throughout this project the children meet one another, train together, learn each other's language, and play football together on mixed teams. This project, which has been running for 14 years, brings together hundreds of children from different communities all over the country every year. To date, over 20,000 children have participated in this project.

 

Photos : Efrat Saar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATE. Exhibition of the artists Dorina Horătău and Claudia Mușat at The Artists' House, Tel Aviv. 7 - 21 May 2016

 
 
 

The Romanian Cultural Institute has the honor to invite you at the exhibition STATE, open between the 7th and the 21st of May, 2016, at Tel Aviv Artists' House. On display there will be fiber artworks by  Dorina Horărău and Claudia Mușat, two of the best Romanian fiber artists today.

The exhibition highlights a series work stages, as well as studies of the textile materials in various phases of processing. The artworks of Claudia Mușat reveal the artists' researches on silk and the tri-dimensional works of Dorina Horătău express meaningful moments of her private life.

The opening will take place on Saturday, the 7th of May, at 12:00 hrs., in the presence of the artist Dorina Horătău.

The exhibition will be open for public at Tel Aviv Artists' House, 9 Alharizi st. on the following schedule: Monday to Thursday between 10:00-13:00 and 17:00-19:00, Friday between 10:00-13:00 and Saturday between 11:00-14:00. More information: http://artisthouse.co.il/.

Partners: Tel Aviv Artists' House, The Romanian Artists' Union, The National Art University in Bucharest.

 

 

 

 

 

''Expressions – Impressions'' Nurit Rosen Solo Art Exhibition

 

Curator: Irit Levin  May 6 – 26, 2016

 

Beit Sokolov (Journalists House) 4 Kaplan St. Tel Aviv

 

Opening: Friday, May 6, at 12:30 pm

 

This is Nurit Rosen's first solo art exhibition after participating in several group exhibitions, including one in London. "The exhibition sums up a year of creative activity by the artist. Rosen's three bodies of work presented in this exhibition, side by side, move from a state of intense color to serenity and calmness. The spectator is engulfed in a maze of shapes, which are part realistic and part imaginative'' said Irit Levin, the exhibition's curator.

 

Nurit Rosen begins a work sometimes with a line and sometimes with a spot. She works spontaneously, intuitively, and without any plan, on small cardboards, using oil pastels. Her black acrylic lines form a dialogue with a strong range of colors.

 

''These new works – comments Rosen – are different from the strict figurative drawings I used to paint. They are the result of my dealing with ovarian cancersince 2014. The works reflect my state of mind, the feeling that there is no way out, of meaningless, of frustration, chaos, and uncertainty. I work without thinking, using my emotions, and each time the result takes me by surprise. However, when I look at the entire body of works, I see a celebration of optimism.  Apparently, my wish to survive is stronger than the pain and skepticism that I will overcome cancer.''

 

Two very talented musicians –Taly Rubinstein on the recorder and Tal Even-Zur on the piano - the famous duo Tal Y Taly, will perform at the exhibition's opening, playing original music and their adaptations of Israeli songs. These world-renowned musicians have recently contributed to an album that won a Latin Grammy award.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spring festival in the Ein-Yael "Hands-on" Museum in Jerusalem- taking visitors 2,000 years back in time

Meeting ancient artisans in the colorful Roman street ; treasure hunt for the whole family in the garden of Song of Songs; the wonderful children's play "Magical moments by the spring" ; making musical instruments from natural materials ; live music in the beautiful outdoors of Ein-Yael ; weaving wicker baskets; spinning wool in the spindle and a variety of other fun activities for the whole family 

 

The Ein Yael "Hands-on" Museum is holding a spring festival in Hol Hamoed of Passover (24 -28 of April) this year! Among the activities: artisans recreating ancient handicrafts in the magical Roman street ; a treasure hunt for the whole family in the Song of Songs garden; live music which will be played around the site and a variety of other fun activities for the whole family.

In addition, visitors will be invited to experience all of Ein Yael's wonderful workshops: weaving baskets and making musical instruments of natural materials, painting wet plaster in the fresco workshop, learning about ancient building methods in the mud workshop, making clay in the ceramic workshop, planning and cutting a personal mosaic and lots more.

 

The dates of the festival are: 24-27th of April, from 10:00 to 17:00.

 

And on the 28th   of April from 10:00 to14:00

 

The Ein-Yael museum provides a special and enriching fun-filled activity for the entire family, combining arts and crafts with learning about the ancient way of life. In the museum you will find orchards, a recreated Roman street, petting corner, a live spring, ancient agricultural facilities and olive trees, vineyards and more.

Entrance cost: 45 NIS for child, 35 NIS for adult.

 

The Ein-Yael "Hands-on" Museum, Jerusalem (next to "Malcha" train station)

 

www.einyael.co.il

Telephone: 02-6451866

Free parking.

 

Courtesy: Ein Yael Museum.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IdL6FZvuIU

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IdL6FZvuIU

 

 


HUNGARIAN DAYS II Festival.

in Tel Aviv-Yafo

Hatachana Complex
קויפמןפינת HaMered St, Tel Aviv-YafoFriday – Saturday, 6-7 May, 2016
from 11.00 am 


Andor Nagy

Ambassador of Hungary
and
Ms. Mariann Bercsényi

Cordially invite you to the

 

HUNGARIAN DAYS II

in Tel Aviv-Yafo
Hatachana Complex
קויפמן פינת HaMered St, Tel Aviv-Yafo

Friday – Saturday, 6-7 May, 2016
from 11.00 am

The Festival will be opened by
Mr. Ron Huldai, Mayor of Tel Aviv and H.E. Ambassador Andor Nagy

Come and Enjoy!

The Debrecen Hajdu Folk Ensemble, Hungarian Food,
Rubik’s Cube Training, Simultaneous Chess Games with Sofia Polgár, Woman Chess Grandmaster,
and many more!

Admission is Free. Everybody is Welcome!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
From Barbra Streisand to Broadway  Linda Tomer Show  14th May at Cafe Yafo
 

Linda Tomer, Singer and Performer will sweep you away with the greatest hits of Barbra Streisand and well known musicals of our time.

Enjoy listening to songs such as; The way we were, Hello Dolly, Papa can you hear me, Woman in love, Memory and more …..and from musicals ; My Fair Lady, Sound of Music,

Les Miserables, Chicago, West Side Story, Evita, Funny girl …… 

Ronny Zur - piano

 

 

CAFE YAFO – Reservations; 03-5181988

Oley Zion Street no. 11 – The flea market – Jaffa – 14th May.

 

LINDA TOMER website  www.lindatomer.com 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

First Time - Pre-Eurovision Promo Event  in Israel

 

Sponsored by the Israeli Ministry of Tourism, the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Municipality of Tel-Aviv, and Ir Olam Organization.  Produced by Tali Eshkoli.

Twenty leading artists from all over Europe who will be representing their countries in the upcoming Eurovision Song Contest in Stockholm, came to Israel for a three-day visit [from 11th to 14th April], to perform in a unique event with their entries for this year’s Eurovision Song Contest. Israel Calling 2016 was the first Pre-Eurovision Event in Israel intended not only to promote the Eurovision Song Contest, but also the City of Tel-Aviv and Israel throughout Europe.  Together with the artists participating in the Eurovision Song Contest, there were journalists who came from all around the world.

 

 

They made a tour around the city of Tel-Aviv and Ancient Jaffa, also having the time to plant trees with KKL-JNF in KKL-JNF’s Tzora forest. There was a good and friendly atmosphere with lots of singing and much happiness. They ate in excellent restaurants, took photos, and reported their adventures back to their worldwide fans via the social media.  

 

 

A press conference took place on April 12th at midday.

A festive and welcoming gala event took place on April 11th, with the attendance of all the artists and delegations, Kids.IL (The Israeli representatives at Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2012) , Moran Mazor – The Israeli representative at Eurovision 2013 as well as local and international media, Ambassadors and Diplomatic Staff of the participating countries, and former Eurovision representative of  Israel.

 

 

 The highlight – the live show on Tuesday 12th April at the Moadon Hateatron [Theater Club] that in addition to the 20 Eurovision artists attending, there were also representatives of Israel’s former Eurovision Competitions present, including, among others, Yizhar Cohen [first Israeli Eurovision Winner in 1985], Avi Toledano [who came second in 1982 and 1983], and Tzvika Pick, [composer of the winning song ‘Diva’ sung by Dana International in 1998], Hanna Dresner - Tzakh better Know by her Stage name Ilanit .

 

 

 

This is the biggest Eurovision event to take place in Israel since the  country hosted the Eurovision Song Contest in 1999. Such promo events having been taking place for many years already in The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Russia, and this is the first time that a promo event has gone out of continental Europe to take place in Israel.

 

Artists perfoming;

Albania – Eneda Tarifa

Austria – Zoe

Azerbaijan – Samra

Belarus – Ivan

Bulgaria – Poli Genova

Estonia – Juri Pootsmann

Finland – Sandhja

France – Amir

Hungary – Freddie

Israel – Hovi Star

Lithuania – Donny Montell

Moldova – Lidia Isac

Norway – Agnete

Poland – Michal Szpak

Romania - Ovidiu Anton

Russia - Sergey Lazarev

Servia - Sanja Vučić ZAA

Slovenia - ManuElla

Switzerland -Rykka United Kingdom - Joe and Jake

 

 The event’s official social media channels:

FACEBOOKHTTPS://WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/ISRAELCALLING
INSTAGRAMHTTPS://WWW.INSTAGRAM.COM/ISRAELCALLING
TWITTERHTTPS://TWITTER.COM/ISRAELCALLING

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

The Israel Festival is marking 55 years of its existence.

 

At a press conference at the Eden-Tamir Music Center, Ein Kerem Jerusalem on April 11th 2016, chairman of the Israel Festival board of directors Dan Halperin opened the meeting, stating the aim of the 2016 Israel Festival, to take place from May 24th to June 11th, as addressing the many different kinds of people in Israel, offering them a range of events they will not experience anywhere else and at reasonable prices.

 

Young, go-ahead Jerusalem city councilman Ofer Berkovich, co-founder and chairman of the Wake Up Jerusalem movement, mentioned that Eyal Sher (CEO of the Israel Festival as of 2015) and artistic director Itzik Juli (also as of 2015) have been challenging in their choice of events.

Jerusalem-born Berkovich, referring to the city as a problematic city at times, claims that its artistic life is a normalising factor; he hopes to see the festival attracting Jews, Arabs and tourists to its many events.

Another aim is to give young local artists a stage. This year’s festival will host more than 100 artists from all over the world and will take place in several venues around Jerusalem. Eyal Sher spoke of the Israel Festival’s many goals – the economy, tourism, serving education and the community – but also to be different, witty and even to tease!

 

 

 

 

One question in which the Israel Festival team has engaged is how to be appealing to the public, yet still maintaining standards of quality and unity. Sher said it was no secret that the Israel Festival is being revised via a different reality. Next to speak was Itzik Juli. For him the “now” being represented at the festival includes consideration of art past and future. He referred to the program as a kind of search, with the opening event homage to one of Israel’s greatest singers Shoshana Damari (1923-2006) with the closing event being Belgian inter-disciplinary artist Jan Fabre’s 24-hour-long contemporary multidisciplinary theatre piece “Mount Olympus”.

 

Mostly modern and multidisciplinary in approach, this year’s Israel Festival will offer theatre and dance events from Israel, Europe and China, Israeli music and some classical music, (no jazz and no chamber music), music in which east meets west and two musical events of Holocaust content. And there will be outdoor events around Jerusalem and shows to interest the whole family…some at modest prices, others free of charge. Daring, ambitious and thought-provoking, there will be much festival fare to challenge and stimulate open-minded audiences at the 2016 Israel Festival!

 

http://www.israel-festival.org.il

 

http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.com

http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.com

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
An auspicious event of the first Bach in Jerusalem Festival (March 17th-21st 2016) was a recital titled “Preludes and Fugues performed by pianist Jascha Nemtsov. It took place at the Jerusalem Music Centre, Mishkenot Sha’ananim on March 20th.
With his program taking a cue from the music of J.S.Bach at the core of the festival, Professor Nemtsov opened his recital with pieces from Book I of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier - a contemplative, gently expansive reading of the Prelude in E major, followed by its bold partner fugue. His poetic rendering of the F-minor Prelude highlighted key notes; then, to the Fugue with its enigmatic, atonal subject, clearly highly inspirational to Nemtsov, whose poly-dimensional playing was variously and imaginatively orchestrated at each stage of the piece.

Many of us were especially drawn to the recital to hear the pianist’s first Israeli performance of a number of the 24 Preludes and Fugues of Ukraine-born composer Vsevolod Zaderatsky (1891-1953), an artist systematically persecuted, excluded from Soviet musical life, exiled and twice imprisoned. Much of his music was destroyed. He did, however, compose six piano sonatas, three programmatic piano cycles, two operas, symphony- and ensemble scores and the cycle of 24 Preludes and Fugues. The Preludes and Fugues (1937-1938) constitute the central work of the composer’s musical legacy (there are also some literary works), having miraculously survived and made it into the hands of the composer’s son who, in the 1970s deciphered what was written in the Kilyma camp of Siberia mostly on telegram forms, copying the pieces out in full. The cycle of Zaderatsky’s Preludes and Fugues was first performed in its entirety by Nemtsov in 2015 at the 6th International Shostakovich Days (Gohrisch, Germany). 2015 also saw the publishing of the work as well as Nemtsov’s double CD recording of the complete set for the Profil label. At the Jerusalem recital, Jascha Nemtsov’s performance of this highly varied group of pieces convincingly displayed Zaderatsky’s kaleidoscope of ideas and his fine (and highly challenging) pianistic writing; beyond those qualities, Nemtsov sketched a picture of the man himself and the breadth of fantasy and emotion that may well have been what saw him through ordeals in the gulag that many do not survive. The pieces also attest to the composer’s mastery at the piano. If Bach’s C-major Prelude of the WTC I is bathed in light and tranquillity, Zaderatsky’s C-major is ghostly, intense, confrontational, sometimes atonal. The splendid A-minor Prelude, with its hectic, bright and cascading agenda, as well as its drone presence, breathes optimism, as does its richly chordal accompanying Fugue, which ends on an octave-and-fifth, pared-down Renaissance-type chord. In the G-major Prelude, with its agile, weightless “Flight-of-the-Bumblebee” texture, Nemtsov’s virtuosic performance displayed the piece’s play of colours and humour. The G-Major Fugue, however, follows by conjuring up a complex soundscape. After the atonal, floating “seascape” of the E-Minor Prelude, the E-minor Fugue, with quotes threaded through the texture, its voices shaped with individual expression, ended on three decisive minor chords. A true gem, the B-Minor Prelude’s fine gossamer melody wrought of parallel seconds took one’s breath away with its beauty; its modal/atonal partner fugue taking on a much weightier character, its texture offering a suggestion of bells. With the F-sharp minor Prelude’s shining, high melodic line and poignant bell-like textures, we were raised up to a more celestial place; its Fugue splendidly chiselled, with each phrase growing out of its predecessor. Nemtsov’s total immersion in the music and in the workings of Zaderatsky’s intellect and soul left the audience humbled and moved.
 

First silenced as a “degenerate” composer due to his Jewish ancestry, Czech composer Viktor Ullmann composed the “Variations and Fugue on a Hebrew Folk Song”, the fifth and last movement of Sonata No.7, his final work, when interned in Theresienstadt. Against all odds, Ullmann was very creative there. “Theresienstadt was and is for me a school of structure”, he wrote. “I must stress that I have bloomed in my musical work…without inhibition…” In 1944, however, shortly after completing the piece, he was transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau, soon perishing in the gas chambers there. The Hebrew folksong on which the movement is based is a Zionist song sung by Yehuda Sharett. It sets a poem by the poet Rachel. Ullmann’s variations bear resemblance to a Slovak national anthem (banned by the Nazis) and a Hussite hymn, also quoting the Protestant hymn “Now thank we all our God”. Apparent in this final movement are, in fact, a comprehensive array of the elements making up Ullmann’s musical-, emotional- and intellectual existence (references to Bach, to Christianity versus Judaism, folk music, the fugue, tonal- versus atonal music) or might it be an utterance of defiance of his Nazi captors? Nemtsov’s free, playful and brilliant performance of the work reflected the composer’s unshakable optimism. In his introductory words, the artist referred to Ullmann’s Fugue as a “kind of vision”. With BACH motif appearing in the fugue, here was another connection to the festival itself.

When Dmitri Shostakovich went to Leipzig in 1950 for events marking 200 years of J.S.Bach’s death, he heard young virtuoso pianist Tatiana Nikolyeva performing pieces from both books of The Well-Tempered Clavier. Returning to Moscow, he began to sketch out his own 24 Preludes and Fugues, a work alluding to the music of Mussorgsky, Borodin and Russian folk music but also to the world of counterpoint. This diverse and imaginative collection of pieces takes the listener through the wide range of the composer’s emotional world, from bleak despair to exaltation, from the grotesque to devil-may-care jollity. It was Nikolyeva who then premiered the Shostakovich work in 1952. At his Jerusalem recital, Jascha Nemtsov played three pairs of Shostakovich’s Preludes and Fugues opus 87, opening with the C-Major pair - autumnal, harmonically rich, gently dissonanced yet breathing a sense of C-Major purity and directness, its Fugue played with fragile beauty. Nemtsov, having mentioned that the F-Sharp-Minor prelude included motifs from Klezmer music, presented the agitated, feisty miniature with playfulness, cynicism and a touch of whimsy, then drawing the listener into the disturbing banality-cum-dissonance of the Fugue subject and its complex workings, a piece as bewitching as it is disturbing. As to the D-Minor Prelude, Nemtsov highlighted its noble character, giving a natural and free voice to the richly varied emotional agenda of the consequent Fugue. Professor Nemtsov’s playing sensitively plumbs the depths of Shostakovich’s mind, his elegant and nimble touch presenting the pieces with masterful eloquence, his deep enquiry into each revealing its truth.

Pianist and musicologist Jascha Nemtsov was born in Magadan (Siberia), growing up in St. Petersburg and graduating with distinction from the St. Petersburg Conservatory. Since 1992, he has lived in Germany, with a busy international career performing both solo- and chamber music. Nemtsov’s repertoire covers a wide range of works and styles, from Classical- and Romantic repertoire to music of the 20th- and 21st centuries, with emphasis on Russian music – Shostakovich, Zaderatsky, Weinberg and other composers. As a performer and musicologist, he has focused on Jewish art music of the early 20th century and performs works of composers who suffered at the hands of the Nazis. He has been active in salvaging forgotten works of the New Jewish School (Russia, early 20th century). Jascha Nemtsov’s many recordings have won him several prizes. He today holds the chair of History of Jewish Music at the University of Music Franz Liszt Weimar and serves as academic director of the Abraham Geiger College (the Reform rabbinic/cantorial seminary attached to the University of Potsdam, Berlin.)
 
 
Photo Pianist and musicologist Jascha Nemtsov performs at the first Bach in Jerusalem Festival
 photo credit for Nrmysov pjoto
 

 

 

 

" My Class " A Personal Documentary movie with a message

 

"Not on every day of his life does a man stand and get the honor and the privilege to share his perspective on life thru a rich movie with colors, photos, music, poetry and above all - Human beings."

With these words I started my speech (April the 6th) at the gala screening of my documentary movie "My Class" at the Cameri Theater in Tel Aviv.

In July 2015 I joined a Habima and Cameri theatre trip to the Balkans. We visited four states, Macedonia, Albania, Montenegro and Serbia. The aim of the trip was to stage the play "Our Class" which deals with the Holocaust, a play originally written in Polish and translated into Hebrew. From many standpoints, the "Our Class" trip was also my own inner journey to my class in Jerusalem, and that was the reason why I made my movie.

 

 

In the movie I show, besides the scenes from the play which I deliberately put in black and white, the breathtaking views and moving events which I witnessed during the trip and which constituted a contrast to the contents of the play.

My aim was to show that the Jewish people survived even after all the horrible events which it suffered in the course of history, especially during the Holocaust, and that all the nations in the world should build and not destroy, to make peace instead of war, and to insure that such a holocaust will never happen again.

 

Many people who took part in bringing the play "Our Class" to the Balkans participated in the gala screening, the ambassadors of Macedonia, Albania, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Angola, and the Israeli ambassador to Macedonia, Dan Oryan, and the Israeli ambassador to Malta and Moldova, David Oren, and well as business partners, actors and others. The guest of honor at the event was the deputy minister of culture of Macedonia. Certainly, all the tremendous effort which was invested in the project was worth it and definitely exciting.

 

Besides mentioning in my movie the fact that Israel and Macedonia are celebrating twenty years of diplomatic relations, I pointed out the fact that other relations are growing also with the other Balkan countries, and I felt that the gala screening was another cultural brick uniting human beings together.

 

Being a personal movie, I also said in my speech: "My movie is like a creative dish of food, and each one of you is invited to taste and judge." The fact that I received a large number of varied reactions made me feel proud that I had created something to talk about, whether some liked it or not, or some thought that I should add more materials or change some of them. I didn't pretend to make comparison between the story of the Holocaust which was brought thru the play "Our Class" to my own story with my class in Jerusalem as a pupil, but to share my associations which arose during the tour, due of the fact that in my class sometimes I also suffered discrimination and had to protect myself.

 

The movie is also not about the actors or the play, even when I'm showing them. I was like a walking shadow who documented them thru my perspective, and the reason I did that is because I really believe that we should keep telling our history to our children, even the horrible events, in order to educate them to improve our world to be a better place to live in.

Some of you who know me as a poet maybe will understand my hidden message by reading this poem which I'm read in the movie:       

 

Scythe

 

On the outskirts of Podgorica

Next to the melon shed

I saw from a distance a farmer

Raising his scythe.

When he cut with a sharp blow

I felt how my soul was split in two -

The one whose past does not let go,

And the one whose future is yet before it,

And I chose you

And I chose the future.

 

At the end of the movie I putt the song "Hands Across the Mountains" by David Ben Reuven, who translated the subtitles of the movie into English, and I thought that this song was a perfect choice because my philosophy, even if it sounds pretentious, us that if all human beings will unite and hold their hands across mountains and oceans we will create a better world.

 

 I dedicated this movie to my late father and my beloved mother, and to my children, with the hope that the message of my movie will be understood by all, and if so, that will be my gain.

 

 photo   The Israeli ambassador to Macedonia on the middle, Pierre Lavi on right and the Serbian ambassador and his wife on the left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forbes Hosts First-Ever Large-Scale Live Musical Performance Synced to Virtual Reality to Cap Off Its Under 30 Summit EMEA

 

With the goal of promoting Co-Existence, the concert featured curated acts from around the world, including London-Based Hip-Hop Star Little Simz, Okieriete Onaodowan from the Hit Broadway Musical “Hamilton,” Palestinian Rapper SAZ with an Israeli Funk Band Lucille Crew, and U.S. Rock Band MAE with Violinist Tim Fain and VR Director David Lobser

The concert, attended by more than 600 of the world’s most influential entrepreneurs and game changers, was held at one of the most historic music venues on earth, the 3,000-year-old Tower of David in Jerusalem, on Wednesday, April 6

JERUSALEM (April 7, 2016) – At the 3,000-year old Tower of David in Jerusalem, Forbes hosted yesterday the first-ever large-scale live musical performance synced to virtual reality (VR) to cap off its Under 30 Summit EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa) -- a summit that brought together more than 600 of the world’s most influential young entrepreneurs and game changers as culled from Forbes’ 30 Under 30 lists.

The concert, designed to promote Co-Existence, featured curated acts from around the world, such as London-based hip-hop star Little Simz, Okieriete Onaodowan from the Hit Broadway Musical “Hamilton,” Palestinian rapper SAZ with an Israeli funk band Lucille Crew, and U.S. rock band MAE (Multisensory Aesthetic Experience) with violinist Tim Fain and VR director David Lobser.

“This concert sits in the middle of two days of service in the cause of co-existence,” said Randall Lane, Editor of Forbes magazine. “And we’re making history in the field of virtual reality. People will look back on this night as a turning point in the history of music and performance.”

 

 

The concert was powered by Vertigo, a social platform launching this summer which connects the world of music and people in real time. All attendees of the concert wore virtual reality headsets and enjoyed a simultaneous virtual reality experience as MAE, featuring violinist Tim Fain and VR by animation director David Lobser, debuted its song “LIGHT,” its first single in five years. The song and VR experience are available online here for free: www.maevr.vertigomusic.com.

“MAE is honored to collaborate with violinist Tim Fain, VR animator David Lobser and Vertigo Music, to create a first-of-its-kind live synced VR concert experience inside the historic Tower of David as part of the Forbes Under 30 Summit EMEA,” said Jacob Marshall Co- Founder and drummer of U.S. rock band MAE, and Advisor to Vertigo. “We humbly believe that co-existence, reconciliation, and transcendence are messages best initially delivered in the language of inspiration, art and beauty.”

The lineup for the concert was as follows:

- Actor Okieriete Onaodowan, known as Oak, kicked off the concert with a spoken word, which he wrote to promote Co-Existence. An experienced stage actor, Oak is currently playing President James Madison and Hercules Mulligan in the hit Broadway musical "Hamilton.”

- Palestinian rapper SAZ with an Israeli funk band Lucille Crew, performed together under the theme of Co-Existence. Sameh Zakout ("Saz") is a Palestinian rap artist whose music features themes of Palestinian and Arab identity and who calls for peaceful resolution of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Lucille Crew is an international groove collective based in Tel Aviv that fuses elements of hip hop, funk and soul.

- Hip Hop Star Little Simz, the award-winning North London hip hop artist who self-released her critically acclaimed debut album A CURIOUS TALE OF TRIALS + PERSONS, which was named one of the Best Albums of 2015 by Vogue, Entertainment Weekly and more. Little Simz became the first UK rapper to be featured on Forbes Magazine's "30 Under 30" and "Hip Hop Cash Princes" lists

- U.S. Rock Band MAE (M)ultisensory (A)esthetic (E)xperience, an ever-evolving music and art project formed in 2001 in Norfolk, Virginia. MAE consistently delivers emotionally driven cinematic soundscapes for the modern global culture. MAE uses artfully crafted music as a starting point to expand the concept of harmony to include other sensory languages and to place listeners inside of an experience of art for the whole body.

About the Forbes Under 30 Summit

The Forbes Under 30 Summit franchise, one of the company’s most popular franchises, is an extension of Forbes magazine’s annual 30 Under 30 list.

The Forbes Under 30 Summit EMEA brought together 600 of the greatest young entrepreneurs and game-changers from America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, as culled from Forbes’ 30 Under 30 lists, for five days and nights of fostering world-changing ideas and collaboration. Under the theme “Co-Investment, Co-Creation and Co-Existence,” innovators, inventors, mentors and investors focused on entrepreneurship and long-term, market-driven solutions to global problems, proving that growth is possible even in challenging times.

For more details on the Forbes Under 30 Summit EMEA, please visit http://www.forbesconferences.com/event/2016-forbes-under-30-summit-israel/ . On Twitter, follow #Under30Summit.

About Forbes Media

Forbes Media is a global media, branding and technology company, with a focus on news and information about business, investing, technology, entrepreneurship, leadership and affluent lifestyles. The company publishes Forbes, Forbes Asia and Forbes Europe magazines, as well as Forbes.com. The Forbes brand today reaches 94 million people worldwide with its business message each month through its magazines and 37 licensed local editions around the globe, websites, TV, conferences, research, social and mobile platforms. Forbes Media’s brand extensions include conferences, real estate, education, financial services and technology license agreements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  The U.S. Embassy is proud to present:

Step Afrika! Dance Company:

Bringing Communities Together

April 9-14, 2016

 

 

 

 

Step Afrika! promotes dance as an educational tool for young people, focusing on teamwork, academic achievement, and cross-cultural understanding. They have reached tens of thousands of Americans each year through a 50-city tour of colleges and theatres, and perform globally as U.S. cultural ambassadors. Next week, Step Afrika! will bring together diverse communities in Jerusalem, Haifa, Akko, Taibeh, Kibbutz Mizra, and Kfar Yassif, in a series of engaging master classes and workshops, as well as full-fledged performances.

 

Free Performances Open to the Public:

 

  • ·First Station Compound, Jerusalem

April 11, 5:00 PM

In cooperation with Machol Shalem, Step Afrika! will provide an outdoor demonstration of American “stepping,” and discuss the origins of this unique dance style, while engaging the audience and passersby in the art of turning one’s body into a percussive instrument.

  • ·Krieger Center, Haifa

April 12, 7:30 PM

In partnership with the Haifa Municipality, Step Afrika! will give a full, on-stage performance. Students, performers, and the general public are welcome.

Attendance is free, but registration is required due to limited seating. To register for either event, please send an email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., specifying which event you would like to attend.

 

***

Step Afrika!  was founded in 1994 as the first professional company dedicated to the tradition of stepping. It now ranks as one of the top ten African American dance companies in the United States.

The Company blends percussive dance styles practiced by historically African American fraternities and sororities, African traditional dance and influences from a variety of other dance and art forms. Performances are much more than dance shows; they integrate songs, storytelling, humor, and audience participation. The blend of technique, agility, and pure energy makes each performance unique and leaves the audience with their hearts pounding.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Fresh Paint" Contemporary Art & Design Fair opens in Tel Aviv

 

The 8th edition of Fresh Paint Contemporary Art & Design Fair, the largest annual art event in Israel, is taking place between 5-9 April 2016 in the Levant Fair, near the Tel Aviv Port.

 

This year Fresh Paint will host international artists, who will present their works alongside Israeli artists. The international works will include a large installation by Japanese artist Onishi Yasuaki, a performance by the Romanian artist Szilard Gaspar and a photographic series by the Senegal artist Fabrice Monteiro.  

 

Also at the fair: leading galleries that will present projects curated especially for the fair, the independent artists' Greenhouse, an original model, providing exposure to about 50 emerging artists at the beginning of their professional careers.

 

The fair is held in collaboration with the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality, UBS Wealth Management (the main supporter of Art Basel art fair) and Israeli and international leading art institutions.  

 

Attached is one of the works featured in the fair, "Sex and Take Out" by Sarah Bahbah.

 

For further information: http://www.freshpaint.co.il/en

 

 

 

 

 

For the first time in Israel, The world famous and international worldly renowned Musical Ensemble 'Mirabai Ceiba' will give a Premiere Performance on the 13th April at 8.00 p.m. at the 'Samuel Rush' Auditorium at Tel-Aviv University.


The ensemble will give a special, unique and heartwarming concert in dedication to the Non-Profit Organization 'SAVE A CHILD'S HEART', operating at the Wolfson Medical Center in Holon, Israel.


The ensemble will also include the Duo Ensemble – Marcus Siber, Singer, Guitarist, and Angelica Baumbach, Vocalist, Harpist and Keyboard player, alongside with the Great Virtuoso Violinst, Jokish Bogdan, and the Electronic Cellist Yoad Nir.

 


Their international concert celebrates peace, love and joy and emphasizes their concept of music as an international language uniting peoples, cultures and traditions from all over the world.


The Non-Profit Organization 'SAVE A CHILD'S HEART' has saved more than 4.000 childrens' lives from Africa, South America, Europe, Asia and the Middle East.


For reservations please contact the ZAPPA RESERVATION CENTER at *9080 or alternatively at website;


www.zappa-club.co.il

 

 More Info in hebrew   http://www.silviagolan.com/events/421-mirabaiceiba-mirabaiceiba-13-04-2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 'DIPLOMAT' a new book  by ZALMAN SHOVAL


Members of the MFA ,Political and Banking Seniors, friends and relatives arrived at the Celebratory Launch event of the book 'DIPLOMAT written by Zalman Shoval ', that was held on Sunday 3rd of April at the Tel-Aviv Museum.

 

Among the greeters were; Ex Defense and Foreign Minister, Moshe Aarons' The Judge – Alikim Rubinstein, also in past, Cabinet Secretary, and Professor Alex Mintz, - Head of the Institute for Policy and Strategy at the Interdisciplinary Center in Herzliya, Gad Proper, Dan Proper, Yair Hamburger, Gideon Hamburger, Micky Federman, Alfred Akirov, Yaakov Frankel – ex Governor of the Bank of Israel, Eldad Shrim, Musical Producer and others.

About the Book and the writer;

Zalman Shoval is an Israeli politician and diplomat. He is also active in Israel's economic life. He was the Israeli ambassador to the United States in the years 1990–1993 and 1998–2000, and an active member of the Knesset in the Rafi party of Ben Gurion, the State List, and the Likud party.


There is ongoing and widening Kaos in the Middle East, and it looks like it will be around in the coming decades, but there are some things that remain stable and permanent, and in that context, one must emphasize the importance of the special relations between Israel and the United States, despite the international withdrawal status voluntarily expressed, hopefully, on a 'temporary' basis.


So asserts ZALMAN SHOVAL, The only man who has twice filled the most significant post ever in Israel – Ambassador to Washington. Between the years 1990-1993, and 1998-2000, under Four Prime Ministers, so diverse in their character traits and in their approaches. Yiitshak Shamir, Yitshak Rabin, Binyamin Netanyahu, and Ehud Barak, the relations that Mr Shuval so openly talks about. James Baker, the most prominent among the American Foreign Ministers in this modern period says about him; ' There is no man who has done more for the Peace Process than Zalman Shoval.'


Shuval, who arrived as a child to Little Tel-Aviv at the end of the 30' {until today he is a captive of Tel-Aviv's charm}, was drawn to Politics ever since his youth. At 16, he met Moshe Dayan for the first time, and in the following years, a deep and trusting relationship developed between the two. After completing his studies in the United States and Switzerland, Zalman served as Service Officer for the Study of Charge [AMAN] and commenced work in the economic sphere., mainly as a Banker, but as he evidently declares; ' The political bug has never left me'. He was among the founders of the political party RAFI in 1965, and entered the Knesset of David Ben-Gurion in 1970, and was very active in the establishment of the Likud in 1973. During Moshe Dayan's term as Foreign Minister 1977-1979, he was entrusted in Israeli Abroad Information, including the Camp David Conference in 1978, where the peace agreement was signed with the Egyptians.

 


In both his government terms as Ambassador to Israel in the United States, he won favor by his political view and understanding, his talents as a Diplomatic Spokesman, his sympathetic and empathic manner which have given him precedence over previous Israeli Ambassadors, and among his political comrades in the American Government, including the great Jewish Community in the United States. He participated in the Madrid Conference and in the peace talks in Washington. In addition he dealt with very sensitive issues such as the occurring frictions with America on the subject of Military Technology, the efforts and struggles in Iran Nucleation, and he fulfilled the task in obtaining American Guarantees for the U.S.S.R. absorption immigrants back then.


The book, that is written freely and with shades of humor, presents to the reader a wide and curious spectrum of diplomatic activity from within, as it truly is, and defines political and state destinations permeating the horizons in front of us. This book is a MUST for all those who are interested Israel's political and parties' history.

 
 
 

 

 

The Moran Singers Ensemble and the Moran Choir perform in "From Silence I Sing" with guest conductor/ composer Ambroz Copi (Slovenia) at the Israel Conservatory, Tel Aviv

 

The Moran Ensemble Singers and the Moran Choir presented “From Silence I Sing”, an evening of choral works and vocal solos on February 5th 2016 at the Israel Conservatory of Music, Tel Aviv. Guest conductor/composer was Ambrož Čopi (Slovenia).

 

Ambrož Čopi (b. 1973) graduated in Composition from the Ljubljana Conservatory in 1996, then taking post-graduate studies and working as a vocal assistant. He has also worked as a singer. Alongside his work as music teacher in an arts school, he has done much choral conducting, winning several awards as have his compositions. Frequently serving as a jury member in choral events and competitions, Čopi lectures and is involved in choral music seminars in Slovenia and abroad.

 

The evening’s concert took the audience on a flying visit to many corners of the earth, the program including works and composers not heard in this part of the world. To set out on the journey, we heard the Moran Singers Ensemble, conducted by house conductor Guy Pelc, in a superbly crafted and evocative reading of Edward Elgar’s a-cappella romance “My love dwelt in a northern land” (1890) to the richly wrought and melancholic images of a poem of Andrew Lang, its descriptions of nature, weather and time personifying the relationship being recalled.

 

And to eastern Europe and two works of Lithuanian composer Vytautas Miškinis (b.1954), a prolific writer of choral music, with over 250 of his choral works written for children’s choirs. Well-known in his own country but not outside of it, here is a composer writing in the new wave of tonal music. Performed by heart by the Moran Choir (35 singers aged from 12 to 18) and conducted by Moran founder and musical director Naomi Faran, Miškinis’ “Missa Brevis” came across as direct and uncluttered, music accessible, expressive and true to its sacred text, its tenderness and message of peace presented in fine detail, with pianist Oleg Yakerevich’s accompaniment depicting bells in the Kyrie and other subtle musical ideas throughout. Miškinis’ a-cappella “Bonum est confiteri domino” (It is good to praise the Lord, Psalm 92) was sung by the Moran Ensemble Singers and conducted by Čopi. A work sacred and otherworldly but anchored in personal utterance, it was conveyed as a polished assortment of small sections and offering a myriad of contrasts in mood and tempo. We then heard a work of another composer primarily writing choral music – Norwegian Ola Gjeiro (b.1978) – today settled in New York and dividing his time between performing as a professional pianist and composing. The Moran Singers’ Ensemble gave “Ubi Caritas” (Where there is charity) – indeed, a small gem - a reading that was moving and as lush as it was fragile in its harmonic tonings, its course gently flexed.

 

The program included two works by Ambrož Čopi himself; first, an awe-inspiring tonal, a-cappella setting of the St Thomas Aquinas hymn “O Salutaris Hostia”, performed by the Moran Ensemble Singers and directed by the composer; its deep, intimate spirituality was reflected in gently flowing melodies and lavish harmonies, with soloist Shira Cohen finding a happy compromise between soloing and blending:

 

‘O saving Victim, opening wide
The gate of Heaven to us below;
Our foes press hard on every side;
Thine aid supply; thy strength below…’

 

Following performance of a short piece the composer has dedicated to the choir, Ambrož Čopi conducted the Moran Choir in a performance of his “Missa Brevis” (2006) for treble voices, piano and percussion. Opening with a pensive, autumnal soundscape, the choir’s rendition was precise, their unforced singing lending freshness and natural expression to the work’s beauty. The more rhythmical sections, sounding somewhat South American in character, emerged as buoyant but never raucous, the young percussionist’s use of percussion economical, incisive and tasteful. Solos were sung competently and sympathetically by two of the girls.

 

The evening’s choral pieces were interspersed with a number of solos sung by members of the Moran Singers Ensemble. Soprano Shira Cohen offered an unmannered, gentle rendition of two of Aaron Copland’s folk song settings, their style and her interpretation of the ballad “Long time ago” and the Shaker song “Simple Gifts” so representative of the straightforward gestures of American music of the 1950s. This was followed by Efrat Hacohen in a sensuous and engaging performance of Xavier Montsalvatge’s “Cancion de cuna para dormer a un negrito’ (Cradle song for a small black child), its inebriating and gently dissonanced habanera accompaniment suggestive of the mother rocking her baby. Soprano Shani Oshri’s splendid, silken singing of the Thessaloniki Ladino folk lullaby “Nani, nani” (arr. D. Akiva) was communicative and poignant and highlighted by her superb vocal control. Alto Zlata Hershberg was engaging, theatrical and convincing in Alexander Matveev’s dramatic arrangement of a Russian folk song, as she moved back and forth from the role of a fearful child and the calming mother.

 

The concert concluded with a work by one of Estonia’s most prominent composers - Veljo Tormis (b.1930) – whose choral oeuvre numbers more than 500 works, many based on ancient traditional Estonian songs. Composed in 1972 for a-cappella mixed chorus and shaman drum (played by Yakerevich), “Raua needmine” (Curse upon Iron) is based on the Finnish epic “Kalevala”, with added texts of contemporary Estonian poets. Conducted by Ambrož Čopi, the Moran Singers Ensemble contended impressively with the work’s rhythmically daring language, its confrontational and relentless repetitiveness as well as the variety of raw, often harsh sounds – whispering, glissandi, chanting, shouting and primal throat singing – the composer uses to express and evoke his timeless, ritualistic style suited to the work’s message. The audience was challenged to immerse itself in the detail of the long, unremittingly powerful text projected in full onto a screen as the singers addressed the work’s gestures, both musical and verbal:

 

‘Ohoi cursed, evil iron!
Ohoi cursed, evil iron!
Flesh consuming, bone devouring,
Spilling blood, devouring virtue!
Whither comes your cruel cunning,
Haughtiness so overbearing? Fie upon you, evil iron!
Your beginnings reek of malice.
You have risen from villainy …’

 

A concert of interesting programming, “From Silence I Sing” presented the audience with yet another instance of Naomi Faran’s ideals (plus those of her professional team and singers) of deep musical enquiry, articulacy, of the “cultured singing voice” and of polished, detailed performance. Oleg Yakerevich’s refined and imaginative piano accompaniments contributed much to the enjoyment of the evening’s program.

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

 

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special film screening: The Elementary School 28. 3. 2016 at 19h, Tel Aviv Cinematheque

 

Elementary School 
28. 3. 2016 at 19h, Tel Aviv Cinematheque

Czech Centre Tel Aviv is joining the iniciative of worldwide celebration of 80th birthday of Czech actor and screenwriter Zdeněk Svěrák and it organises screening of restored film Elementary School in Tel Aviv. Idea was initiated by Oscar winning film director and son of the birthday honouree, Jan Svěrák and the film will be screened at the same time in more then one hundred movie theatres in the Czech Republic as well as all over the world.

 

This gentle comedy takes place just after World War II., during the academic year 1945-46. Ten-year-old Eda and his friend Tonda attend an elementary school in Prague suburbs. They are pupils of an all-boy class which is famous for its bad behaviour. No wonder one day the teacher is drive out of her mind. Although it seems there exists no remedy, nevertheless… The teacher is replaced by Igor Hnízdo – allegedly the hero of several military operations – an energetic, uncompromising and just man. His only weakness is his grea interest in the fair sex. In no time the little tyrants who have been taken by surprise turn into meek sheep, ready to defend their new teacher at any time and any place. Reticent Eda watches him, comparing him with his own unvaliant father who, in reality, my however have been and probably is much more of an hero…

 

Script writer Zdenek Sverak has created an autobiographical mosaic of his childhood memories, returning to the time when he was ten years old. At this crucial stage, boys are still children but already perceive the adults’ world with great intensity. This extraordinarily ordinary and artfully simple film endowed with intelligent humour is rich in many surprises, secrets, as well as in an understanding attitude toward human weaknesses. The story will no doubt be a refreshing balm for the souls of the viewers who are constantly attacked by violence, cynicism and formal emptiness..

 

 english / hebrew subtitles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Italian Revolution Continues Successfully.

 

Not the revolution you’re thinking of, but the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) revolution still shaking up bella Italia. This week 11 movers and shakers of the Italian LGBT community concluded a short visit to Israel. The tour was hosted by the Israeli Embassy in Rome (under H.E. Ambassador Naor Gillon), and the Foreign Ministry. The purpose: to let the leaders of the LGBT communities in Italy see for themselves the true face of Israel, and to alter the misconceptions and preconceptions fostered by some media outlets. Just as LGBT people themselves suffer under prejudice, misconceptions and intolerance due to misinformation or lack of information, so too does Israel’s image.

 

 

It is no surprise that the initiator of the visit was Angelo Pezzana. He founded “FUORI” (an Italian acronym that translates as the “Italian Revolutionary United Homosexual Front”) way back in 1971. Italy was (and to some extent still is) heavily influenced by the Vatican, so Angelo’s brave coalition 45 years ago is nothing to be sneezed at. Until he retired recently, Angelo owned and ran a Jewish bookstore and Judaica center in Turin. He taught himself Hebrew and was for many years the Chairperson of the Italy-Israel Friendship Association. (Angelo is not Jewish).

 

During their short visit the group heard, among others, presentations by the Tel Aviv Municipality, several LGBT organizations, “New Family”, a gay Christian Arab, a gay Rabbi, representatives of five political parties and the Managing Editor of a major newspaper. In Tel Aviv they visited Meir Park and the Holocaust Memorial for homosexuals murdered by the Nazis, the “Beit Dror” shelter for homeless LGBT youth, and Independence Hall. In Jerusalem they saw the Knesset, had a visit to Yad Vashem and the Jerusalem Open House. Defiantly, the sole Palestinian lesbian organization in Jerusalem refused to cooperate, as did all other Arab organizations, unfortunately.

 

 

Mindless hatred is never productive and is always destructive. Dialog, sharing opinions and learning achieve so more. Just last month Italy joined the family of enlightened nations by finally allowing same-sex couples most (but not all) the rights that up to now have been accorded only to heterosexuals. There is still a way to go; visits like this one can only be good for everyone concerned.

 

 Photos by Yuri Guaiana

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Maestro David Shemer leads the Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra and soloists in two versions of the opera “Pimpinone”

 

The Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra and soloists in two versions of "Pimpinone"

 

Two versions of “Pimpinone” were the Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra’s bill for the 4th concert of the 2015-2016 season. This writer attended the event on February 25th 2016 in the Mary Nathaniel Golden Hall of Friendship of the Jerusalem YMCA. The first setting heard was that of Tomaso Albinoni to the libretto of Pietro Pariati, the second, that of Georg Philipp Telemann, with the same Italian libretto translated into German and revised by Johann Philipp Praetorius. JBO founder and musical director David Shemer conducted the performance (not from the harpsichord), with baritone Guy Pelc as Pimpinone in both settings; mezzo-soprano Anat Czarny played Vespetta in the Albinoni opera, with Einat Aronstein portraying Vespetta in the Telemann version.

 

“Pimpinone” or “The Mismatched Marriage” is a comic intermezzo, the genre of intermezzi buffi serving as lavish entertainment, respite or comic relief between acts of larger operas. There are, in fact, a number of versions of the work’s theme and plot. (Pergolesi’s more frequently performed “La serva padrona” was written in 1733.) Vespetta (little wasp) – a cunning servant girl - and Pimpinone – a wealthy, foolish, gullible old bachelor - are stock 18th century intermezzo characters. Pimpinone engages Vespetta as his maidservant, falls in love with her and marries her. Vespetta quickly turns everything to her advantage and the marriage is conducted totally on her terms, with Pimpinone becoming her victim and forced to weaken to her every whim. “Pimpinone”, a satire on everyday Venetian life, raises the question of conflict between social classes.

 

Albinoni’s “Vespetta e Pimpinone”, one of the earliest surviving Venetian intermezzi, was first performed in 1708 in Venice as an interlude to his own opera “Astarto”; it enjoyed immediate success, becoming a standard work of opera repertoire. In Albinoni and Pariati’s user-friendly opera, its rakish fast succession of brief arias and duets, charming melodies, a quirky use of counterpoint and a parlando style highlighting the amusing text, make for fine entertainment. Anat Czarny’s light, creamy, unforced voice was well suited to the medium as she threw Pimpinone flirtatious looks, turning to the audience saucily to inform it of the cunning Vespetta’s personal agenda. Guy Pelc, not comical enough in his role as the befuddled, stupid and perhaps uncouth Pimpinone (some facial expressions and body language borrowed from the commedia dell’arte would add a little more of the absurd, giving Pimpinone a touch of lust and irritability) as he presented the text with articulate transparency, his experience in the various aspects of Baroque style apparent throughout. Albinoni’s comical writing of the duets, in which each character states conflicting sentiments, came across splendidly. Hebrew and English translations of both “Pimpinone” versions, flashed onto a screen, making sure the listener missed nothing of the whimsical text.

 

For Telemann’s German-language setting of “Pimpinone”, we heard soprano Einat Aronstein as Vespetta, with Pelc as Pimpinone. First performed in 1725 in Hamburg, Telemann adhered to the Hamburg practice of some of the arias being sung in Italian, with the rest of the text in German. Not often heard today, the work represents Telemann’s writing at its best, the composer’s sophisticated musical score coupled with his bent for language and flair for humour on stage. Aronstein presented the upbeat, frilly, flirtatious and mischievous side of the waspish Vespetta, her bright, flexible voice gliding effortlessly up into its high register, as she teased the audience (and poor Pimpinone) with an occasionally over-extended dissonance at the end of an aria. Pelc’s singing flowed in beautifully-formed phrases as he used the composer’s clever onomatopoeic use of words to dress up the absurdity of the situation. In “So that she may speak badly of her husband”, the most dazzling aria of the last intermezzo, young Pelc’s outstanding singing showed his vocal control and elasticity as he shifted back and forth between his natural voice and falsetto in a patter song bristling with mockery, threats and vocal challenges! Then, as in Albinoni’s work, Pimpinone and Vespetta’s marriage troubles come to a head. In the Albinoni version he threatens to beat her with a stick, in the Telemann version it is she who will take a stick to him…such is life in a mismatched marriage.

 

Contrary to the disharmony of the plot, Maestro Shemer led his ensemble of fine instrumentalists in playing that was alive with interest, fine detail and Baroque elegance.

 

Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog


Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog

 

Photo: Dan Porges

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Felicja Blumental Music Center 2016 Guitar Week

This is the “Guitar Week” at the Felicja Blumental Music Center and there is still time for guitar enthusiasts to get tickets.

 

We attended Saturday evening’s concert where world-renowned Italian guitarist Aniello Desiderio charmed the enthusiastic audience. He began his musical career at age 8 in his native Naples and has since won no less than 18 international awards.

A treat for music lovers. The Guitar Week is sponsored by, amongst other organizations, the Romanian Cultural Center in Israel and the Tel Aviv Municipality.

Check the Center’s website http://www.fbmc.co.il/ categoryId=89895 for concerts and ticket information.

 

The Center offers a year-round repertoire of music, appearances and festivals. Besides the intimate concert hall, there is a music library (that was founded in 1951!). The facility also hosts lectures, workshops and even private events.

 

An upcoming festival with an international flavor that will probably be of special interest to the diplomatic community and music lovers alike is the Felicja Blumental International Music Festival in early April. http://en.blumentalfestival.com

 

Music for the heart and soul.

 

 

 

 

Festive Festival Fare at the 2016 Eilat Chamber Music Festival

 

Taking place at the Dan Hotel Eilat from February 3rd to 6th 2016, the 11th Eilat Chamber Music Festival offered a number of events that were different from conventional concert fare, highlighting the fact that this was…a festival, and certainly one of Israel’s best.


The Anderson & Roe Piano Duo’s first performance, “The Rite of Spring”, promised to be a concert played by two young and outstanding pianists, but Elizabeth Joy Roe and Greg Anderson are a duo with a difference! They formed their partnership in 2002 at the Juilliard School of Music and nowadays tour extensively as recitalists and orchestra soloists, they compose and engage in much arranging of works and they present their audiences with action-packed, polished and mind-boggling concerts that keep the listener perched on the edge of his seat. Relaxed and chatty, they talk about the works to be performed. But they bring to the concert hall much more than hype: whether you like their quirky explanations or not, their playing creates a kaleidoscope of vibrant musical canvases. Opening the February 3rd program with Johannes Brahms’ Variations on a Theme by Haydn opus 56B (two pianos), they colored the work with magically sensitive and contrasted playing, fine shaping, majestic gestures and with the mystery of what lies behind sotto voce playing. Their reading of Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring” (one piano) conjured up the power, cruelty and paganism of the ballet’s storyline, gripping the audience with the work’s asymmetry and jarring accents, their musical description of the sword lethal and uncompromising. But their playing was not just muscular: it was strategically timed, conveying the ballet’s message of estrangement and aloneness. Whisking away the intensity of the “Rite of Spring”, Anderson and Roe played their own arrangement of much-loved melodies from Mozart operas, with playful, opera-buffa-joy and wonderfully cantabile melodies, rounding the number off with their virtuosic, full-on “Ragtime alla Turca”. Their “Carmen thriller” arrangement for two pianos set before the listener so many aspects of Bizet’s “Carmen” – the story’s complexity, its love content, the darker side of gypsy life and much fiery energy. And how delicate and filigree-fine their rendition of the Ballet from Gluck’s “Orphée et Eurodice” was, describing love of a totally different nature, the program ending with a touching rendition of Bob Thiele and George David Weiss’s “What a Wonderful World” (1967), Roe and Anderson’s playing sparkling with optimism and tenderness.


A large audience filled the Tarshish Hall at the Dan Hotel on February 6th to hear violinist Marianna Vasileva (Russia-Israel) perform all 24 of Niccolò Paganini’s Caprices. Apart from only one other piece, Paganini’s only violin publication was this set of solo Caprices, published in 1820, probably written between 1801 and 1817. Considered the last word in violin technique, they were dedicated to “all artists” and comprise nearly all his prized violin techniques (they do not include artificial harmonics) in exceptionally demanding settings. Paganini never performed them in public. Not merely etudes, Vasileva has referred to some as “folk music”, with Paganini infusing the miniatures with music he was hearing around him. Vasileva has been working on the pieces for two years and claims that this will be an ongoing project for years to come. Dazzling and, indeed, winning the audience with their intricacies, the artist gave expression to the pieces’ charm and intensity and to the many contrasts between- and within them, to the violin’s many techniques but, above all, to the work’s musical interest. Presenting of the individual character of each piece, she held the listeners’ attention for the duration of the work. For many people attending the recital, it would have been their first encounter with the mystery and inner-voiced tremolo of “The Trill” (no.6), the imitation of wind instruments in “The Hunt” (no.9) and the sheer virtuosity of “The Devil’s Laughter” (no.13).


“Just About Midnight” on February 4th was an opportune time for night owls to indulge in a rich and unique program of classical music, tango, jazz, gypsy- and new music, performed and improvised by two French artists – ‘cellist François Salque and accordionist/composer Vincent Peirani. In fact, Salque, one of the most outstanding and interesting ‘cellists of his generation and no new face to the Eilat Chamber Music Festival, had performed Chopin’s Sonata for ‘Cello and Piano in g-minor opus 65 (piano: Ivan Rudin) the previous day. A personal project of Salque and Peirani’s has been collecting and recording traditional music of Central- and Eastern Europe. The concert opened with a fervent and moving reading of Ernest Bloch’s “Prayer” (1924), followed by the Peirani/Mienniel setting of Astor Piazzolla’s “Alone, All Alone”, commencing as a meditative, nostalgic mood piece, then breaking into exuberant bravura. There was Milena Dolinova/Krystof Maratka’s Czardas IV, beginning with a sweetly sentimental section, to be followed by the wild, brilliant czardas itself and Bohemian composer/’cellist David Popper’s “Hungarian Rhapsody” (1894) also starting in a quasi-improvisational style, sending the ‘cello into its highest register before moving on to its inevitable excited agenda. Salque and Peirani paid vibrant homage to French gypsy culture with their sensitive and imaginative playing of works by Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli. And what could constitute more poignant night music than Vincent Peirani’s “Choral” – a modal piece, evocative of the pipe organ - so introspective, calm and suave. Vincent Peirani’s profound musicianship and aesthetic sense are what put him in a class on his own. Peirani and François Salque’s performance lent the nocturnal concert a classy, sophisticated aura.

 

If concert-goers attending “Breaking Bad” at 23:00 on February 5th were expecting to end the day with a soothing musical “night-cap’, they we presented with a wake-up call to a new concert experience, in which classical music can exist alongside popular-, jazz- and film music. The Belgian-based ensemble “Trilogy” was formed in 2011 by classical violinists Hrachya Avanesyan, Lorenzo Gatto and Yossif Ivanov. The three brilliant artists achieved overnight recognition with their first video “Pulp Fiction”. Addressing the audience, Avanesyan referred to the program as a “summary of the ensemble’s work”. At the Eilat event, the violinists were joined by Alexander Gurning (piano, electronic keyboard) and Eddie Francisque (percussion) in a performance of verve and high amplification! The program opened with Trilogy’s transcription of Vivaldi’s Concerto in a-minor RV522 for three violins and piano Their setting of the Bizet-Giraud “Carmen” Suite was given a sympathetic reading, with John Williams’ dejected and melancholic “Schindler’s List” theme empathic and highly sensitive. The artists’ sense of music as a game to be played was reflected in the ensemble’s arrangement of “Man with a Harmonica” from Ennio Morricone’s 1968 soundtrack to “Once upon a Time in the West”. If in Brahms’ Hungarian Dance no.1 (1869) they offered a mix of mellow playing with Roma-gypsy temperament, the artists’ pulsating, energetic, revved up performance of Soviet-Armenian composer Aram Khachaturian’s “Sabre Dance” (1942) prepared listeners for the energy level of these young players would accelrate as the night wore on. Later items on the program featured such pieces as a medley from “Daft Punk” and music from “Pulp Fiction” in performances of devil-may-care, unleashed energy and undaunted pluck, as the players let their hair down to show festival-goers what classical musicians are made of!

 

Exciting, enriching and of a high standard, the 2016 Eilat Chamber Music Festival drew large crowds to its events. Leonid Rozenberg has been the festival’s general and artistic director since its inception 11 years ago. Concerts were introduced by Yossi Schiffmann. As in former years, the staff of the Dan Hotel (manager: Mr. Lior Mucznik) went out of their way to make concert-goers welcome, adding festival sparkle to the four days.

 

Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

 

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

Roe and Anderson (photo:Maxim Reider)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes from the 2016 Eilat Chamber Music Festival - orchestras without conductors - Concerto Koeln (Germany) and Les Dissonances (France)

 

The 2016 Eilat Chamber Music Festival featured two orchestras playing without conductors…in the conventional sense. Concerto Köln, one of the first orchestras to play in the festival’s 11-year existence, has been involved in historically informed performance for 30 years. As members of a self-governed orchestra, the musicians carry a high degree of responsibility for performance results. Concerto Köln is known for its interest in the performance of little-known Baroque works; this was evident in “Händel and the Italian Baroque”, the ensemble’s first concert on February 5th, which featured Dutch mezzo-soprano Rosanne van Sandwijk. Most of the audience would not have been familiar with the first work – Concerto Grosso opus 5 no.6 in D-major by Evaristo Felice Dall’Abaco (1675-1742) – the performance affirming the argument for hearing more of Dall’Abaco’s music. A composer and performer at the Austrian court of Maximilian II and influenced by Vivaldi’s style, Dall’Abaco’s works have been brought to the public “ear” by Concerto Köln. Other instrumental works on the program were a spirited and well contrasted performance of Vivaldi’s Concerto for ‘Cello, Strings and basso continuo in D-minor RV 407 (soloist: Werner Matzke)and Giovanni Battista Sammartini’s Sinfonia in A-major. Rosanne van Sandwijk performed a splended selection of excerpts from a number of Händel works, opening with “Donna, che in ciel di tanta luce splendi”, highlighting its drama as she held the players in constant eye contact. She gave elegance and delicacy to Ruggiero’s aria from “Alcina”, “Mi lusinga il dolce affetto”, contending well with its rapid Neapolitan runs and trills, offering a well ornamented performance of “Cara Speme” (Giulio Cesare). In (Giovanni Battista Ferrandini or) Händel’s sacred cantata “Il pianto di Maria Vergine”, Sandwijk gave gripping, poignant and vehement expression to Mary’s grief, reproachful anger and torment.

 

Concerto Köln’s second concert featured four of the six Brandenburg Concertos - Italian-flavoured concerti grossi presented by J.S.Bach to the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721. With each concerto differently scored, here was an opportunity to hear Concerto Köln’s various players in different ensemble combinations. They began with a fresh, vivid reading of No.3, its minimal second movement remaining enigmatic to many of us, then to No.5, graced with transverse flute (Cordula Breuer) with Gerald Hambitzer giving life to the harpsichord solo - its first big break in concerto history. Then to No.6, with its unconventional scoring of strings and harpsichord but no violins, concluding with the hearty Concerto No.4, with its charming recorder duo team (Wolfgang Dey, Cordula Breuer) and truly inspired violin playing on the part of first violinist Evgeny Sviridov.

 

David Grimal (photo: Maxim Reider)
Also playing with no conductor, or might one say “self-conducted”, Les Dissonances (France), a small orchestral collective established in 2004 by violinist David Grimal, performs the major works of orchestral repertoire up to contemporary music. In “A Mozart Celebration” Grimal (soloist) and his players, many of them young, presented the last three of Mozart’s five violin concertos and, as in Mozart’s day, they were performed without a conductor, with Grimal glancing at players here and there but not engaging in actual conducting gestures. This approach makes more demands on the players, therefore, with the Dissonances members proving that they were indeed polished in the art of producing music with accuracy, coordination and clean entries, as they watched each other intently, sensing the music together. Their reading of Violin Concerto no.3 in G-major K.216 bristled with clarity, lyricism and some splendid wind-playing, with Grimal shaping phrases with much beauty. In the more extroverted and virtuosic Violin Concerto no.4 in D-major K. 218, its surprise package offering a stately gavotte played over a drone in the third movement, Grimal did not allow virtuosity to get in the way of the 19-year-old Mozart’s style of charm and elegance. As to Violin Concerto no.5 in A-major K. 219, Grimal and his players set before the audience the work’s originality, imaginative structure, drama and daring, some meaningful rubati adding to the graceful fragility of the second movement. Following this was Mozart’s unorthodox utterance within the gracious final Rondo movement – an aggressive, clanging, percussive reference to the faux-Turkish music popular at the time. With the violin concertos written without cadenzas, here was Grimal’s opportunity to express his own ideas of the cadenza improvisation. Even if some listeners were surprised or puzzled by some unpredictable turns, I think Mozart would have been happy with Grimal’s daring, his unconventional inventiveness and freedom.

 

In their second concert - “The Four Seasons” - David Grimal and Les Dissonances chose to perform Antonio Vivaldi’s “Le quattro staggione” in dialogue with Astor Piazzolla’s “The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires”, presenting each composer’s depiction of each season. The score of Vivaldi’s composition, written around 1723, one of the earliest examples of program music, was accompanied by poems (possibly written by Vivaldi himself) describing the feelings associated with each season:
SUMMER
‘Under the heavy season of a burning sun
Man languishes, his herd wilts, the pine is parched
The cuckoo finds its voice and, chiming in with it,
The turtle-dove, the goldfinch…’


Piazzolla’s original version of “Cuatro Estaciones Porteñas” (1965-1970), a set of four tango compositions describing the four seasons in Buenos Aires, was scored for violin (viola), piano, electric guitar, double bass and bandoneon (a large button accordion, of which the composer was a virtuoso player.) From 1966-1968, Russian composer Leonid Desyatnikov arranged the pieces to be more similar in construction to those of Vivaldi – each given three sections – and with some quotes from the Vivaldi work. Not the first ensemble to engage in this meeting of “strange bedfellows” forming an alliance of works from different two continents (in recognition of which Desyatnikov threads elements of Vivaldi’s “Winter” into Piazzolla’s “Summer”!) and composed 250 years apart, Grimal and Les Dissonances took the bull by the horns and presented the audience with the rich and changing canvases, their alternation presenting an exciting challenge to the listener. Some found the changes jarring. Not I. This was fine festival fare and superbly performed. The artists’ playing of the much-loved Vivaldi violin concertos was direct, fresh and poignant, rich in timbral variety and in the inspiration generated by living nature and its secrets, the concertos flexed in accordance with the music’s innate elasticity. Grimal’s playing was poetic, moving and personal in expression. Piazzolla-Desyatnikov’s tango-inspired work, sharing with Vivaldi’s the depiction of all four seasons and the violin solo-string orchestra setting, weaves a vivid tapestry of European musical features, jazz and Argentinean tango, of abrupt shifts and the use of strings in a percussive manner. Swinging between the devil-may-care boldness and melancholy of Piazzolla’s writing, Grimal and his players brought out the vitality, earthiness, the wit and unabashed sentimentality of the Buenes Aires personality, giving themselves to the raw reality, fire, passion and sensuality of the music of Piazzolla’s native Argentina…and all this with no conductor!

 

Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

 

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 Photo Maxim Reider

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bulgaria Embassy “Doors of Hope and Music for the Soul.” Delightful Music and Photographs.

 

The setting was intimate and unusual, the music was gracious and unusual, and the photographs were delightful – and unusual.

 

Yesterday at the Immanuel Church in Tel Aviv’s historic German-American Colony, the Bulgarian Ambassador to Israel, His Excellency Dimitar Mihaylov, the Embassy of Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Cultural & Information Center hosted a small gathering of diplomats and friends to a concert of organ music. The concert title was “Doors of Hope and Music for the Soul.” The guests were privileged to hear a concerto played by Professor Sabin Levi of the National Academy of Music in Sofia, and at the same time to view a series of slide photographs, the ‘Doors of Hope’ – pictures taken of doors by Mrs. Nora Mihaylova.

 

 

In one of his previous diplomatic postings, Ambassador Mihaylov & Mrs. Mihaylova lived in Syria. Needless to say, many of the beautiful images were from the old city of Damascus, but also from Greece, the USA, and of course Israel – Jaffa, Jerusalem, Akko and Tel Aviv, to name a few. The juxtaposition of the images, combined with the music in the unusual setting was very special.

 

Guests include Mr. Moni Bar, Honorary Consul of Bulgaria, diplomats, friends and Bulgarian society in Israel (including former Tel Aviv councilor and former Bulgarian, Ms. Shelly Hoshen, who celebrated her birthday as well.)

 

In his brief welcome to the guests before the performance, the Ambassador added: “What unites us are beauty and art, culture and music”. The evening proved him right: A Jewish Bulgarian professor playing international organ music for the soul in a church in Israel to an enthusiastic mixed audience viewing doors of hope from around the world.

 

 

The cocktail reception following the concert was a lovely intermezzo allowing guests to mingle over a glass of wine and snacks.

 

 Photos Silvia G. Golan

 

 

 

 

Tourism seminar:

The Embassy of India and India Tourism Office Frankfurt organised a tourism seminar on February 11, 2016 in Renaissance Hotel, Tel Aviv. The seminar was attended by more than 40 tour operators and tour agents in Israel.
Charge de Affaires Dr. Anju Kumar delivered opening remarks. She spoke about the tourism potential in India and highlighted various sectors such as wild life, luxury tourism, surfing, Jewish heritage and region specific tourism as new facets for promoting Israeli tourism to India.

 

 


Professor Agami, retired professor of Botany in Tel Aviv University and expert on nature and wild life tourism gave a presentation on the vast wild life and nature tourism in India. He focused on nature reserve parks and wildlife attractions. Dani Abrahami, spoke the possibilities of short trips to India. He highlighted tourism potential of India as a family destination as well. Mr. Rafi Peled, lecturer at the Tel Aviv University for Sanskrit an expert on Yoga tours talked about Yoga Tourism while Roee Shentiel, an enthusiast surfer, and video editor of MAKO spoke on the huge potential of surf tourism in India and the surfing destinations like Pondicherry, Kerala and Karnataka.


There was a brainstorming session on “How to promote tourism to India” The panel speakers were Dr. Anju Kumar, Charge de Affaires, Mr. Ramkumar Vijayan, Assistant Director, Government of India, Tourism Office, Frankfurt, Mr. Rafi Peled, expert on Yoga Tourism, Mr. Danny Abrahami from Hodu.co.il and Mr. Barak Leibovitch from Eco Tours.

 


A Rajasthani folk group led by Mr. Esak Khan gave a charming performance at the event. The seminar was followed by a cocktail reception.

 

 

Photo  : Mikel

 

 

 

 

 

Classical guitar recital and master class performed by Mircea Gogoncea during the Tel Aviv Guitar Week, The Felicja Blumental Music Center, March 1-2, 2016

 

photo source: http://www.fbmc.co.il/?categoryId=103473
The Tel Aviv Guitar Week will take place between February 26, 2016 - March 2nd, 2016 at the Felicja Blumental Music Center.


With the support of the Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv, Romania will be represented in the international program by the young guitarist Mircea Gogoncea, who will perform a classical guitar recital on March 1st, at 21:00, and a master class on March 2nd between 10:00-17:00 at the Felicja Blumental Music Center in Tel Aviv (26 Bialik St.).


The musical program of the recital includes:
Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco - Capriccio Diabolico, Op. 85a
Enrique Granados - 8 Valses Poéticos
Joaquin Rodrigo - Tres Piezas Españolas
Benjamin Britten - Nocturnal After John Dowland, op.70
Joaquin Clerch - Guitarresca
Niccolò Paganini - Caprice no.5
Tuesday, March 1st, 2016, at 21:00, tickets and more details: 03-6201185 or online http://www.fbmc.co.il/?categoryId=103473
More details about the master class: 052-2867856


Mircea Gogoncea (www.mirceagogoncea.com ), born in Bucharest, started playing the guitar at the age of 4 and has since performed on 4 continents, having been invited as a guest on more than 350 concerts, radio and TV shows. Upon graduating from high school at the age of 17, he was the Romanian student with the highest number of awards, and to date, has won a total of 153 prizes for music and 7 for his achievements in other spheres of the arts and sciences. Among the most prestigious of these have been the 1st prize at the Julián Arcas Guitar Competition in Almería, the 1st prize at the GFA Youth Solo Competition in Los Angeles, and the Audience Prize at the Francisco Tárrega Competition in Benicassim, Spain.
He made his orchestra debut at the age of 13 together with the National Radio Orchestra of Romania playing the 1st concerto op. 30 by Giuliani. In August 2014, he made his Chinese debut performing a full solo and chamber recital in the China Concert Hall in Beijing, as well as in Shanghai's oldest concert hall (the Lyceum Theatre), as part of a tour that has been continued in the summer of 2015.
In March 2014, he recorded his first album with eminent sound engineer John Taylor in London, featuring music from his China tour. During his studies, he maintains a regular performing career, especially in Europe and Asia.
He studied with Joaquín Clerch at the Robert Schumann Hochschule Düsseldorf and Michael Lewin at the Royal Academy of Music in London, where he finished his master degree in the summer of 2015. In June 2014, he was awarded the inaugural David Russell Prize at the Royal Academy of Music.


The complete program of the Tel Aviv Guitar Week: http://www.fbmc.co.il/?categoryId=97197

 

 Photo provided by Romanian embassy

 

 

Notes from the 2016 Eilat Chamber Music Festival - three chamber music concerts

 

The 11th Eilat Chamber Music Festival took place at the Dan Eilat Hotel from February 3rd to 7th 2016. Azure skies, the sparkling indigo blue waves of the Red Sea - home to flotillas of small yachts - and the relaxed feel of Israel’s southernmost city welcomed the many festival-goers who attended the concerts taking place in the Tarshish Hall and the larger Big Blue Hall of the Dan Hotel.

 

“From Russia with Love” opened the festivities, with Franz Schubert’s Sonata in A-minor D821 “Arpeggione”, performed by Israeli ‘cellist Hillel Zori and Russian pianist Ivan Rudin: Zori gave poignant expression to the singing qualities, harmonic interest and contrasts of Schubert’s sound world, with Rudin giving the stage to Zori all the way. However, in three of Liszt’s “Transcendental Études”, Rudin wielded the piano with the authority of the lion tamer: his playing bristled with fantasy, dynamic variety, warmth and spontaneity, at times meditative, at others, vehement. Rudin was then joined by young violinist Marianna Vasileva (Russia-Israel) in Robert Schumann’s Sonata for violin and piano No.1 in A-minor. The two young virtuoso artists took on board the work’s quicksilver fluctuations and temperament with playing that was both intense and lyrical, well nuanced, finely coordinated and flexible. Together with Ivan Rudin, François Salque (France), no new face to the Eilat Chamber Music Festival, performed Frédéric Chopin’s Sonata for ‘cello and piano in G-minor opus 65, a momentous work in that it was the last Chopin published and in which he himself performed; it also represents the composer’s struggle with the ‘cello-piano medium and probably with his separation from George Sand. The artists gave a vigorous, noble and carefully balanced reading of this autumnal work.

 

Concert no.4 was a recital by violinist Yossif Ivanov and pianist Alexander Gurning, two outstanding young Belgian artists, both members of the unconventional ensemble – Trilogy. Their transparent sound, delicately shaped phrases, incisive playing and off-beat sforzandi (3rd movement) of Beethoven’s Violin Sonata opus 12 no.1 in D-major made for a fine representation of the composer’s early- but already distinctive style. In Edvard Grieg’s Sonata no.3 in C-minor opus 45, the artists addressed the work’s darker colorings and intensity, its lyricism, subtlety and the work’s references to the composer’s national music. Then to Igor Stravinsky’s Divertimento for violin and piano (1928) based on his ballet music to “The Fairy’s Kiss” and constructed around some melodies of Tchaikovsky. Also tinted with folk music features, the work held the audience’s attention with its rich canvas of sweet melodies, rich harmonic variety, heavy ostinatos, its fantasy and unpredictable changes. The recital concluded with Maurice Ravel’s “Tzigane”, in which both Ivanov and Gurning’s technical agility, fired by their own temperament and spontaneity, captured the composer’s interest in gypsy- and Hungarian culture.

 

For chamber music aficionados, Trio Wanderer’s performance was a reason to visit the 2016 festival. This was the second time the French trio has performed at the Eilat Chamber Music Festival. All three players were graduates from the Paris Conservatoire before studying at the Bloomington School of Music and the Juilliard School. Today, violinist Jean-Marc Phillips-Varjabédian and ‘cellist Raphaël Pidoux have teaching posts at the Paris Conservatoire; Vincent Coq teaches at the Haute École de Musique, Lausanne. Joseph Haydn’s Trio in C-major Hob.XV:27 (1797) was a fine opener, with much fresh, positive and communicative playing and Classical elegance. The first of a set of three trios, they were published as “Sonatas for the Pianoforte with Accompaniment of Violin and Violoncello”, showing where Haydn’s demands were (and they were well met by Vincent Coq), his range and writing for the keyboard pointing to the fact that it would have been played on a large English grand piano. In Franz Schubert’s Piano Trio no.2 in E-flat major, opus 100 D.929, the artists negotiated the appealing and majestic Allegro movement splendidly, with its Schubertian major-minor duality, to be followed by Pidoux’ sombre and meditative playing of the haunting ‘cello melody in the Andante movement. With tempos never achingly slow in any one movement, the artists stood back to present Schubert’s emotional world, its tensions and nostalgia relieved by good-natured lightness of texture as they attentively addressed each human gesture and mood. The concert ended with Piotr Ilych Tchaikovsky’s Trio in A-minor opus 50 (1882), a large-scale work on many levels, a work dedicated to the memory of Nicholas Rubenstein (brother of pianist and composer Anton Rubenstein) but also colored by Tchaikovsky’s own melancholic state of mind. The artists gave expression to the composer’s intense emotionalism and melodiousness in the opening elegiac movement. The simple folk-like theme (introduced by the piano) provided the subject for the eleven variations of the second movement, in which the trio presented each with its individual character – the Scherzo of Variation 3, the sweeping minor lines of Variation 4, the music box/drone effect of Variation 5, the elegant waltz of Variation 6, the contrapuntal interweaving of Variation 8, the Mazurka in Variation 10. Then, in the Finale, beginning with a jubilant variation, the artists take the listener back to the heavy-heartedness and mourning of the first movement, leaving the listener coming to grips with the intensely sad final layering of a tragic funeral march with the first movement theme, then fading and dying away. Trio Wanderer’s convincing and moving reading of the work left the audience in silence at its conclusion…laudation well earned by the superb performance of Trio Wanderer. For its encore, Trio Wanderer performed Ernest Bloch’s Nocturne no.2.

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

 

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 Photo  Maxim Reider

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In “A Celebration of Two Pianos” a new piano duo on the Israeli concert scene – Ariel Halevy and Misha Zartsekel – played to a full house at the Felicja Blumental Music Center (Tel Aviv) on January 21st 2016. Born in Jerusalem, Ariel Halevy began his piano studies at the Conservatory of the Jerusalem Academy of Music, receiving bachelor and master’s degrees from the Mannes School of Music (New York). As a soloist and recitalist he performs internationally, also leading a busy teaching life. In 2015, he recorded late Brahms piano works for the RomeoRecords label. Born in Rostov, southern Russia, Misha Zartsekel moved to Moscow at age 9. He immigrated to Israel in 2000, working with Rietta Lisokhin in Haifa as well as Prof. Itzhak Katz and Yaron Rosenthal at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance. A recitalist and chamber musician, he has soloed with orchestras in Israel and abroad.


The program opened with Johann Sebastian Bach’s Concerto for two Harpsichords in C-major BWV 1061, the composer’s only work for two keyboards. Probably originally composed for two harpsichords from the outset, an orchestral accompaniment was added, possibly not by Bach. In the latter, the keyboard instruments play less against the orchestra, conversing more with each other, so that the two keyboards alone produce a full and satisfying musical setting. And now that we have come a safe distance from the stringency of the Authentic Early Music Movement, it is time to reconsider the performance of Bach on the piano. Halevy and Zartsekel gave a bold, clean and fresh reading of the concerto, their use of the sustaining pedal never blurring a line as they presented each motif with articulacy. Their absolute precision of timing provided a most splendid basis for the counterpoint to play out its complex game of melodic strands. Following the personal expression of the 2nd movement – Adagio ovvero Largo – in which the artists allowed themselves immerse themselves within the affect, they gave an exhilarating, dynamic and contrasted reading of the final movement – Fuga – a true celebration of the king of Baroque contrapuntal forms.


Johannes Brahms was introduced to a set of divertimenti for winds attributed to Haydn in 1870. He liked the theme of the second, the Chorale St. Antoni, a hymn sung by pilgrims on St. Anthony’s Day, copying the melody into his notebook. In 1873, he showed the two-piano version of his variations on the theme to Clara Schumann; she and Brahms gave it its first airing at a private gathering in Bonn that year. An orchestral version followed, being referred to as opus 56a, whereas the piano version is 56b, was published later. Critical of his own previous- but well-received sets of variations and those of his contemporaries, he wrote to violinist Joseph Joachim in 1856, claiming that in writing variations “we cling nervously to the melody…we don’t handle it freely” and “we merely overload it”. Brahms’ “Variations on a Theme by Haydn” were a turning point on that score. They are also a mammoth undertaking on the part of the pianists. Halevy and Zartsekel gave a rich rendition of Brahms’ “orchestration” of the piano. Nuanced with the strong, rewarding timbres of the Romantic soundscape, the artists’ playing took the listener from lyrical, singing melodies, to moments of urgency, to the sober, haunting message of the “minore” Variation IV, to a variation of breathless garrulousness that pushes bar-lines aside as it forges its way ahead (Variation V), to chordal textures, to the lovingly-treated and gently hesitating personal utterances of the Siciliano ((Variation VII), to the illusive sleight-of-hand of the last variation, ending with the wink of an eye. Their committed playing of the massive Finale endorsed Brahms’ aim to extend the boundaries of the variation form.


Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Suite No.1 opus 5, the “Fantasie-Tableaux”, inspired by a stay in the Russian countryside, was the composer’s first attempt at writing program music. It was written when the composer was just 20 years old. The work, however, shows a mature approach to the technical, tonal and interpretive resources of the two-piano medium. Each movement is headed by a quotation from one of four poets. Halevy and Zartsekel created each of the tableaus insightfully, lending magic and luxuriant colour to the layering of the opening Barcarolle, with its underlying hint of sadness, then evoking an intense description of night “La nuit…l’amour” (Night…Love), the cascading scales and copious trills forming the material of fantasy. A quote from Lord Byron’s poem “Parisina” introduces “La nuit”:


“It is the hour from when the boughs
The nightingale’s high note is heard;
It is the hour – when lovers’ vows
Seem sweet in every whisper’d word;
And gentle winds and waters near,
Make music to the lonely ear…”


“Les larmes” (Tears) began with an almost visual picture of single teardrops falling onto a bare soundscape; then, as the textures fill out, the artists take the listener into the inner regions of the senses, the “sculpted” tears ever returning, laden with longing. Sweeping away the melancholy state of mind of the previous movements, “Pâques” (Easter) is an exuberant and extroverted depiction of bells ringing out on Easter morning, the characteristic “noise” and repetitiveness of bells present in a myriad of astounding textures. Beyond the technical versatility and strength required in playing the “Fantasie-Tableaux”, this performance was clearly the result of deep enquiry into the fine details and meaning of this masterpiece.


Ending on a more light-hearted note, the artists performed W.A.Mozart’s Sonata in D-major for Two Pianos K.448, the composer’s only work for two pianos. This was not one of the composer’s duets played by him and his sister; indeed, the first piano part was played by Josepha von Auernhammer, a young woman who, it seems, had designs on the still single Mozart in 1781. In this work, constituting Mozart at his most galant, Halevy and Zartsekel brought the spirit of the Viennese salon and its fine entertainment to the audience at the Blumental Center, with Mozart’s graceful, songful music, its elegance and exhilarating virtuosity amounting to a true masterwork. In playing that was solid, positive and well contrasted, the opening movement breathed Mozart’s joy and positive outlook, also his modesty, as the two artists listened, matched and supported each other, with the Andante (2nd movement) setting the listener’s heart afloat with its charm and tender gestures, the artists’ phrases finely chiselled. With the engaging energy of the Allegro molto, the artists sent the audience home with a sense of well-being in which Mozart’s playful, refreshingly naïve and carefree agenda was alive with the joy of the piano duo.

 

A duo for only a year, Misha Zartsekel and Ariel Halevy share the music with warm resonance, clarity, precision and well balanced sonorities, with a strong sense of cooperation and of sharing.

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

 

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 

 

 

 

 

"So French, So Good"  Fourth Annual French Culinary Week February 7-12

 

28 French chefs are bringing the best of France's culinary heritage to 20 restaurants and 4 bakeries in 6 Israeli cities: Tel Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem, Be'er Sheva, Akko, Tiberias

 

On Sunday, February 7th, Israeli and international diplomats, businessmen, and media came together at the French Ambassador's residence for the most savory form of diplomacy—culinary diplomacy.


The evening marked the launch of “So French, So Good”, an annual week-long festival celebrating French culinary heritage, and connecting French and Israeli economic, cultural, and culinary interests. This year's festival was held in conjunction with the Toulouse municipality, Israeli supermarket chain Shufersal, Grey Goose vodka, Fly Card (the credit card of El-Al airlines), and JCDecaux Israel.


As part of the week-long celebration, 28 top French chefs worked with Israeli chefs at 20 restaurants and 4 bakeries all around Israel to prepare special menus highlighting the best of French cuisine. This year for the first time, French bartenders arrived to create cocktails complementing the meals.

 


This year's festival focused on Toulouse, the fourth-largest metropolitan area in France. The delegation of French chefs was led by Gomez Guillaume, the head chef of Élysée Palace, the residence of the French President, and including a number of chefs from Toulouse, led by Michel Sarran.


Israelis will also be able to satisfy their appetites for French cuisine at Shufersal branches, which are stocking an exclusive collection of top-quality French products as part of their "French Party" special.


Social activism played a central role in French Culinary Week as well. A number of Israeli charities were chosen as special beneficiaries. The visiting French chefs will be performing cooking workshops for charities, including the Bialik Rogozin campus for immigrant children in south Tel Aviv, children of the SOS youth villages, a women's shelter in Tira, and other charities. In addition, Israeli non-profit Leket will be collecting food all week long from the participating restaurants, and the French Embassy will be holding a special food-donation evening in conjunction with the Latet ("to Give") organization.


The opening event for French Culinary Week was held at the home of Ambassador Patrick Maisonnave. The mayors of Tel Aviv-Yafa, Jerusalem, Haifa, Acco, Be'er Sheva and Tiberias were invited to the event, and the mayor of Toulouse sent a representative to speak on his behalf. In addition to a variety of French delicacies prepared for the event, food-inspired artwork was also featured.

 

 

Ambassador Maisonnave addressed the guests, before introducing Shufersal CEO Itzik Abercohen, and representatives of Grey Goose Vodka and the Toulouse municipality to speak. Ambassador Maisonnave stressed the cultural and commercial ties between Israel and France that French Culinary Week seeks to advance. The ambassador noted that the event continues to grow from year to year (in 2014, ten chefs were flown in; last year the number rose to 19, and this year reached 28) and pledged to ensure that the event would continue to grow accordingly. For his part, Abercohen spoke about the response of consumers to the new products being stocked, and offered his own promise to do all he could to expand the supply of high-quality French food products available at Shufersal branches. After the speeches, the visiting French chefs , along with their Israeli counterparts, were called on stage to be formally recognized. Following that, the main course was served—including of course an entire room dedicated to wines and cheeses.

 

 

On Thursday, February 11, French Culinary Week will culminate with a series of workshops. The visiting French chefs will deliver cooking and baking workshops to the chosen charities, and a special workshop will be taught by Alexis St. Martin, Martial Enguehart and Ridha Khader at the Sheraton hotel, from 13:00-17:00, as part of a special tourism cooperation initiative launched by Israel and France in 2011.

 

 Photos Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tel Aviv Samsung Marathon 2016 Nonstop Running, Nonstop Party 42 km around the city, 42 things to do in 42 hours in Tel Aviv

 

Tel Aviv is the Nonstop City, where people party nonstop. Once a year, we add to the nonstop party the Tel Aviv Samsung Marathon – the biggest sporting event in Israel with 40,000 participants, this year taking place on the 26th of February, 2016.
This year, the Tel Aviv Marathon is an urban route and the 42 km will intertwine with the city's beating heart. We recommend runners to not only catch a glimpse of the main square, a remarkable restaurant and run the 42km, but to stay in Tel Aviv for 42 hours to experience the city. In the morning, run past a trendy bar in the marathon, and in the evening, sit there and enjoy a drink.


The Tel Aviv Marathon's route begins at the Tel Aviv Convention Center located in northern Tel Aviv. The course leads the runners to the Tel Aviv boardwalk and the opportunity to run along the shore of the Mediterranean Sea and white sandy beaches. The route is also a run through history when it arrives in Jaffa, Tel Aviv's old city and one of the most ancient port cities in the world. At this point the track routes in to the city center, usually bustling with activity but on the day of the marathon the Nonstop City stops to cheer the runners on.


Here are 42 things to do in 42 hours in Tel Aviv:

 

  1. Run the Tel Aviv Marathon!

  2. Relax on 14 km of white sandy beaches and swim in the Mediterranean Sea.

  3. Jaffa is one of the most ancient active ports in the world; every visit to Tel Aviv must include a long stroll through the streets of Jaffa, and its wonderful flea market and amazing fish restaurants and fishermen.

  4. Enjoy the street library on Rothschild Blvd. with lounge chairs and free books.

  5. Walk the streets of Florentin neighborhood, recently awarded one of the most hipster neighborhoods in the world and get a glimpse of great graffiti.

  6. Ride our Tel-O-Fun bike sharing system across the flat, beach-side city.

  7. Run your practice run before the marathon from Tel Aviv Port to Jaffa Port along the beach promenade.

  8. Very close to the Marathon's kick-off point you can board our hot air balloon and overlook the whole marathon's route.

  9. Stretch out before and after the marathon at one of our open-air gym facilities.

  10. Try to follow the steps at Israeli folk dancing near Gordon beach.

  11. Play matkot (the Israeli version of beach paddle ball) on Metzizim beach.

  12. Get a glimpse of the whole city from the highest observatory at the Middle East at "Mitzpe 49".

  13. Breakfast in Tel Aviv is served all day long. 24/7 breakfast at Benedict.

  14. You must be sports fans if you are in town for the marathon – be sure to visit the Olympic experience.

  15. Hop on a roller coaster at the Luna Park.

  16. You must eat at this Israeli chef's eatery where everything goes in a pita, Hamiznon.

  17. If you're already at the beach, why not visit the Tel Aviv Port? Shops, food, great atmosphere and beautiful people are waiting for you there.

  18. Go back in time where old meets new at Hatachana  

  19. This pizza is famous for its squares: Tony Vespa.

  20. The small, narrow streets of Neve Tzedek, one of the most beautiful places in Tel Aviv nick-named 'Little Paris'.

  21. Experience the old vs. the new in Tel Aviv on Rothschild Blvd.: startup companies alongside original Bauhaus style architecture.

  22. Visit the Independence Hall where the State of Israel was declared.

  23. How about some Thai flavors?  Eat at the Thai House.

  24. Try fresh juice from juice stands to freshen up with freshly squeezed from a variety of local fruits.

  25. Rush over after the marathon to view the Flamenco dance show by "Los Vivancos".

  26. This bar won an award for the best bar in the Middle East – Imperial Cocktail Bar.

  27. Enjoy the show by "Voca People".

  28. You can try Israeli music, with Israel legendary singer Shalom Hanoch.

  29. Maybe a rock concert? The Israeli band Monica Sex is on.

  30. And if you want some international music, it's available also Greg Dullin is coming to perform at Tel Aviv.

  31. If art is your thing, you can check out the exhibitions presented in town around the variety of museums like The Tel Aviv Museum of Art.   

  32. You must bear gifts while returning home! The best place for arts and crafts is the artist market at Nachlat Binyamin.   

  33. Visit the authentic Ha'carmel Market and try our local delight: Halva!

  34. Definitely try Hummus in Abu Hassan.

  35. The city's main square is Rabin Square, hosting the Tel Aviv Marathon Expo.

  36. The best Asian food in Tel Aviv: Taizu.

  37. Eat in one of the 400 vegan-friendly restaurants across town.

  38. Visit the beautiful Sarona Compound.

  39. You can even wakeboard at LakeTLV.

  40. Have a glass of wine at Jajo Bar to kick off the night.

  41. Even when you are in an urban sphere, you can experience nature in an innovative way at a night safari.

  42. Welcome the Shabbat in at Drummer Beach, adjacent to the Dolphinarium beach, on Friday afternoon.

 Photo Ronen Topelberg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tel Aviv, The Smartest City in the world is now also a Smart Tourism City

 

Tel Aviv was awarded Smartest City in the World in 2014 and was ranked the #1 startup ecosystem outside of the United States in 2015. In addition, the city was recently ranked as one of the top tourist destinations by Lonely Planet.
Nowadays, Tel Aviv is investing in becoming a Smart Tourism City, combining its specialties in the field of tourism and technology.

 

On February 9-10, 2016, IMTM (International Mediterranean Tourism Market), the largest tourism fair in the Middle East, will take place at the Tel Aviv Convention Center in Israel. The fair provides tourism professionals with an opportunity to meet colleagues, buyers, suppliers and exhibitors from Israel and overseas.

 

The IMTM will feature 2 major events in the field of Smart Tourism:


Futurism.com: an Innovation conference, featuring panels with fascinating and prominent keynote speakers from around the world, relating to Smart Tourism. During the conference the winner of Tel Aviv Mayor's Smart Tourism Award will be announced.


The Digital Travel Dome: an exhibition featuring technological breakthroughs and startups with the latest innovation in the field of tourism.

Here are some examples of Smart Tourism Apps, all made in Tel Aviv:

Sidekix: helps you make the most of each walk by personalizing your route based on what you want to see or do along the way.


Eatwith: a global community that lets you enjoy authentic and intimate dining at a local's home.


LocalYoo: enables you to explore your destination from the local perspective: to discover all the little secrets that are known only to the ones living in the city.


Jettaplus: an online marketplace that allows travelers to trade their non-refundable plane tickets and get paid by people who look for cheap flights.


Roomer: connects travelers that have to cancel and who are stuck paying for an empty hotel room with the travelers looking for a last minute sweet deal.


FairFly: enables travelers who’ve already purchased an airline ticket to rebook their ticket when a better priced option becomes available.


Bossee: provides a fast way to build an itinerary around the schedule of business travelers in order to create a unique experience that they can hold on to while also accomplishing their business-needs.


Booksonmap: connects between book quotes, and places on the map where they took place.


Dotz: connects between those countless Dotz that make a city: parks, restaurants, galleries, shows, cool spots & amazing people.


Kiki: A unique platform for the international gay community combining a designated social network with upscale tourism and exclusive nightlife packages.

 

 

 

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