President Rivlin hosts Christian community leaders for reception marking civil New Year

 

President Rivin: "A faithful Jew cannot be anti-Christian or anti-Muslim."

 

"We all have a duty, at the beginning of the New Year, and every day, to stand together, and show the world that the conflict in this region is not a war about religion, it is a war against hate."

 

President Reuven Rivlin this morning (Monday), hosted the traditional annual reception for leaders of Israel's Christian communities to mark the civil New Year. Speaking at the event along with the President was Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, His Beatitude Theophilos III. In addition, the event was attended by heads of various churches in Israel, senior members of the community, and representatives of the Israeli government.

 

President Rivlin began by noting that the last year had marked fifty years since the Nostra Aetate declaration, which defined the Catholic Church's policy against anti-Semitism and - as the President noted - paved the way for dialogue between the Jewish and Catholic communities. The President said, "I was honored this year, to meet with the Pope in the Vatican, where we spoke about how this relationship has grown stronger over the years. I appreciate very much what he said against anti-Semitism, and against converting Jews. His message of understanding and acceptance reflects both Christian and Jewish ideas – 'Love your neighbor, like yourself'. Pope Francis said, 'A true Christian cannot be an anti-Semite'. Let me say – a faithful Jew cannot be anti-Christian or anti-Muslim. The Ten Commandments – holy to Jews and Christians – teach respect for God and respect for man. These values do not go against each other, they go with each other. At the same time, the Jewish and democratic values of Israel go hand in hand."

 

The President added, "I am proud that Israel protects the freedom of worship and expression for everyone, of every faith. It is not enough for us to only be a safe home for Christians. We want the community to prosper, and play a part in Israeli society."

 

He concluded by wishing the Christian communities a joyful festive season, and said, "Jerusalem is the center of the world. Billions of people look to this city in hope and prayer. We all have a duty - at the beginning of the New Year and every day - to stand together and show the world that the conflict in this region is not a war about religion, it is a war against hate. We must work to build bridges between our communities, in the Holy Land and around the world. We must build dialogue, and show that people with different beliefs can live side by side, and even together; in schools and universities, in the workplace, in parliament, and even on the soccer field. This has been my mission as President, and it is a task which lies before all of us. This house, as the house of all the Israeli people, is your house too - my door is always open."

 

In response, representing the Church heads, Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem His Beatitude Theophilos III said, "In this festive season, we greet you Mr. President, and wish to express our appreciation for the strong stand you have continued to take in demonstrating respect for all religions, and your condemnation of violence from whatever side it comes. We understand the importance in the region of healthy diversity of ethnic and religious traditions, with true coexistence, mutual respect, and security for all. We join you in these affirmations and condemnations. Allow us to reiterate our commitment to education based on the principles of moral values that derive from our common heritage. This is paramount to the shaping of our social fabric."

 

Photo: Mark Neiman (GPO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statue of a ram discovered near ancient church in Caesarea

 

 An impressive marble statue of a ram, an ancient Christian symbol for Jesus, was discovered on Christmas Eve during the excavation of a Byzantine-period church in Caesarea

 

An impressive marble statue of a ram was exposed near an ancient church that dates to the Byzantine period. The discovery was made last Thursday morning in an archaeological excavation the Israel Antiquities Authority http://www.antiquities.org.il/default_en.aspx is conducting in the Caesarea Harbor National Park http://www.caesarea.com/en/home/tourism-and-leisure/harbor/general-info/caesarea-harbor-national-park-map , at the initiative of the Caesarea Development Corporation.

 

In Christian art the ram is often depicted carried on the shoulders of the “Good Shepherd” (that is, Jesus, who is portrayed as the shepherd tending his flock), and sometimes the ram is situated to the left or right of Jesus. In Christianity the ram, like the lamb, represents the faithful, or Jesus himself, whose anguish and death were meant according to Christian belief to atone for original sin (the origin of the image is in John 29:1).

 

The ram appeared alongside the Greek gods Hermes and Mercury in Roman art, and it was a representation of the god Amun in Egyptian mythology.

 

According to Dr. Peter Gendelman and Mohammad Hater, directors of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "Caesarea never ceases to surprise as evidenced by this amazing statue that was discovered today. In ancient Christianity Jesus was not portrayed as a person. Instead, symbols were used, one of which was the ram. It may or may not be a coincidence, but the statue was uncovered on Christmas Eve. The statue that we found might have been part of the decoration of a Byzantine church from the sixth–seventh centuries CE at Caesarea. By the same token it could also be earlier, from the Roman period, and was incorporated in secondary use in the church structure”.

 

The marble statue discovered in Caesarea. Photo: Vered Sarig, The Caesarea Development Corporation

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas & New Year greetings from www.diplomacy.co.il

 

To honored members of the Israel Diplomatic corps and embassy staff,
members of the Government Offices, Cultural, Commercial and industrial community in Israel and to
all our www.diplomacy.co.il & Diplomacy-PR friends:

 

As 2016 approaches, we would like to extend our very warmest and best
wishes to you all for a joyous Christmas and holiday season and a
happy and peaceful New Year.

 

 

Silvia Golan , Daniel Schwarz, Jonathan Danilowitz, & all the staff of www.diplomacy.co.il

 

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Diplomacy Israel Community

 

 

 

 

 

TENS OF THOUSANDS ARE EXPECTED TO VISIT ISRAEL DURING THE CHRISTMAS PERIOD

 

The Tourism Ministry to provide free shuttle transport between Jerusalem and Bethlehem for Christmas Mass celebrations and to support Christmas festivities in Nazareth * Tourism Minister to host pre-Christmas reception on 21/12/15 for Church leaders in Jerusalem

 

Tourism Minister Yariv Levin: "I welcome the thousands of visitors who are expected to arrive in Israel for the Christmas holiday. We are doing our utmost to offer assistance to each and every one and welcome them. The ministry invests significantly throughout the year in the conservation and upgrading of Christian sites in order to ensure that every Christian can visit the sites that are sacred for him. We invite you to visit these sites and enjoy a powerful religious and spiritual experience."

 

Jerusalem, December 17, 2015 - The Tourism Ministry is working to welcome the tens of thousands of visitors expected to arrive in Israel for the Christmas period. From 15:00 on Christmas Eve through to 03:00 on Christmas Day, the Ministry of Tourism will offer free shuttle transportation, helping pilgrims travelling between Jerusalem and Bethlehem. Buses will leave every 30 minutes on the hour and half hour from the bus stop near the Carta Parking lot (opposite Jaffa Gate and near to the Mamilla Boulevard). The bus will also stop near the entrance to the Mar Elias Monastery, and at the Rosmarin junction, before continuing via Rachel's Crossing to Bethlehem - and then back again. Representatives from the Ministry of Tourism will welcome tourists and pilgrims at Rachel’s Crossing with sweets in the spirit of the holiday. The ministry will also provide a firework display during the Christmas parade in Nazareth.

 

EVENTS AND FESTIVITIES IN JERUSALEM AND NAZARETH

 

21 December 2015

Tourism Minister Yariv Levin will host the traditional pre-Christmas reception for leaders of the Christian communities and churches in Israel at the Shimshon Center, Beit Shmuel in Jerusalem at 11:00. Also participating in the reception alongside ambassadors and Christian leaders will be the Director-General of the Tourism Ministry Amir Halevi, and representatives of the Church, government and private bodies involved in promoting Christian tourism to the Holy Land. Among the Church leaders attending the reception: His Beatitude Greek Orthodox Patriarch Theophilus III, His Eminence Vatican Ambassador Giuseppe Lazzarotto and the Custos of the Holy Land His Paternity Pierbattista Pizzaballa. The minister will send season’s greetings for Christmas to the Christian communities and invite the faithful around the world to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

 

24 December 2015

On Christmas Eve, 24.12.15, the traditional parade of thousands of local youth, together with the leaders of the Christian communities, will pass through Nazareth from 15:00. The parade ends at the plaza in front of the Basilica with a firework display, sponsored by the Tourism Ministry, to announce the opening of the festive Christmas celebrations (17:30). Christmas Mass will be celebrated in the Basilica of the Annunciation at 19:00.

 

In recent years, the Tourism Ministry has invested close to NIS 100 million in developing and maintaining the infrastructure of Christian sites, in order to enrich the pilgrim's spiritual experience. These sites include, among others, the baptism site at Qasr el Yahud near the Dead Sea, Mount Zion and Ein Karem in Jerusalem and the Gospel Trail in the Galilee. Other projects include, among others, the boardwalk from Tiberias to Capernaum, Korazim and Mount Precipice.

 

The Papal visit to Israel in May 2014 brought thousands of tourists and pilgrims to Israel and, following the visit, hundreds of thousands more tourists who traveled to the Holy Land as a result. The Tourism Ministry invested about NIS2.5 million around the visit in marketing to leverage the visit of the Pope.

 

The ministry runs dedicated websites and facebook pages for the Catholic and Evangelical communities.

 

www.holyland-pilgrimage.org  (the Tourism Ministry’s dedicated site for Catholic pilgrims, available in English, Spanish, French, Italian, German, Polish and Portuguese).


http://www.goisrael.com/Evng (the Tourism Ministry’s dedicated site for Evangelical Christians)

 

Christian tourism:

54% of the 2.9 million tourist entries (those staying at least one night) in 2014 were Christians. Of these, 39% were Catholic, 27% Protestants, 27% Orthodox. Among the Protestants, 74% were Evangelicals (who comprise 20% of all Christian tourists and 8% of all tourists) while 26% were from the mainstream and the Afro-American church. Among the Orthodox, 85% belong to the Russian Orthodox Church, and 15% to the Greek Orthodox and others.

 

21% of all visitors to Israel defined the purpose of their visit as pilgrimage. The vast majority of all Christian visitors visit Jerusalem, with about a third visiting Tel Aviv-Jaffa. The most visited sites by Christians (by descending order) Church of the Holy Sepulcher, the Jewish Quarter, Capernaum, Old Jaffa, Tower of David, Qumran, Yad Vashem, Beit Shean and Qasr el Yahud.

 

Information about Christmas services: Christian Information Center http://www.cicts.org/default.asp?id=353.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Israeli opening of “Moments from a Unique Relationship”, a photo exhibition commemorating 50 years of German-Israeli diplomatic relations, took place on December 2nd 2015 at the Ben-Zvi Institute, Jerusalem, which hosted the event together with the Tel Aviv Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany.

 

Opening the event and introducing the speakers and musical content, Dr. Judith Loebenstein-Witztum drew our attention to the hall in which we were seated – the Presidential Cabin, built in 1951 - where Rolf Friedemann Pauls, the first German ambassador to Israel, presented his credentials. President Yitzhak Ben-Zvi, who had assumed office in December 1952, believed the president to be a figure who should set an example of modesty, hence the pleasant, uncluttered décor of the room. Itzhak Ben-Zvi and his family lived in a wooden hut in the central Jerusalem suburb of Rechavia. The State of Israel purchased the adjacent wooden house to provide additional space for the President’s residence, providing offices for the President and his wife, Rahel Yanait. As to the cabin, with its folk-like but interesting wooden interior and cases of commemorative items, Ben-Zvi wanted it to be an environment where all Israeli would feel welcome.

 

The Ben-Zvi Institute of Yad Itzhak Ben-Zvi and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem was founded by Itzhak Ben-Zvi in 1947 for the purpose of the study of documents, manuscripts and printed material relating to the history, communal life and culture of Jewish communities from Islamic countries and in other countries of the Middle East and Asia. The institute initiates and supports research on these communities.

 

Following words of welcome from Prof. Haim Saadoun, director of the Ben-Zvi Institute, Dr. Clemens von Goetze, Germany’s 14th Ambassador to Israel spoke, expressing his thanks to the Ben-Zvi Institute for hosting the event and the exhibition. Dr. Goetze spoke of German-Israeli relations as having been initiated by Israel, of the very uniqueness of the collaboration and of it now covering many aspects and enjoying multiple achievements. He added that this uniqueness would remain.

 

With a deep connection to its research material, the Ben-Zvi Institute is the home to the Piyyut Ensemble, a group made up of people of different backgrounds performing material mostly from the North African repertoire of piyyut (the ancient collection of Jewish liturgical poems usually sung, chanted or recited in religious services.) Members of the Piyyut Ensemble of the Ben-Zvi Institute meet in search of a new choral sound that combines the traditional with the interpretive. All artists take inspiration from their own oriental backgrounds, those being mostly Moroccan. A few members (all men) of the ensemble performed two pieces in singing that was mostly in unison, the works structured but with spontaneous and solo elements. Convincing and spiritually-oriented, the artists gave emphasis to articularly sung texts, with sympathetic not-overly-obtrusive percussion accompaniments. In the second piece, oud (a plectrum-played, pear-shaped string instrument), percussion and ney (an end-blown flute commonly played in the Middle East) joined the singing, adding gentle textures and an oriental touch to the performance.

 

Giving much information on the exhibition itself, we heard Dr. Chana Schütz, curator of the exhibition and associate director and head of the research department of the Centrum Judaicum of the New Jewish Synagogue in Berlin. Dr. Chana Schütz is the daughter of Klaus Schütz (1926-2012), who was a German politician of the Social Democrat Party. He was Mayor of West Berlin from 1967-1977, President of the Bundesrat 1967-8, becoming federal Ambassador to Israel from 1977 to 1981. Chana Schütz felt she wanted to create the photographic exhibition in honor of her father. Addressing the development of this collaboration of the recent 50 years, she claimed that its progress could not have been predicted, that major problems might have caused it to unfold very differently and that its story has been “written” by individual people. She referred to Gershom Sholem’s discussion of the “myth of the German-Jewish dialogue”, in which he had claimed that the possibility of Jews overcoming their feelings to be hopeless; she also referred to an embarrassing incident with Polish-born Jewish authority in literary criticism Marcel Reich-Ranicki at the Schütz home in Jerusalem. Her own connection with this time in history bears many personal aspects: living in Jerusalem, she received her B.A. from the Hebrew University and it was in Jerusalem that she met her Texan husband-to-be.

 

The exhibition itself, Dr. Schütz explained, had come from the Centrum Judaicum, opening in May 2014, with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin making his first official visit to Germany for the occasion. First shown at the Federal Foreign Office in Berlin, it was opened by State Secretary Steinlein and the Israeli Ambassador to Germany Yaakov Hadas-Handelsman and Hermann Simon, director of the New Synagogue Berlin-Centrum Judaicum Foundation. Titled “Snapshots of a Unique Relationship”, the exhibition presents some of the highlights of the bilateral relations as of May 12th 1965, featuring photographs, information boards and film sequences to recall several significant moments of those 50 years. It focuses on the following themes: “Beginnings”, “Historical Responsibility”, “The Games Must Go On”, “Shared Values”, “Partnerships” and “Homelands”. Chosen by Dr. Schütz, all the material constitutes primary sources, most being of public domain. She expressed her gratitude to recently retired government press office photographer Moshe Milner and to the Israel Press Office for making photos available. The 52 images of the exhibition are interconnected, though not necessarily in chronological order. Visiting the exhibit, one can spend time viewing the mostly black-and white photos that bring to life so many important moments in the two countries’ recently shared half-century: first Israeli ambassador to Germany Asher Ben-Natan arriving on German shores in 1965, Ygal Alon and Willi Brandt photographed together (looking like brothers), a tense Menachem Begin shaking hands with German foreign minister Hans Dietrich Genscher in 1974, a bakery opened in Germany by a kibbutznik, a German-made submarine near Haifa in 2012, the first Israeli passport design by Hamburg-born Francesca Baruch…and much more. Dr. Chana Schütz ended her talk by referring to Israel and Germany as “mutually incompatible countries” yet bound by fundamental human values, the vital essence on which cooperation is based.

 

Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/


Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 

 Photo :copyright: Ben Zvi – Ashley Silvern

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

POLISH INSTITUTE is delighted TO INVITE TO:

 

Opening event for ‘ Tribute to Polanski’ project. The event will be held at Cinemateque Tel Aviv, on Sunday 13th of December.

 

At 8.00 p.m. opening of the exhibition of works from WIZO Art Academy ( results of a weeklong workshop with Bartosz Kosowski- poster designer),
 
 
followed by screening of the film “ Carnage” and a Q& A with R. Polanski’s  film editor, Herve de Luze, who is coming especially for this project and to receive an life time achievement award,
 
 
during Jewish Film Festival In Jerusalem.
 
 
RSVP to :  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., till Thursday 10th, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

A colourful Christmas celebration at the BIG FASHION Nazareth Mall

 

 Santa Claus, holiday decorations and a festive holiday fair creating an unforgettable Christmas experience in BIG FASHION Nazareth shopping center

 

The lights, the trees, the colours and tastes. Everything in a European style:


The Big Fashion Nazareth Mall is celebrating Christmas just like any mall in the European capitals. The mall is decorated head to toe with Christmas trees, twinkle lights, a giant snowball and many stands offering holiday gifts.

 

 

The different stores and chains of the mall, all decorated their window displays, just like in Europe with snowflakes, trees, reindeers and glitters, attracting our eyes even from afar. The mall is having a Prettiest Window contest offering a pampering reward for the staff of the shop with the most festively decorated window.


Santa Claus’s traditional tree house, all decorated with lights, has been built inside the mall as a Christmas Pop-Up Shop offering a range of products, gifts, decorations and holiday novelty. Santa himself is roaming the mall, heading parades, surprising children with presents, dancing and celebrating to holiday tunes.


In addition, a spectacular holiday scenery will be set up to demonstrate a cozy in-doors holiday feel including a wooden fireplace, wool carpet, rocking chair, decorated twinkling Christmas tree with present underneath and more.

 

There will also be a festive Christmas market at the mall, offering special holiday accessories: authentic decorations, Santa hats, special food, spices and more.

 

 

The international atmosphere created in the Nazareth BIG FASHION Mall during the holiday is inseparable from the celebrations taking place throughout the city. The mall offers its shoppers a full holiday experience identical to those offered in shopping malls around the world.


BIG FASHION Nazareth Mall of the BIG Shopping Center Group is a first of its kind life style center in Israel characterized with a wide range of shops of the best international brands, empathizing fashion, cosmetics, jewelry and coffee shops. The center is built as an avenue of open streets fitting in to the environment and local scenery, turning the center in to a unique space of international atmosphere giving an experience of shopping in an urban street with the highest level of design.

 

Nazareth Big Fashion’s Facebook page is quickly and easily updated with all the hottest news from the mall- sales, brands, fashion trends, new collections and different holiday activities and events taking place at the mall during Christmas.

 

Big Fashion Nazareth Mall Christmas celebrations will start on November 10th

 

***
Join BIG’s Facebook page for live feeds on events, sales and other surprises waiting for you at BIG shopping centers around the country!

 

https://www.facebook.com/BIGCENTERISRAEL

 

 

Photos Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Israel Contemporary Players opened its 25th “Discoveries” season

 

The Israel Contemporary Players opened its 25th “Discoveries” season with a representative selection of the ensemble’s wide range of repertoire, from Stravinsky’s “Ragtime”, to music of Ligeti, to folk-flavored music, to the premiering of a work by Eitan Steinberg, with music from England, Europe and Israel. The concert was conducted by Professor Zsolt Nagy (b. Gyula Hungary, 1957), who has served as chief conductor and artistic adviser to the ICP since 1999. A collaboration of The Voice of Music IBA Israeli radio and the Jerusalem Music Centre Mishkenot Sha’ananim, with the support of the Ministry of Culture and the Tel Aviv-Jaffa Municipality, the series is under the artistic direction of Dan Yuhas and Zmira Lutzky. This writer attended the concert on November 1st 2015 at the Jerusalem Music Centre.

 

The program opened with “Pierrot on the Stage of Desire” (1998) by British conductor and composer Roger Redgate (b.1958), a work for flute, clarinet, violin, percussion and piano, written in the “New Complexity” style of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. As the title infers, the piece focuses on the character of the dreamy, naïve clown Pierrot and his sadly unrequited love for Columbine. In three miniature but evocative and richly designed movements, the players presented the opening movement’s feisty, witty character in crisp, articulate gestures, the middle movement more introspective than the two outer movements. With fine clarinet playing on the part of Danny Erdman, the sextet’s articulate and skillful performance offered much to fire the listener’s imagination, as the agitated third movement finally dissipated into nowhere. Redgate, who has worked in the fields of jazz, improvised music and performance art, writes music for film and television and writes about music. In 1999, he collaborated with the New York-based experimental rock band GAWK.

 

Then to what Zmira Lutzky referred to as a significant work in the development of modern chamber music – György Ligeti’s Chamber Concerto. Composed 1969-1970, it is scored for flute, clarinet (doubling bass clarinet), horn, trombone, harpsichord (doubling Hammond organ), piano (doubling celesta) and solo strings. As to its format, it is not a concerto in the conventional sense but “all 13 players are virtuoso soloists and all are treated as equals”, in the composer’s words. This being the case, the Israel Contemporary Players’ reading of it was beguiling and not just for its virtuosic performance. Nagy brought his ensemble together in articulate and wonderfully precise playing of the work’s extraordinary textures and different techniques, rendering it transparent, accessible and exciting. In its four contrasting movements, concluding with a wild, whirring series of rapid cadences, the work reminds the listener that this major classical work, in its inventive, playful, poetic and communicative utterance, still has much to say to today’s audiences.

 

We then heard the Israeli premiere of “Cosmic Progressions in the Heart II” for 10 instruments by Israeli composer Eitan Steinberg (b. 1955), one of today’s prominent Israeli composers. “Cosmic Progressions in the Heart II” was commissioned and premiered in 2011 by the El Perro Andaluz Ensemble (Dresden, Germany.) It is the second of three pieces, each the result of a process of change, referred to by Steinberg as non-linear change, with the composer interested in examining what might constitute development or a lack thereof in the pieces. Scored for orchestra, “Cosmic Progressions in the Heart I” was premiered by the Israel Camerata Jerusalem in 2008. “Cosmic Progressions in the Heart III” for symphony orchestra was premiered in 2013 by the Tbilisi Symphony, Georgia, conducted by Vakhtang Kakhidze. Referring to the pieces and their title, Steinberg spoke of the cosmos and the heart as what we all possess, that what we do has impact on the cosmos, with the cosmos also influencing our actions. When composing the work, what was echoing in the composer’s mind was that Albert Einstein had claimed that past and present are only directions like left and right, forward and backwards. Over recent years, as Steinberg has returned to the work to change parts here and there, creating new versions, it has gone through its own natural processes, hence its three versions. “Cosmic Progressions in the Heart II”, as performed at the ICP concert, is scored for strings, flute, clarinet, percussion, accordion and piano. A richly wrought canvas comprising tiny fragments as well as intense drawn-out sounds, a sprinkling of tonal references, dancelike moments, the use of insistent ostinato, a nostalgic folk-type melody played on accordion, Steinberg’s orchestration and palette of timbres are both sophisticated and attractive, personal and emotional, making for an exhilarating listening experience.

 

Igor Stravinsky’s “Ragtime” (1918), one of the composer’s “essays in jazz portraiture”, is scored for flute, clarinet, 2 horns, trombone, bass drum, snare drum, side drum, cymbals, 2 violins, viola, double bass and cimbalom. In 1915, Swiss conductor Ernest Ansermet took Stravinsky to hear Aladar Racz playing the Hungarian cimbalom - a hammered dulcimer from Eastern Europe, introduced into Hungary by the Roma (Gypsy) people - at a bar in Geneva. Stravinsky, fascinated by the trapezoid shape of the instrument and its rich timbre, decided to buy one; he and Racz found an elderly Hungarian gypsy with one for sale. The composer first used it to produce raucous animal effects in his chamber opera-ballet “Renard”, later using it wherever possible. Assuming an almost solo role in “Ragtime” (an extension of the dance in “A Soldier’s Tale”), Stravinsky used the cimbalom to imitate the sound of a honky-tonk piano. Guest artist at this ICP concert, Hungarian composer, improviser, jazz musician and master of the cimbalom Miklós Lukács (b.1977), on his first visit to Israel, joined Nagy and the ensemble in a performance that was jaunty, clean, pithy, bristling with energy and tinged with Stravinsky’s brand of cynicism, the uncommonly grainy character of the cimbalom infusing a unique voice into the texture.

 

The program concluded with “Da Capo” (2003-2004) for cimbalom (or marimba) and ensemble by Hungarian conductor and composer Peter Eötvös (b.1944), with Miklós Lukács performing the cimbalom part on the Israel Contemporary Players’ instrument (tuned chromatically). In an interview with Tünde Szitha appearing in the blog of Universal Music Publishing Classical in May of 2014, Eötvös spoke of the work’s title as relating to the structure of the work, to the constant process of starting afresh. “The music begins and reaches a certain point, but, before it is completed, it starts again…in a different way…nine times.” Introducing fragments of themes from Mozart archives as initial ideas, these launch a creative process transforming them into Eötvös’ own music. Referring to it as his “newest and oldest” work, the composer suggests that the piece could be subtitled “Reading Mozart”, but speaks of its scoring as being very different from Mozart’s orchestration, considering the fact that some of the instruments he uses did not exist in Mozart’s time. The essential difference lies in the variety of percussion instruments, not to speak of the instrument in the solo role. The latter was inspired by Miklós Lukács’ virtuoso playing, which, as we heard, was no understatement. In his dazzling performance, underlining the composer’s complex polyphonic writing, Lukács joins the ICP, serving as soloist and ensemble player as Eötvös runs the listener through the unpredictable course of “Da Capo”, its busy, split-character canvas juxtaposing velvety, touching Mozart gestures with blatant, fiery moments of atonality, the use of ostinati, some references to jazz and devil-may-care energy. For his encore, Miklós Lukács played his own composition “After Dark”, a virtuosic and folk-music-inspired piece, this time playing the cimbalom with his hands rather than with hammers.

 

In yet another evening of polished, dedicated and finely detailed performance, Maestro Nagy and members of the Israel Contemporary Players opened the new concert season with an outstanding evening of music.

 

Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/


Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 Eitan Steinberg photo by Eytan Shouker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24 November 2015, Tel Aviv, State of Israel – "Rescue in the Philippines: Refuge from the Holocaust", a film documenting the story of 1,300 Jews fleeing the Holocaust and finding a safe haven in the Philippines, was screened for the first time in Israel on 24 November 2015 at the Yad Vashem.

 

The one-hour documentary recounts how President Manuel L. Quezon, the five Frieder brothers Philip, Henry, Alex, Morris, and Herbert, then US High Commissioner to the Philippines Paul McNutt, and then Army Colonel Dwight Eisenhower - men of different backgrounds, yet united by their moral courage to help others in need - helped 1,300 Jews escape the Nazis and immigrate to the Philippines. At a time when many countries shut their doors or circumstances made it desperately hard for Jews to escape with their lives, these men embarked on a plan of rescue and settlement in the Philippines, risking their reputations and careers, simply because they believed it was the right thing to do.

 

President Quezon ordered an "Open Door Policy" initially allowing up to 10,000 European Jews to enter the Philippines. He went further by donating a land he owned in Marikina (outside Manila) for settlement and lobbying more land for Jewish refugees in Mindanao. As the Philippines was then a Commonwealth Government subject to US policies on visas, High Commissioner McNutt took on the task of convincing the US to keep the Philippine borders open and issue thousands of working visas for Jews. The Frieder brothers worked in raising funds to transport Jewish refugees to Manila, providing them jobs in the brothers' cigar factory, and building housing and schools for their children.

 

The story of the rescue is told through a series of interviews and interwoven tales from surviving refugees, historians, relatives, and friends of these men who interestingly came up with the plan of rescuing Jews over poker games.

 

Not many Filipinos and Israelis know about the rescue story in the Philippines. As such, Yad Vashem Chairman Avner Shalev and Philippine Ambassador to Israel Neal Imperial collaborated to premiere the film in Israel on Tuesday to promote awareness among Filipinos and Israelis of this beautiful, yet little-known part of their history.

 

During the program, Philippine Ambassador to Israel Neal Imperial said that the event was purposely held in November to coincide with the anniversary month of the "Kristallnacht" (Night of Broken Glass) and show that 77 years ago the Filipinos were in solidarity with the European Jews, expressing outrage at the racism and inhumanity of the Nazis and their sympathizers through a large indignation rally held in Manila in 1938, when other countries chose to be silent.

 

Senior Assistant to the Yad Vashem Chairman Mr. Yossi Gevir said that while the horrific attempts to annihilate Jews were the core of the Holocaust narrative and remembrance, the Yad Vashem also continues to be inspired and be empowered by other stories such as the rescue in the Philippines and the vision and behavior of the men behind it who chose to uphold their principles and take action during the darkest of times, under the most difficult circumstances and even as many countries remained unconcerned. The Yad Vashem is committed to recall and focus on aspects of the Holocaust that provide inspiration, strength and hope and to create and build anew from these. It salutes these people and remembers them with admiration and seeks to follow their footsteps, in the footsteps of their integrity and loyalty to their principles.

 

Co-producer of the film Dr. Barbara Sasser said that the "Rescue in the Philippines" honors these rescuers for their moral courage and it is hoped that the documentary will inspire others to do the same. She added that in making the film, she and the people behind it also honor the Philippines for accepting Jews when few other countries did. She also expressed hope that the Yad Vashem and the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. would find a way to include the Philippines in their list of rescuing nations.

 

Ambassador Imperial speaks about President Quezon's moral courage to help Jewish refugees during the premiere screening.

 

The screening also included a lecture on the topic: "Hoping to be a Refugee: Jewish Migration Efforts during the Holocaust" by Dr. David Silberklang, Senior Historian of Yad Vashem's International Institute for Holocaust Research and Editor of Yad Vashem Studies. Dr. Silberklang underscored the importance of the Philippines' efforts to help save Jews by setting the rescue against the backdrop of other countries' failure to respond or their indifference to the plight of Jews during the Holocaust. The Philippines may have saved only 1,300 Jews - a number so small when compared with other countries and a number which could have reached up to 10,000 or perhaps more if not for the outbreak of war - but the fact that the country willingly accepted them and invited them to stay and be part of its economic development is what makes the rescue efforts a unique and special case. He ended the talk by saying that at a time when most countries shut their doors, were hesitant or even silent and when other circumstances made escape so difficult and out of reach, the Jewish refugees who found a home in the Philippines were among the few lucky ones.--END--

 

 

 

 

 

 

Romanian participation at the international conference "And there confound their language - Journey between Foreign Languages in Israeli Literature", November 24-25, 2015, Bar Ilan University

 

The Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv, in collaboration with the Department of Literature of the Jewish People – Bar Ilan University, invite you to the international conference "And there confound their language - Journey between Foreign Languages in Israeli Literature", which will take place on November 24th and 25th, 2015 at the Beck Auditorium of the Bar Ilan University.

 

With the support of the Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv, Dr. Camelia Crăciun will be present at the conference with the lecture, in English, ”Connecting Israel and Romania: The Romanian Cultural Circle of Jerusalem” on November 24th, 2015 at 15:30.

 

The entrance to the conference will be free and the lectures will be delivered in English and Hebrew with translation.

 

The complete program of the event can be found in the annex.

 

For two decades, the Romanian Cultural Circle of Jerusalem, conducted by Leon Volovici and Costel Safirman, generated a milieu in which Romanian language Israeli writers, journalists and artists could exchange ideas, projects and latest publications and subject them to public debate. The current presentation aims at presenting the major debates sparked by these periodical and highly successful events starting from the three-volume series of transcribed “Jerusalem meetings”: Întâlniri la Ierusalim, Noi întâlniri la Ierusalim and O lume văzută de la Ierusalim. The presentation analyzes the debates in their cultural and linguistic milieu, Romanian-language audience in Israel, the major issues approached and their treatment in a space at the convergence between two cultures, Romanian and Israeli.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEE UKRAINE  Docudays UA is going to the international tour.  First stop is Tel Aviv on November 26-28, 2015.

 

Docudays UA together with cinema-project MUSEON invites you to the screenings of Ukrainian documentary films in Tel Aviv (Israel). In the days of information wars people are reasonably suffering from information hunger. To find reliability and true meanings, for better understanding we try to get inside a core of each phenomena, and isn’t this a point of actual documentaries?

 

Ten films carefully selected by the DOCUDAYS UA festival’s curators will be shown on November 26-28, 2015. All of them speak different cinematographic languages, but tell us stories about one global theme which is Ukraine: from the fiery barricades on the Maidan square (All Things Ablaze by Alexander Techinsky, Alexey Solodunov, Dmitry Stoykov) to the deliberately idyllic existence of Carpathians’ shepherds (Living Fife by Ostap Kostyuk), and from a wild miner’s festivities (The Miner’s Day by Gael Mocaer) to a life almost in the dark, when each passing day is already a heroic deed (Crepuscule by Valentin Vasyanovich). The festival of the best Ukrainian documentary films will be opening with the restored version of the avant-garde masterpiece The Eleventh Year (1928) by Dziga Vertov, which incorporates new soundtrack by contemporary Ukrainian composer Anton Baibakov.

 

The guests from Kyiv will come to Tel Aviv to introduce film program to Israeli audience: film directors Alexander Techinsky and Ostap Kostyuk, the DOCUDAYS UA Festival’s program coordinator Victoria Leschenko.

 

This program is a pilot edition of the project named «See Ukraine: Docudays UA on tour». It is travelling festival of the documentaries about Ukraine, which allows to people worldwide to explore the country through cinema and photography, and also to communicate with Ukrainian filmmakers, photographers, civil activists and journalists, who will try to provide additional contexts to the events shown in the films, and tell us about what happens in the country nowadays.

 

MUSEON project is a wandering cinema theater based in Israel. It aims to refresh forgotten masterpieces and present newest cinematic trends in various genres: cine-documents, cinemusic, movies of young & student filmmakers, world film festivals, secret screenings, lectures, workshops, discussions and cine-parties.

 

The films will be screened with English subtitles.

The workshop and Q&A will be translated to Hebrew.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1640665206199255/

 

 

 

 

 

Notes from from the October 2015 Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival

 

“Sacred Service – Ernest Bloch” was the title given to a concert on October 3rd 2015 at the 48th Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival. Taking place in the Church of Our Lady of the Ark of the Covenant, Kiryat Ye’arim, 10 kilometers west of Jerusalem, the concert featured the Chamber Choir of the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, conducted by its musical director Prof. Stanley Sperber, with alto Avital Dery as soloist in the Bloch work.

 

Prior to the performance of Bloch’s “Sacred Service”, the choir sang a number of short pieces representing a number of Israel’s finest composers, opening with some of the choir’s repertoire of Sabbath songs: Gil Aldema’s (1928-2014) arrangement of two traditional Sabbath songs “Shalom Aleichem” (Peace be upon you), “Tzur Mishelo” (The Lord, our rock, whose food we have eaten) and Yehezkel Braun’s arrangement of Mordechai Zeira’s (1905-1968) “L’cha dodi” (Come, my beloved, to meet the bride). Lining both side aisles of the church, the singers welcomed festival-goers with singing that was unforced, clean, direct and so rewarding. They captured the mystery and exotic flavor of Oedoen Partos’ (1907-1977) setting of the Sephardic traditional melody “HaMavdil” (The One who separates), traditionally sung at the conclusion of the Sabbath. In Yehezkel Braun’s arrangement of the oriental melody to the medieval poetic text “Dror Yikra” (He will proclaim freedom) the singers gave expression to the piece’s antiphonal style, concluding it with a spirited dance, the darbuka drum joining the dance.

 

As a young musician, Swiss composer Ernest Bloch (1880-1959) took the decision to write “Jewish rhapsodies for orchestra, Jewish poems, dances, mostly, poems for voice”. This he did. It was during his time as director of the San Francisco Conservatory (1925-1930) that he befriended Cantor Reuben Rinder of the Temple Emanuel Reform Congregation, resulting in the commission to write “Avodath Hakodesh” (Sacred Service) for baritone, chorus and orchestra (or piano or organ). In preparation for the task, Bloch spent a year studying synagogue music and the Hebrew texts used for Saturday morning services, subsequently composing the work over three years on his return to Switzerland in the early 1930s. The work consists of five sections, breaking down into 26 pieces. In the Abu Gosh Festival performance we heard the role of cantor sung by alto Avital Dery, with Boris Zobin playing the organ. In the choir and soloist’s alternating and interweaving throughout many of the movements, the Jerusalem Academy Chamber Choir and Dery struck a fine balance, with all choral strands articulate musically and diction-wise. Maestro Sperber and his singers showed the listener through the work’s agenda, from drama and tension to brighter optimism, from meditation to intense choral exclamation, traversing strategically placed and thought-provoking dissonances to reach the final tranquility of the major-infused Benediction. Sperber’s direction was rich in sensitive shaping of phrases as it held the work’s tension throughout, giving meaning and immediacy to transitions from section to section in Bloch’s conglomerate process, to that of the service itself and to the work’s underlying message of both strength and fragility. In singing that was secure, articulate and expressive, the choir highlighted the beauty and subtleties of Bloch’s choral writing. At ease and addressing her audience, Avital Dery’s singing was profound, engaging, intelligent and balanced, her large, richly-timbred and mellow voice finding its way with ease through the text and to all corners of the church. Boris Zobin’s organ-playing added both presence and to the spiritual eloquence of the piece. Altogether, this was an outstanding and moving performance of the work that Bloch himself referred to as a “cosmic poem…a dream of stars, of forces…amidst the rocks and forests in the great silence…”

 

◊◊◊◊◊◊

David Sebba


Also taking place at the Kiryat Ye’arim Church on October 3rd was “Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves” works by Pergolesi and Puccini, performed by members of the Israeli Opera’s Meitar Opera Studio with its musical director David Sebba at the piano. The Meitar Opera Studio, a practical study and performance program for young opera singers who have completed studies at music academies, provides the singers with a stepping stone into a full-fledged opera career.

 

Following four movements from Giovanni Battista Pergolesi’s “Magnificat”, the program consisted mostly of solos, offering the audience the opportunity to hear several budding young opera singers, first in works of Pergolesi: mezzo-soprano Anat Czarny in her rich, fresh and effortlessly musical singing of the charming song warning of love’s pitfalls (attributed to Pergolesi) “Se tu m’ami” (If you love me), soprano Tal Ganor’s exciting, dramatic and highly operatic approach in “Tu me da me divide” (You rend me from myself), in which Aristea laments the cruelty of her lover from Act 2 of “L’Olimpiade”, and soprano Galina Khlyzova’s theatrical and well contrasted performance of “Stizzoso mio stizzoso” (Irascible, my irascible) from “La serva padrona” (The Maid as Mistress). In “Lo conosco” from the same opera, Tal Ganor and baritone Yair Polishook highlighted the contrasts between Serpina’s insistant “si, si, si” and Uberto’s equally obstinate “no, no, no” in true opera buffa whimsy. The Pergolesi section of the concert ended with soprano Tali Ketzeff’s rich, focused, devotional and highly expressive singing of one of the composer’s two “Salve Regina” settings, music composed during the suffering of Pergolesi’s final months.

 

The connection between Pergolesi and Giacomo Puccini (two Italian composers, but therein ends the resemblance) was made via the same Marian hymn text – “Salve Regina”. (Puccini was the fourth generation of a family of church musicians, playing the church organ, his early forays into composition being with sacred works.) Following soprano Nofar Jacobi’s sensitive and involved presentation of Puccini’s “Salve Regina”, we heard Yair Polishook’s richly shaped and expressive performance of the “Crucifixus” from Puccini’s “Messa di Gloria”. And then to Puccini’s operatic repertoire: soprano Efrat Vulfsons and tenor Osher Sebbag’s communicative and furtively tender presentation of the duet between Rodolfo and Mimi “O soave fanciulla” (O sweet little lady) from “La Bohème” , soprano Irene Alhazov’s appealing singing of “Dondo lieta” (Whence happy leaving) Mimi’s fond farewell to Rodolfo from the same opera, soprano Tali Ketzef’s convincing and finely controlled rendition of “Chi il bel sogno” (Who could Doretta’s beautiful dream ever guess?) from “La Rondine”, Efrat Vulfsons’ convincing performance of the tragic, grieving mood piece “Senza mamma” (Without mama) from “Suor Angelica” and, finally, Osher Sebbag’s introspective and commanding performance of “Torna ai felici di” (Return to the happy days) from the opera-ballet “Le Villi”, his substantial, pleasing vocal timbre and personality highlighting the aria’s dramatic content.

 

The concert concluded with three much loved vocal pieces sung as ensembles: two Neapolitan songs - Ernesto de Curtis’ 1902 “Torna a Surriento” (Come Back to Sorrento) and Turco and Denza’s “Funiculì funiculà”, composed in 1880 to commemorate the opening of the first cable car on Mount Vesuvius, but with its text changed here to wish listeners a happy New Year; and finally “Va pensiero” (Fly thought, on wings of gold) – “Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves” from Verdi’s” Nabucco” in a performance that was tastefully blended and rich in color. Throughout the program, Sebba’s spirited piano accompaniments gave a wealth of color and support to his singers.

 

Adding to the audience’s enjoyment of the program is the fact that Israel is producing excellent opera singers. Conductor-in-residence of the Ra’anana Symphonette Orchestra, senior lecturer at the Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance, singer, composer and conductor, accompanist and vocal coach Maestro David Sebba directs opera concerts for the Israeli Opera, also serving as translator for many of the Israeli Opera’s community productions.

 

◊◊◊◊◊◊

Myrna Herzog

A major event of the 2015 October Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival was the Israeli premiere of Michelangelo Falvetti’s “Il Diluvio Universale” (The Great Flood) to a libretto of Vincenzo Giattini. The performance took place October 5th in the Kiryat Ye’arim Church. Performing the work were singers and instrumentalists of Ensemble PHOENIX conducted by the ensemble’s founder and musical director Myrna Herzog. Putting the production together, Herzog worked from a transcription made by the Messina musicologist Fabrizio Longo, to whom she is indebted.

 

Sicilian composer Michelangelo Falvetti (1642-1695) was born in Calabria but spent most of his life in Sicily, enjoying a prestigious career in Messina, where he became maestro di cappella; that is where the “Dialogue for five voices and five instruments” (as he subtitled “Il Diluvio Universale”), was first performed in 1682. Whether or not this work – falling not quite into categories of oratorio or sacred opera – was influenced by Messina’s history, in particular by its suffering from- and rebellion against Spanish rule, with the Noah’s Flood story reflecting God’s punishing the world for its disobedience and corruption, is unclear. What is clear is that the powerful story of the Great Flood offers and inspires theatrical potential and variety, as would have Messina itself, a city ravaged by earthquakes and tidal waves and it remains flooded till today. For starters, “Il Diluvio Universale” is a work of exceptionally fine quality, its originality and inventiveness fired with fine melodic, harmonic and polyphonic writing. And Falvetti has no compunctions about springing a few surprises on the listener, with his occasional unconventional gestures. We meet personifications of Divine Justice (Alon Harari), Human Nature (Einat Aronstein), Water (Claire Meghnagi), Fire (Oshri Segev), Land (Guy Pelc) and Death (Alon Harari). Baritone Guy Pelc, in his portrayal of God, was authoritative, secure and dramatic, some of the role’s vocal range dipping a trifle too low for his voice at this stage...in which case, the players might have adjusted their volume better to suit his singing. The tender and anguished duets of Noah (Oshri Segev) and his wife (Claire Meghnagi), providing a touching human element to a play of super powers, also tended to vary in musical balance. Meghnagi, very much at home on the opera/oratorio stage, handled the virtuosic moments with natural ease and charm, soaring into her high register with agility. Served well by his stable and richly-timbred tenor voice, Oshri Segev shaped vocal lines with artistry and highlighted the emotions written into the text. Soprano Einat Aronstein gave a skillful and informed performance, presenting the subtleties of the Baroque style of a challenging text. As Divine Justice, countertenor Alon Harari brought out the moods and turns of the text, his luxuriant voice, evenly pleasing in all registers. As to his portrayal of “Death”, Harari, a part cut out for him, Harari indulged in the role of the demonic character with alacrity and with the wink of an eye, his enjoyment and spontaneity providing comic relief…and the audience loved it!

 

Much of the strength of the performance must be attributed to Dr. Myrna Herzog’s deep and genuine enquiry into the score to produce a performance faithful to Italian music of the mid-Baroque and elegant in its restraint. With a strong background in theatre, she talks of the need to understand the text (translated into Hebrew for the program by her and Uri Dror) both in its linguistic detail and its theatrical potential. What was especially beautiful throughout the performance was the variety of orchestration she chose, each instrumental scoring offering a new set of timbres. Herzog sees scoring as a parallel to lighting effects in theatre. And Falvetti’s writing presents interesting effects – sweeping winds, the deluge itself, beginning with individual raindrops and building up, re-emergence of the sun and some surprising, dramatic halts at strategic moments. We were also presented with a rich array of dances. The choruses were sung with warmth and beautifully shaped, commenting and updating the listener on developments in the storyline and its changing emotional climate. Herzog had a group of very fine Baroque players at hand, reading into visual aspects and reflecting on the plot: violinists Noam Schuss and Ralph Allen, bassoonist Alexander Fine, cornetto- and recorder player Alma Meyer, viol players Tal Arbel and Sonja Navot, Myrna Herzog – Baroque ‘cello, Aviad Stier-organ, Yehuda (Hudi) Itzhak Halevy on the violone (his first performance on this instrument), Liron Rinot on sackbut, guitarist Ian Aylon and percussionist Nadav Gaiman, whose understated use of instruments was both lifelike and fanciful. Herzog herself alternated between conducting from the podium and playing in the ensemble. A musicologist with energy, curiosity and a fastidious bent, Dr. Myrna Herzog has once again thrilled festival audiences, introducing them to a little-known and rare Baroque treasure that recounts a well-known Bible story with freshness and magic.

 

 About Pamela Hickman :

 Born in Australia;in Israel since 1968.Studied at Melbourne University(BA Languages,Music,Education),the Jerusalem Academy of Music(Theory,Composition),New York University(Music education.)

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/
Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

Myrna Herzog, photo by Eliahu Feldman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jazz concerts - Jaffa Jazz international festival

 

Jaffa Jazz International Jazz Festival, curated by Amikam Kimelman at Mander Cultural Center in Tel Aviv-Yaffo, on 8, 9, 10 October

 


Trumpet Player Emil Bizga at JaffaJazz International Festival  Mandel Cultural Center, 8-10 October 2015

 

The Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv proudly supports the presence of jazz trumpet player Emil Bizga at Jaffa Jazz International Festival that will take place at Mandel Cultural Center between the 8th and the 10th of October 2015.


Musicians performing in the Festival: Emil Bizga (trumpet, Romania), Gyárfás István (guitar, Hungary), Iñaki Sandoval (piano, Spain), Jan de Hass (drums, Belgium), Heinrich von Kalnein (saxophone and flute, Austria), Attila Korb (trombone, Ungaria), Jeff Berlin (bass, USA) Deborah J. Carter (voic, USA) as well as over 30 musicians from Israel: Yaron Gotfried, Gilad Dobretski, Eyal Ganor, Ofer Ganor, Shay Zalman, Amikam Kimelman, Arie Welnitz, Dvora Benassouli, Gregory Rivkin, Simon Starr, Miki Varshai and others.


The Festival program is dedicated to international jazz classics, comprising music composed and performed by well known international jazz stars. Concerts venue: Mandel Cultural Center (Tel Aviv – Yafo, 1 Hatkooma St.)


Tickets and more information: tel. 03-5733001, 1700-5000-39

 

http://www.hotjazz.co.il/%D7%A4%D7%A1%D7%98%D7%99%D7%91%D7%9C-%D7%99%D7%A4%D7%95-%D7%92%D7%90%D7%96-2/


Concerts schedule:
• Tribute to Philly Joe Jonas - Thursday, 08.10.2015, 20:30 hrs
• Tribute to Jack Bruce - Thursday, 08.10.2015, 22:30 hrs
• Tribute to Wes Montgomery - Friday, 09.10.2015, 15:00 hrs
• Tribute to Frank Roselino - Friday, 09.10.2015, 17:30 hrs
• Tribute to Joe Henderson - Friday, 09.10.2015, 20:30 hrs


• Jazz Unites People - Friday, 09.10.2015, 22:30 hrs
• Tribute to Cannonball Adderley - Saturday, 10.10.2015, 15:00 hrs
• Tribute to Chet Baker – Saturday, 10.10.2015, 17:00 (SOLD OUT) hrs
• Tribute to Bill Evans – Saturday, 10.10.2015, 20:30 (SOLD OUT) hrs
• Tribute to Carmen McCarry - Saturday, 10.10.2015, 22:30 hrs


The Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv warmly thanks to the musician Amikam Kimelman for initiating the Festival and for promoting the Romanian musician.


The page of the event: www.icr.ro/jaffajazz2015en.

 

Bios- International Guests

Iñaki Sandoval- piano, Spain
One of Spain's most renowned pianists.
Performed with jazz greats Eddie Gomez, Bob Mintzer, Billie hart, Marvin Stam and more.
Inaki's sound and approach are influenced by Maurice Ravel, Bill Evans and Keith Jarret and combines both softness and high energy.
From the media:
“Iñaki Sandoval’s jazz is sophisticated and exquisite, elegant and serene. His music is like a creation of Haute Couture”.
Pere Pons, JAÇ Magazine

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rA2XXo2Dh1I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Tw-ta3EPHQ


Emil Bizga- Trumpet, Rumania
Trumpet virtuoso Emil Bizga is active both in the USA and Europe.
Owns a master degree in music from the Malmo University, Sweden and a doctorate from Rutgers University, NJ. Studied with Wynton Marsalis and performed in numerous festivals and concerts throughout the world, such as Poland, Greece, Austria and Germany, including the prestigious Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland. Performed with jazz greats Jimmy Cobb, Paquito de Rivera and Ray Charles. Emil also performs regularly with the renowned French/Rumanian composer Vladimir Cosma and plays both jazz and classical music


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z1-NJUZm5Z4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHvZUZg00yQ

 

Gyárfás István – Guitar, Hungary
One of Hungary's leading guitar players. Music director of the Euro Jazz Express Jazz Festival. Regular member of the Budapest Jazz orchestra and a band leader of his own.
Istvan performs extensively throughout Europe and Hungary in festivals and concerts and participated in over than 30 jazz album both as a band leader and as a sideman.
Played with jazz greats Scott Hamilton, Tony Lakatos, Ernie Wilkins, Ed Tigpen, Peter Erskine, Herbie Mann Warren Vashe, George Duke and Benny Green


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czXQ42h3xg0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poI3gD0eZHg

 

Jan de Hass- Drums, Belgium
Graduate of the Music Academy in Hoeilaart (Belgium) and Berklee College of Music.
While in America Jan performed with renowned trombonist Phil Wilson and pianists Makoto Ozone and Dave Kikoski. Played as the regular drummer of the Belgium National Radio Orchestra, was the regular drummer of jazz great, harmonica legend, Toots Thielemans for 10 years, recorded and performed with jazz legend Chat Baker as well with guitarist Philip Catherine, Grammy award winner, clarinetist Eddie Daniels, renowned trumpet player Randy Brecker and saxophonists Rick Margiza and Jerome Richardson as well as tours with hundreds of international musicians in Belgium and around the world.
Jan is also an accomplished vibraphone player and a faculty member at the Antwerp Music Conservatory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8p-ha5d9ZmE

 

Heinrich von Kalnein- Saxophone/flute, Austria


Heinrich von Kalnein is one of the most high-profile jazz artists of today’s Austrian and German scene. After graduating with honors from the University of Music Graz, Austria in 1987 he continued his studies with David Liebman and Oliver Lake among others. Heinrich leads his trio "Kohiba' and JAZZ BIGBAND GRAZ. Performed with Take Six’‚ The New York Voices’ as well as with singers Jon Hendricks, Dianne Shur and Kurt Elling, Django Bates, Carla Bley, Bob Brookmeyer, Jay Clayton, Wayne Darling, Gil Evans, the Peter Herbolzheimer Bigband, Marc Johnson, Sheila Jordan, Nguyên Lê, Charlie Mariano, Bob Mintzer, Wolfgang & Christian Muthspiel, Ed Neumeister, Paquito d’Rivera, Steve Swallow and the Austrian National Public Radio symphony (ORF Radiosymphonieorchester) among others and in the following festivals: Northsea Jazzfestival(NL) Jazzfest Berlin (D), Jazzfest Bonn (D), Bolzano (I), Bremen jazzahead (D), Hofheim (D), Snow Jazz Gastein (A), Gdynia (PL), Guimaraes (P), Graz (A), Hamburg Elbjazz (D), Lisboa (P), Madrid (E), Magdeburg (D), Maribor (Slo), New Delhi (IND), New York (USA), Ploiesti (Ro), Saalfelden (A), Salzau Jazz Baltica (D), Salzburg Jazzherbst (A), Sibiu (Ro), St.Ingbert (D), St. Petersburg (RUS), Strasbourg (F), Usti Nad Labem (CZ), Trencin (SK), Vienne (F), Warsaw (PL), Weilheim (D), Wien (A), Wiesbaden (D), Wiesen (A), Wroclaw (PL). Additionally he worked as a musical producer and band member with the Vienna Art Orchestra performing worldwide. Currently he is living in Graz and holds a position as a professor for saxophone at the Jazz institute of the University of Music Graz KUG.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGAYV8pSk7s&index=1&list=PLDCEF32434CD3BA2E


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RyKHrOU2fxc&list=PLDCEF32434CD3BA2E&index=4

 

Attila Korb- trombone, Hungary
Graduate of the Frantz List Academy of Music, Budapest, trombone virtuoso Attila Korb is one of the leading forces of Hungary's jazz scene.
As a versatile musician he maters a wide range of styles ranging from Dixieland to contemporary jazz.
Attila performed in numerous festivals, such as Montreux, Ascona, Pori, Berlin, Oslo, Sacramento and Kobe (Japan). He also performed as a guest soloist at the Breda Jazz festival, Holland and toured with the European Jazz Orchestra. In 2007 he was awarded with the prestigious Hungarian National Radio Award for his contribution to music in Hungary.
Attila is also an accomplished trumpet player and pianist and specializes in arranging and choir conducting.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sWGo9cEFI8

 

Jeff Berlin- Bass, USA
As one of the most prominent and outstanding bass players in the world today, Jeff Berlin brings a unique voice to the bass approach and significant influence on thousands of bass players around the world. Jeff performed and recorded with music icons such as Frank Zappa, Alan Allan Holdsworth, Bill Buford, Larry Coryell, Billy Cobham, Scott Henderson, Dennis Chambers, Gil Evans, John McLaughlin, Michael Brecker, 'Yes', George Benson, Vinnie Colaiuta, Toots Thielemans, Al Demiola, Gary Burton, Mike Stern, Bob James and more.


The legendary bassist, Jack Bruce…" jeff is the best bass player I've ever heard in my life"
Carlos Santana…"The best bassist in the world".


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6at4jSG3cUc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNv7XHqpVCo

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gL1Je-O2B3o


Jeff Berlin's web site: http://www.jeffberlinbass.com/

 

Deborah J. Carter- Voice, USA
Jazz vocalist Deborah J. Carter was born in Hawaii. Graduate of the prestigious Berklee College of Music she defines her style as Metropolitan Jazz which reflects the urban jazz of the 21st century. Deborah released 5 albums under her name, ranging between Swing, fusion and Latin music. She performed at the prestigious North Sea Jazz Festival and the Baku (Azerbaijan) and Kiev (Ukraine) jazz festivals as well as with world famous orchestras such as Holland's Metropole Orchestra, the Berlin Radio orchestra, the Frankfurt and Berlin big bands and in Broadway.


Deborah performs frequently with her trio in Spain, Germany, Holland, China, NY and Japan and also conducts master classes in jazz singing in universities and music institutions around the world.


.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0L8dG-iNrk


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LOAcXsDcZ8


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FDuFZe7hhE


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Cm6NgCe4_g

 

The Festival in:

English http://www.icr.ro/jaffajazz2015en


Hebrew http://www.icr.ro/jaffajazz2015he


Romanian http://www.icr.ro/jaffajazz2015ro

 

Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv 8 Shaul Hamelech Blvd., 64733 Tel Aviv, Israel Phone: +972-3-696 17 46, +972-3-691 12 05 Fax: +972-3-691 12 04 www.icr.ro/tel-aviv/

 

Photo provided by the Romanian Cultural Institute  

 

 

 

 

 

Upon his arrival to Israel, international singer Matisyahu met with the ninth president of Israel Shimon Peres. During the meeting Matisyahu said: “The boycott is creating more borders and is no way to have peace”


Referring to the Jaffa riot that took place Tuesday night, Peres stated: “An extremist group tried to disturb the peace in Jaffa, but failed”

 

 

Yesterday, (Wednesday) the ninth President of Israel Shimon Peres met with international singer, Matisyahu. The singer visited the Peres Center for Peace in Jaffa prior to his performance this Saturday in Jerusalem. At the end of the meeting, Peres presented the singer with a symbolic dove sculpture, representing their shared love of the state of Israel and their passion for creating positive change in the world.

 

During the meeting, together they discussed the most recent, unfortunate events that took place in Jaffa on Tuesday. Peres expressed, “Yesterday, an extremist group tried to disturb the peace, but failed. This morning Jaffa came back to life.” Peres remains optimistic, saying, “Jaffa is a showcase of Jews and Arabs coexisting.”

 

 

Former President Shimon Peres and Matisyahu discussed the issues of the day, realizing that the art of music can heal some of the world’s wounds. Peres stated, “Singing is singing friendship, singing peace. The world without music would be a big mistake. People come in thousands to hear your songs- you were born to sing.”

 

Matisyahu addressed why he chose to visit the Peres Center for Peace in Jaffa and Israel at this time. He explained, “Jews from outside of Israel should come here, no matter what is happening. The boycott is creating more borders and is no way to have peace.”

 

Matisyahu expressed his gratitude for the opportunity to meet, with former President Shimon Peres closing by saying, “Thank you for what you did and for continuing to do what you do.”

 

Photos Silvia G Golan

 

 https://youtu.be/Co67NgHv1JY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRANSFORMS  Five weekends of Israeli and international events dedicated to fashion, textiles and jewelry

 

Exhibitions and sales at the Jaffa Port Gallery, in collaboration with TLVstyle

 

Jaffa Port Gallery presents “Transforms” – a series of weekend events exploring the relationship between fashion, design and art. Every weekend, for four consecutive weeks, 10 different designers will display their creations that will be available for sale at the gallery. The design concept of each event has its own unique DNA. The fifth weekend event will summarize the “Transforms” series with a general exhibition that will uncover the ONE OF works created by the designers participating in the project.

 

The exhibition at the gallery will be launched with a festive event dedicated to the fundraising on behalf of the Megemeria School, operated by YEDID – the Association for Community Empowerment. The Megemeria School of Jewellery was opened by Yvel founders Isaac and Orna Levy in 2010. The school offers professional training and employment opportunities for Ethiopian immigrants, thereby facilitating their social and professional integration into Israeli society.

 

www.megemeria.com

 

“Transforms” is a joint initiative of Galit Reismann with Limor Margulis, founder and director of the Jaffa Port Gallery.  

 

 Israeli Textile Weekend  October 15-16-17

 

Dedicated to Israeli fashion and textile designers that combine handmade fabrics in their work, creating contemporary and unique fashion items.

 

Participating designers: Mikedem Gallery-Tzuri Gueta / Adi Raffeld-Podhorzer / Adi Sharon / ADI YAIR/ MAYO by Anat Shlain / ALUMA / Frog by Einat Burg / Nili Ben Simon / Nulah by Ziva Epshtein / Second Skin by Elinor Nathaniel

 

 Jewelry Weekend  October 22-23-24

 

Dedicated to Israeli jewelers, the majority of whom have graduated from the Shenkar and Bezalel jewelry design departments. The event features contemporary jewelers, who combine their creations with innovative materials such as concrete, silicon and metals. All items are handmade and of uncompromising quality, featuring the individual “language” of the designers, expressing local aesthetics and inspiration from the local culture, urbanicity and nature.

 

Participating designers: Adi Lev design / FABRICA by Efrat Habani / Lia Elnatan / Punkt Jewelry by Natalie Shabtai / Danielle Keller / Traum studio / Mia Minsky / Megemeria, Social enterprise, Ethnic Jewelry / Haven Design by Hagit Abenheimer / Gregory Larin

 

 Italian Weekend October 29-30-31

 

International weekend of young and kicking Italian fashion designers, who for the first time will present their fashion items and accessories in Israel, alongside Israeli designers with an affinity to the boot-shaped country. The weekend will be dedicated to the advancement of relations between Italy and Israel.

 

Associate curator: Fabiana Magrì

 

Participating designers: Gelfer / Martella bags / Joseph Haver / Talia Sari / Michal Hidas / Duecentogrammi by Chiara Curreli (Italy) / Paolo Errico (Italy) / Neo´ Shop, Cinthia Fiaschi e Rosanna Contadini (Italy) / Paola Mirai (Italy) / Ludovica Cirillo byLUDO (Italy)

 

· Fashion Weekend  November 12-13-14

 

Dedicated to Israeli fashion and accessories designers, who will present their creations alongside the artwork of a renowned fashion illustrator that combines newspaper clippings from the 1950s in her works. This mix of successful designers will captivate your eyes with their use of different materials and exciting new patterns, as well as original and advanced techniques.

 

Participating designers: For Those Who Pray by Avigail Talmor / Doraya / HILI ARI / Gily Ilan / Justine Hats / Northern star by Nadav Rosenberg / Sharon Vaizer / Repelle by Naomi Maaravi / Tangens by Tania Zagaria / UNSELF by Pavel Bolo / Tovit Moshe art

 

· Final Exhibition Weekend  November 19-20-21

 

This exhibition summarizes the four preceding weekends – 40 designers participating in the project will present their one-of-a-kind works, created just for this exhibition, with the aim to get to know the designers content world and their unique touch. This exhibition will be dedicated to fundraising on behalf of the Megemeria School of Jewellery.

 

The weekends are curated by Galit Reismann – the design entrepreneur behind TLVstyle – innovative fashion tourism in Tel Aviv.

 

The Jaffa Port Gallery is located in an ancient building that underwent a strict preservation process by the architect Ilan Pivko. The Gallery is situated in the northern part of the port, in the first line to the sea, and its location serves as a great attraction to tourists from Israel and abroad.

 

The Jaffa Port Gallery initiates and develops special projects with a contemporary and multidisciplinary perception, outside the "acceptable" thinking in art, culture and community.

 

Opening hours:

Thursdays 17:00-22:00

Fridays 10:00-17: 0

Saturdays 12:00-21:00

 

 

 

 

La Galeria de Puta Madre - ART EXHIBITION - FANTASTIC FOUR

 

 The art exhibition "Fantastic Four" is presenting the marvelous artworks of 4 Israeli international artists:

 

Elior - Pop Art artist
Ruby Bat-Arnon - Figurative & Fantasy
Shlomi Nissim - Photographer & Pop Art Artist
Moty Fridman - Sculpture

 

The exhibition is open to visitors by appointment until 31/10

 

Please watch the amazing opening night video clip

 

https://youtu.be/G7Oqx-AsmXk

 

Gallery contact details:

972-(0)50-5216304

 

Gallery website:

LA GALERIA DE PUTA MADRE

 

 www.elior-art.com

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 Photo  Elior

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 48th Abu Gosh Vocal Music Festival will take place from October 2nd to 5th 2015. Directed by Hanna Zur, the festival has existed twice a year and in its present format since 1992. Concerts are held in the Church of Our Lady of the Ark of the Covenant, the church gracing the hill at Kiryat Ye’arim, and also in the intimate Crypt of the 12th century Benedictine Church of Abu Gosh. This magical venue, a cool retreat from the midday sun, nestles in a tranquil, exotic garden. In the upcoming festival, many of Israel’s finest choral ensembles and soloists can be heard in programs consisting of sacred- and secular music, folk music and, most importantly, music of Israeli composers.

 

There will be several events to appeal to festival-goers with a taste for early music. This festival’s guest artists include Hortus Musicus (Estonia) led by violinist and conductor Andres Mustonen, neither of them newcomers to the Israeli concert scene. With soprano Daniela Skorka as soloist, they will please early music lovers with a selection of mostly Renaissance vocal works, accompanied on period instruments (Concert no.7, October 4th). Concert no.5 (October 3rd) will present Baroque music of Vivaldi (“Stabat Mater”) and Purcell (“King Arthur”), with Shalev Ad-El conducting the Israel Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra Israeli. Soloists will be Revital Raviv, Hadas Faran, Reut Ventorero, Avital Deri, Moshe Hess, Haggai Grady, Eitan Drori, Guy Pelc and Yair Polishook, several of whom are well known on the Israeli Baroque music scene. In “Pergolesi – Stabat Mater”(Concert no.13, October 3rd) soprano Sharon Dvorin, mezzo-soprano Karin Shifrin and pianist Yoni Farhi will present Pergolesi’s “Stabat Mater” in its original version for two singers and organ. Soprano Ye’ela Avital, recorder player Doret Florentin, guitarist Gil Evron and percussionist Ori Dekel will take the listener on a journey of “Mediterranean Love – Hadjidakis, Theodorakis, Landini, Dufay” (Concert no.15, October 5th) with a full bill of really early music, starting with a 13th work and then progressing as far as the 21st century. Renowned Israeli countertenor Alon Harari, together with pianist Tal Samnon, will include some early English music delights in “On the Thames – London Awaits Him” (Concert no.16, October 5th). A unique event bound to attract Baroque music aficionados will be Ensemble PHOENIX’s Israeli premiere of Sicilian composer Michelangelo Falvetti’s (1642-1692) spectacular oratorio “Il Diluvio Universale” (Concert no.8, October 5th). PHOENIX musical director Dr. Myrna Herzog speaks of this music as being “characterized by sensuality and…Mediterranean expressivity”.

 

With Romantic music appealing to many concert-goers, here are some of the works to be heard at the Succoth Abu Gosh Festival: opening the festival on October 2nd (Concert no.1) will be Dvorak’s “Stabat Mater opus 58, performed in its original version for choir and piano. Hanna Zur will conduct the Ramat Gan Chamber Choir, with soloists: soprano Alla Vasilevitsky, alto Sigal Haviv, tenor Joseph Aridan and bass Alexey Kanonikov; Irit Rub is the pianist. Dvorak’s seldom-performed “Festive Mass for a Cathedral Inauguration in Bohemia” will be included in Concert no.6 October 4th; Michael Shani will conduct the Tel Aviv Chamber Choir, with organist Alexander Wolch. David Sebba will direct and accompany soloists of the Israeli Opera’s Meitar Opera Studio in music of Verdi and Puccini in “Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves” (Concert no.4, October 3rd). The Verdi “Requiem”, arranged for chamber ensemble by Michael Betzner-Brandt (Germany) will be performed by soloists and the Israeli Vocal Ensemble (Yuval Benozer, conductor and music director) on October 5th (Concert no.10). One Romantic work among a selection of other works to be heard by soloists and the Moran Ensemble (conductor: Naomi Faran) will be Schubert’s Mass no.2 in G major, D.167 (Concert no.2, October 2nd).

 

Festival fare is always enhanced by music from other traditions. The Kolan Quintet (Avraham Kosashvili, Simon Kricheli, Yosef Hadar, Matanel Vahtang, Reuven Bar Yosef) with present songs from Georgia and Russia, as well as Neapolitan- and Hassidic songs (Concert no.11, October 2nd). Soprano Keren Hadar, performing with Hortus Musicus, will include songs from Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, Macedonia and Armenia (Concert no.9, October 10th).

 

Israeli music will also be represented comprehensively, with works by Eyal Bat, Menachem Wiesenberg, Gil Aldema, Mordechai Zeira, Oedoen Partos, Yehezkel Braun, Yitzhak Edel, Paul Ben-Haim, Miki Gavrielov and more. Those of us interested to hear music of the young generation of Israeli composers might want to attend “Enchanted Tunes” (Concert no.14, October 3rd) featuring soprano Einat Aronstein and vibraphone player Oded Geitzhals; the program will include works by Udi Perlman (b.1990), Shai Cohen (b.1968), Assaf Roth (b.1973) and Micha Gilad (b.1992). In what promises to be a unique festival event, “Tel Aviv – New York” (Concert no.12, October 2nd), actor, singer and ‘cellist Eli Gorenstein, joined by pianist Guy Weingarten, will perform a variety of musical settings to words of some of Israel’s finest poets, followed by songs of such greats as Duke Ellington, Rogers and Hammesrstein, Charlie Chaplin and Paul Anka.

 

And as to those who fancy spending a day outdoors in the tranquil scenery of the Judean Hills while the weather is still conducive to such, there remains the opportunity to picnic, visit the high-quality craft stalls and enjoy a selection of concerts in the open area around the Kiryat Ye’arim Church.

 


 Hortus Musicus, Overseas guest artists: Andres Mustonen

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/
Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

Photo : Benedictine Monastery in Abu Gosh

Credit www.allaboutjerusalem.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 The PHOENIX Ensemble in the Israeli premiere of J-Ph. Rameau's complete chamber music

 

In a program titled “Tradition and Innovation”, Ensemble PHOENIX opened its 2015-2016 season with the Israeli premiere of the complete collection of Jean-Philippe Rameau’s “Pièces de clavecin en concerts”. Performing them were Geneviève Blanchard – Baroque flute/piccolo, Noam Schuss-violin, Marina Minkin-harpsichord and PHOENIX founder and musical director Myrna Herzog-viola da gamba. This writer attended the performance in the Ran Baron Hall of the Lin and Ted Arison Israel Conservatory of Music, Tel Aviv, on September 8th, 2015.

 

Best known for his operas and solo harpsichord music, J-Ph. Rameau (1683-1764) composed only one collection of chamber music works, but this work stands alone as a masterpiece and a groundbreaker in the chamber music genre. There are five trios – the composer referred to them as “concerts” - each having three movements, apart from the second, which comprises four. Rameau worked on them from 1737 to 1741, taking the initiative of giving each instrument an independent role; they were inspired by Gaspar LeRoux and Jean-Joseph Cassanea de Mondonville, both of whom had published harpsichord pieces with violin accompaniment. Rameau wrote: “I have given them the form of little suites for harpsichord, violin or flute, and viol or second violin”; he considered the collection to be predominantly pieces for solo harpsichord. Interestingly, he published them in score form, not common at the time, to allow each player to follow all parts.

 

As to the various extra-musical titles of pieces, the composer devised them with the help of his friends. How truly programmatic they are remains unclear, but the titles certainly serve an important purpose: they offer the listener a glimpse into the composer’s rich imagination, to members of his circle and into the lifestyle of wealthy musical patrons enjoying the arts and life’s delights, in general. The PHOENIX players also made it clear from the outset that these were no suites of stylized and impersonal courtly dances, no music that might float past the ears of noble society. And the pieces are not as abstract as how we might nowadays conceive the “chamber music” genre. These “concerts” are a genre unto their own in every way, inviting the listener to ponder Thamas Kouli Khan, hero of a pseudo-historical novel set in Persia in La Coulicam (1st concert), musical acquaintances such as in La Laborde (a harpsichord child prodigy who later wrote a book on the harpsichord in which he denounced equal temperament tuning as a vice!), La Boucon (a prominent woman harpsichordist), La Forqueray, La Marais and La Cupis (Marie-Anne de Cupis, a brilliant dancer, appeared in performances of several of Rameau's operas. She was the first woman to execute the entrechat quatre, to wear ballet slippers, the calf-length ballet skirt and the now standardized tights), patrons of the arts (La Livri, La Poplinière) and even a place - Le Vezinet - a picturesque countryside town in the environs of Paris, a location offering much to delight visitors. The collection does include some dance movements – the menuet, tambourin – as well as a few character pieces – L’agaçante (the annoying one), La timide, L’indiscrète, La pantomime..

 

The strength of the PHOENIX performance was the artists’ in depth enquiry and insight into each and every movement of the concerts, an exceptionally rich and motley collection of pieces - French music spiced with some Italian flavors. In their study of them, the concept of each piece has undergone fine chiseling to result in splendid execution of Rameau’s huge range of ideas, from the elegant rondeau of La Livri (1st Concert), its delicate, sedate and aristocratic melody (a “tombeau” dedicated to the Comte de Livri who had died that year) fashioned by the flute (Blanchard), to the folksy drone of pipes and heavy-footed enjoyment of La pantomime (4th Concert), punctuated by some small musical comments. Reference to folk music was also represented by the two tambourins (3rd Concert), the tambourin being a lively, duple Provençal dance form much liked and used by Rameau. Here, Blanchard played the melody on piccolo, reminding the listener that the tambourin would have originally been played on a small flute. In La Cupis (5th concert), flute and viol duet and converse gracefully, the viol (Herzog) utilizing the high register to meet the graceful flute at certain moments, at others, returning to support the harpsichord bass line. Rameau’s musical portrait La Forqueray (5th Concert) is a true masterpiece; in this gregarious fugue (celebrating the wedding that year of the great player and composer, Rameau’s friend) there was much give and take between harpsichord (Minkin) and violin (Schuss). The fine teamwork in L’agaçante (2nd Concert), with its opposing registers and unpredictable phrases punctuated by small pauses, made for interesting listening. We also receive an introduction to Monsieur Alexandre-Jean-Joseph Le Riche de La Poplinière, an especially rich tax-farmer and patron of the arts, at whose Paris mansion the best of chamber music was performed and heard. (Rameau, who received financial support from La Poplinière, was idolized by him and, it seems, also by his wife.) I enjoyed the jolly and slightly pompous description of the gentleman in La La Poplinière (3rd Concert) as the players halted here and there to allow the M. de La Poplinière to pose…or was he bowing?

 

The heart of the “Pièces de clavecin en concerts” is the harpsichord, its fully written-out obbligato part demanding and virtuosic. Marina Minkin’s reading of it was secure, interesting and brilliant in execution. The viol part, however, is also extremely challenging; from his instructions to the viol player, it is clear the Rameau was well aware of some of the impossibility of his demands! Herzog imagines it may have been played by Forqueray. She was playing on an original Andrea Castagnery 7-string French viol, built in 1744, three years after the concerts were published. The Baroque expertise of all four artists took the pieces beyond that of technical know-how, recreating the evocative selection of musical vignettes in all their intricate detail. Altogether, the ensemble’s careful and strategic consensus on such elements as tempo, ornamentation, doubling and inégal playing made for a result that was stylish, personal, convincing and enormously enjoyable.

 

Photo  : Genevieve Blanchard, Marina Minkin, Myrna Herzog, Noam Schuss  Provided by  Myrna Herzog

 

 Pamela Hickman's Music Interviews Blog  http://pamelahickmansmusicinterviews.blogspot.co.il/

Pamela Hickman's Concert Critique Blog  http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sport Tech Pitch event


Mercredi 9 septembre 2015 de 13:00 à 15:00 (Heure : Israël)

Tel Aviv-Yafo, Israël

 

Register here:

 

 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/billets-sport-tech-pitch-event-18410193384

 

 

 

 

Has a 2,000 Year Old Podium Been Found in the City of David?

 

A unique stepped structure exposed on the street ascending from the Siloam Pool to the Temple Mount raises questions among researchers at the Israel Antiquities Authority

 

An intriguing find consisting of an impressive pyramid-shaped staircase constructed of large ashlar stones was uncovered in an archaeological excavation currently conducted by the Israel Antiquities Authority. The excavation is located in the Jerusalem Walls National Park in the City of David, site of ancient Jerusalem, and is being carried out in cooperation with the Israel Nature and Parks Authority and the City of David Foundation.

 

This structure, situated alongside the 2,000 year old Second Temple stepped street, which carried pilgrims on their way from the Shiloah (Siloam) Pool to the Temple, which stood atop the Temple Mount. The street, a section of which was excavated in the past, is remarkably well-preserved and is built of enormous stone slabs. The street most likely runs above the 2,000 year old drainage channel, discovered a number of years ago, which carried rain water out of the city. It was constructed sometime in the fourth decade of the first century CE, and was one of the largest construction projects undertaken in Jerusalem during the Second Temple period. Dozens of whole pottery vessels, stone vessels and glassware were found at the foot of the pyramid-shaped staircase.

 

According to archaeologists Nahshon Szanton and Dr. Joe Uziel, who direct of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "The structure exposed is unique. To date such a structure has yet to be found along the stepped street in the numerous excavations that have taken place in Jerusalem and to the best of our knowledge outside of it. For this reason, its exact use remains enigmatic. The structure is built along the street in a place that is clearly visible from afar by passers-by making their way to the Temple. We believe the structure was a kind of monumental podium that attracted the public’s attention when walking on the city’s main street. It would be very interesting to know what was said there 2,000 years ago. Were messages announced here on behalf of the government? Perhaps news or gossip, or admonitions and street preaching – unfortunately we do not know. Bliss and Dickie, two British archaeologists who discovered a small portion of this structure about 100 years ago, mistakenly thought these were steps that led into a house that was destroyed. They would certainly be excited if they could come back today and see it completely revealed”.

 

We know from rabbinic sources there were “stones” that were used for public purposes during the Second Temple period. For example, one source cites the “auction block” in connection with the street: “[a master] will not set up a market stand and put them (slaves) on the auction block” (Sifra, BeHar 6). In the Mishnah and Talmud the “Stone of Claims” is mentioned as a place that existed in Jerusalem during the Second Temple period: “Our Rabbis taught: There was a Stone of Claims in Jerusalem: whoever lost an article repaired thither, and whoever found an article did likewise. The latter stood and proclaimed, and the former submitted his identification marks and received it back. And in reference to this we learnt: Go forth and see whether the Stone of Claims is covered” (Bava Metzia 28:B).

 

On Thursday (3.9), at the City of David Studies of Ancient Jerusalem’s 16th Annual Conference that will be open to the public, Nahshon Szanton and Dr. Joe Uziel will present their findings from the excavation and the different interpretations regarding the nature of the podium. According to them, “Given the lack of a clear archaeological parallel to the stepped-structure, the purpose of the staircase remains a mystery. It is certainly possible the rabbinical sources provide valuable information about structures, such as this, although for the time being there is no definitive proof.”

 

Information about the conference can be found on the City of David website: www.cityofdavid.org.il.

 

Photo

 

Dr. Joe Uziel, codirector of the excavation from the Israel Antiquities Authority, sitting atop the stepped structure from the Second Temple period. Photo: Shai Halevy; courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

The stepped structure from the Second Temple period. Photo: Shai Halevy; courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

 

 

 

 

 

 

“English on Stage” – Perfect for Diplomats.

 

Last night at “Habimah” (considered to be Israel’s National Theater) we enjoy a performance of the strangely titled “Little Black Dress”. Strange, until we saw the performance.

 

Tradition has it that every woman has a little black cocktail dress in her wardrobe, a dress to be worn for understated elegance at receptions and parties (think office Christmas parties, UN diplomatic receptions, and the likes). This play, performed exclusively by woman and with a strong feminist theme, is most definitely aimed at both sexes. (By the way, the supporting musicians are men). There is no story line and very little dialogue: the performance is composed of excellent renditions of popular songs, some going back years (Somewhere Over The Rainbow – remember Judy Garland? And Diamonds are A Girl’s Best Friend – the wonderful Marilyn Monroe), to modern unique renditions of works made famous by Aretha, Whitney, Adele, Cher, Beyonce and others. Listening to the interpretation of “Summertime” was amazing.

 

“Little Black Dress” celebrates the versatility of women and in a light-hearted tone (but fused with seriousness), and tells men exactly what women mean when they say something. (Do not take their words literally!)

 

Lively, stylish, interesting, amusing, toe-tapping, joyful and unique are some of the words that come to mind when we think it over. And of course, all in English. This is the second performance your “DIPLOMACY” correspondent has seen, the other being “Tom’s Diner”, also a pleasurable experience.

 

Until October, “English on Stage” will not have any performances. Please check the website then  ( www.englishonstage.co.il ) for performances, locations and times. Finally, you can enjoy Israeli theater in English.

 

 

Related Articles:

http://www.diplomacy.co.il/diplomatic-magazine/art-culture/3169-little-black-dress-next-show-august-11-habima-theatre-tel-aviv

 

Photo provided by Meirav Zur

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Israeli Opera celebrates 30 years of performance at a gala event hosted by the Israeli president and his wife

 

On July 30th 2015, the President of the State of Israel Mr. Reuven (Rubi) Rivlin and his wife Mrs. Nechama Rivlin hosted an event celebrating 30 years of the reopening of the Israeli Opera. It began as a festive garden party in the attractive grounds of the presidential residence. A small exhibition of sets and costumes from various opera productions was also on display in the gardens. As daylight faded on this balmy, breezy Jerusalem evening, guests were invited to take their seats in the open-air concert area where the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion, the resident orchestra of the Israeli Opera, was seated on the stage, to be directed by Israeli-born Daniel Cohen, a conductor active and renowned on the international opera scene.

 

Emceeing the evening was actor, singer, writer and producer Chaim Topol. Welcoming the guests, he opened the evening’s cultural procedures with a small reminder of the fact that opera is a broad-spanning art form - a story in song and action accompanied by instruments, all directed by a conductor, a genre also including choreography, costumes and scenery. President Rivlin spoke of the 1917 vision of Mordechai Golinkin, a dream that came true in 1923 with Golinkin’s Palestine Opera. He also spoke of American opera singer Edis de Philippe, who arrived in Israel in 1945, creating the Israel National Opera, a company that performed all over the country and that attracted many great international names from the opera world to perform in it. In 1982, the Ministry of Culture and Education ceased its funding for the company and it closed. The Council for Arts and Culture created the New Israeli Opera in 1985, with Uri Offer as its general director for a decade. Today the Israeli Opera is led by its general manager Hanna Munitz. Rivlin spoke of the company’s fine standards, performing not only in Tel Aviv, its repertoire also including new works of Israeli composers, of late, operas by Haim Permont and Yoni Rechter. Minister of Culture and Sport Miri Regev spoke of this being an auspicious event, that music creates solidarity and that the Israeli Opera is an important institution, a voice of peace, and of its important role of bringing opera performances to the periphery. Hanna Munitz mentioned the Meitar Opera Studio, a training school for emerging opera singers. She spoke of opera performance experiences taking place in kindergartens, schools and parks and of the festive, full-scale performances at Masada, “in the middle of the desert”, in her words. She spoke of a new community project – a choir made up of small children from the Kyriat Hinuch School in Jaffa, later heard at this event with soprano Linor Ilan.

 

As the last of the birds took their leave from a day of singing and a full moon made its appearance in the night sky, the concert of opera favorites sung by some of the Israeli Opera’s younger and more veteran soloists began. The New Israeli Opera’s first production was Henry Purcell’s “Dido and Aeneas”, so it was meaningful to begin the musical program with “Dido’s Lament”, performed by the young, outstanding mezzo-soprano Na’ama Goldman, who later joined Argentinian tenor Gustavo Porta in the “Seguidilla” from Bizet’s “Carmen”, a performance bristling with emotion and temperament. Also displaying the high standards and competence of the homegrown younger generation of opera singers was Hila Fahima in fresh, agile singing of arias from Verdi’s “Rigoletto” and Mozart’s “Magic Flute”, the latter a tour-de-force of drama and excitement. Latvian-born soprano Ira Bertman and Maestro Cohen collaborated closely In a rich and moving rendition of “I lived for art, I lived for love” from Puccini’s “Tosca”. Baritone Noah Briger took the audience with him in his bold, jaunty performance of the “Toreador Song” from “Carmen”, sung in Hebrew (translation: David Sebba). Wielding her large voice with superb control, Romanian-born soprano Mirella Gradinaru created the magic of bel canto singing in “Norma’s Prayer” from Bellini’s “Norma”. No new face to the Israeli Opera, Argentinian tenor Gustavo Forta won the audience over with the anguished farewell to life in “And the stars shone” from “Tosca” and a spine-chilling “None shall sleep” from Puccini’s “Turandot”. One of the major soloists of the Israeli Opera since emigrating from the former Soviet Union, bass-baritone Vladimir Braun has performed more than 50 roles in the company. At this event, his luxuriant performance from Rossini’s “Barber of Seville” created the excitement, tension and theatrical experience of the opera stage. From “Schitz”, a new opera composed by Yoni Rechter, based on Hanoch Levin’s play of the same name (premiered in July 2015) we heard Ira Bertman, Yael Levita, Noah Briger and Oded Reich in “At 6 in the evening”, the opera’s user-friendly music written in tonal musical language.

 

The Israeli Opera gala event was an evening to remember – the tranquil atmosphere of the leafy grounds of the presidential residence, the trees either side of the stage lit up in changing colors, the music, a host of fine performances and a sense of pride the Israeli Opera has created in the hearts of so many of us.

 

 

 The article was published at : http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/


pamela hickman's concert critique blog

 

 

 Photos Mark Neumann   /  GPO

 

 

 

 

 

 

LITTLE BLACK DRESS

 

An energetic theatrical performance  Little Black Dress celebrates the versatility of women by fusing theater, music, and fashion. This extraordinary production includes theatrical & comedic acts depicting womanhood, along with unique interpretations of beloved hits by the iconic Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Adele, Cher, and many more. The fabulous performances feature beautiful dresses designed specifically for the show's talented actresses, continuously restyled throughout the show.

 

The exciting musical show produced by Israel's professional English-language theater, English On Stage, in cooperation with Habima National Theater of Israel  .

 

This extraordinary show has had full-house performances and is back for more, featuring an all-female professional production team hailing from the U.S., U.K., and Israel, as well as dynamic musicians on stage, and specially-designed dresses for the talented performers, continuously restyled throughout the show.

 

THE PERFORMANCE IS COMPLETELY IN ENGLISH, and men are welcomed.

 

Featuring Shir Zelinger,Tamar Bettelheim, Noeat Kedem, Tami Machnai (piano/vocals), Shahar Ratzenberg (drums), Yaniv Azikri (bass guitar), and Meirav Zur.

Dir.: Meirav Zur.

Music Dir.: Shir Zelinger. Assoc Music Dir.: Tami Machnai.

Styling: Wendy Lehmann. Dress Design: Efrat Besandilov

 

Little Black Dress is not only female-centered in content, but has also been created by a predominantly female production team, hailing from the U.S.A., the U.K., and Israel. Completely in English, performers will also be accompanied by musicians on stage.

Male audience members are of course welcomed. Audiences will feast their eyes and ears on this fun show!

 

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tkc004crJQ

 

NEXT SHOW: August 11, 20:30, Habima 4, Sderot Tarsat 2, Tel Aviv

 

TICKETS:


Full price at the door: 100 NIS

Advanced Online Purchase, PREMIUM Seat: 85 NIS

Advanced Online Purchase, STANDARD Seat, 80 NIS

 

Tickets : http://www.tixwise.co.il/en/lbd1208

 

  At Habima 4, Habima National Theatre, 2 Sderot Tarsat, Tel Aviv.

 

More info at English On Stage website: http://www.englishonstage.co.il

 

 Photo provided by  Merav Zur

 

 

 

 

 

Remains of the Great Synagogue and Shulhof of Vilna are Rediscovered Seventy Years after their Destruction by the Nazis


The remains, identified in a Ground Penetrating Radar survey, will be uncovered in an archaeological excavation and displayed as part of a memorial for the magnificent Jewish community of Vilna

 

A Ground Penetrating Radar survey conducted in June 2015 in Vilnius, Lithuania has uncovered the underground remains of the Great Synagogue and Shulhof of Vilna, now lying partially below a modern school. These important remnants of what was before the Holocaust, Lithuania's greatest synagogue, will be exposed in an excavation to commence next year.


The magnificent Great Synagogue of Vilna (Vilnius) in Lithuania, was the oldest and most significant monument of Litvak Jewry. Sadly, like most of the edifices of Jewish culture in Lithuania, the Great Synagogue was lost during the Holocaust. A joint team, led by Dr. Jon Seligman from the Israel Antiquities Authority, Zenonas Baubonis of the the Culture Heritage Conservation Authority of Lithuania, together with Prof. Richard Freund of the University of Hartford, have just completed a successful season to identify the remains of the synagogue using ground penetrating radar.


Built in the 17th century in Renaissance-Baroque style, the Great Synagogue of Vilna was surrounded over time with other community buildings, including twelve synagogues, the community council, kosher meat stalls, the famous Strashun library, a complex of miqva'ot (ritual baths) and other communal institutions that formed a great centre of Torah study, the beating heart of the Lithuanian Jewish movement of Mitnagdim and the home for Rabbi Eliyahu, the Vilna Gaon.
After centuries of existence, with the destruction of the entire Jewish community of Vilna, this most important shrine of the Jews of Lithuania was ransacked and burnt by the Germans during World War II, the remains later demolished by the Soviet authorities and a modern school was constructed on the site.


In a season of work, conducted in June 2015, the results of the ground penetrating radar survey showed significant remains of the synagogue below the surface, including sections of the Great Syanagogue and possible remnants of the miqva'ot. Excavation is planned at the site in 2016 with the hope of exposing these remains for research and to display to them to the- general public as a fitting memorial to the important Jewish community of Vilna.


It is proposed that the future excavation will be conducted by a mixed team of archaeologists and student volunteers from Lithuania, Israel and the worldwide Jewish community, with the aim of ensuring that Jewish built cultural heritage is seen as an important and inseparable part of Lithuanian heritage that needs to be celebrated by all and preserved for perpetuity. The Israel Antiquities Authority encourages the public to take part in future excavations at the site and welcomes sponsorship of this exciting project to uncover the remians of the Great Synagogue of Vilna. Anybody wishing to take part can contact the Israel Antiquities Authority through its website.


A joint team also includes Professor Harry Jol of the University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire; Professor Philip Reeder of Duquesne University and Dr. Vladimir Levin of the Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem have just completed a successful season to identify the remains of the synagogue using ground penetrating radar.

 

Photo


1. Prof. Harry Jol & Nicole Awad conducting a Ground Penetrating Radar survey at the site of the Great Synagogue of Vilna in Lithuania. Photographic Credit: Jon Seligman, Courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

 

 

Video of the Ground Penetrating Radar suevery at the Great Synagogue of Vilna. Photography: Joan Silber

 

https://youtu.be/PKLZXOXdciA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LITTLE BLACK DRESS

The exciting musical show produced by Israel's professional English-language theater, English On Stage, in cooperation with Habima National Theater of Israel, is back by popular demand this July, following a successful sold-our premiere performance this past May.


Little Black Dress celebrates the versatility of women by fusing theater, music, and fashion. This extraordinary production includes theatrical & comedic acts depicting womanhood, along with unique interpretations of beloved hits by the iconic Aretha Franklin, Whitney Houston, Adele, Cher, and many more. The fabulous performances feature beautiful dresses designed specifically for the show's talented actresses, continuously restyled throughout the show.

 

Little Black Dress is not only female-centered in content, but has also been created by a predominantly female production team, hailing from the U.S.A., the U.K., and Israel. Completely in English, performers will also be accompanied by musicians on stage. Male audience members are of course welcomed. Audiences will feast their eyes and ears on this fun show!

 

Featuring: Shir Zelinger,Tamar Bettelheim, Noeat Kedem, Tami Machnai, Meirav Zur.


Directed by: Meirav Zur


Musical Director: Shir Zelinger


Associate Musical Director: Tami Machnai


Musicians: Tami Machnai (piano), Shahar Ratzenberg (drums), Yaniv Azikri (double bass/guitar)


Styling: Wendy Lehmann


Dress Designer: Efrat Besandilov

 

SHOW INFO:


Sun., July 26, 20:30 (doors open at 20:00)


at Habima 4, Habima National Theatre, 2 Sderot Tarsat, Tel Aviv.


TICKETS: http://www.tixwise.co.il/en/lbd2607


More info at English On Stage website: http://www.englishonstage.co.il

 

 Photo provided by Meirav Zur

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE "FRIENDS OF ZION MUSEUM" IN JERUSALEM IS NOW OPEN - PRESENTING THE OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION OF CHRISTIANS TO THE STATE OF ISRAEL

 

Former President Shimon Peres, Chairman of the International Board of the Museum stated: "We are very grateful to all those people who created this miracle because it was a miracle of people including Friends of Zion, Jewish and non-Jewish. Nothing is greater than the cause of friendship among human beings"

 

Jerusalem- After many years of hard work the Friends of Zion Museum is now open. The Museum is currently in its soft launch phase and operates from the center of Jerusalem, as a testimony to the thousands of people, who helped the Jewish nation over the last 200 years, through periods such as the British Mandate, Holocaust, and right up to the establishment of the State of Israel.

 

The Friends of Zion Museum is an experiential tourism site that captivates the senses and includes some of the most technologically advanced exhibits in the world. The Museum is housed in a four -story building and is fully accessible. Guests will be treated to a three-dimensional experience, original musical score, unique lighting, and stunning video mapping, all produced specifically for the location. Its construction included three-dimensional maps and exhibits that enhance the visitor experience and tell the story of the steadfast Christian support for the Jewish people.

 

Visitors to the site begin their tour with a spectacular panoramic presentation following a personal welcome from former President Shimon Peres, the Chairman of the International Board of the Museum. In his greeting, Peres said: "We are very grateful to all those people who created this miracle because it was a miracle of people including Friends of Zion Jewish and non-Jewish. Nothing is greater than the cause of friendship among human beings".

 

The Museum is supported by thousands of donors from around the world. It tells the story of heroes such as US President Harry Truman, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, Professor George Bush and Orde Wingate, who stood by the State of Israel and the Jewish people. It also tells the story of Oskar Schindler, Raoul Wallenberg and the Ten Boom family, who risked their lives and the lives of their families to save Jews persecuted during the holocaust. They would later be recognized as Righteous Among Nations, by the State of Israel.

 

The Museum boasts a diverse international board of trustees such as former Minister, Major General (Res.) Yossi Peled, former Chief of Staff, Lt. Gen. (Res.) Dan Halutz, former Minister of Justice, Professor Yaakov Neeman, Major General (Res.) Danny Yatom, and many others.

 

We invite you to join the thousands of visitors who have already experienced this wonderful new museum.

 

Museum Address: Friends of Zion Museum, 20 Yosef Rivlin Street, in the Nahalat Shiv'a neighborhood of Jerusalem.

 

The Museum is currently open to visitors by reservation on the Museum's website:

 

www.fozmuseum.com or by emailing our reservation department at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or +972-2-532-9400.

 

 

 

 

 photos provided by the Museum PR

 

 

 

 

  

The Israel Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra closed its 2014-2015 season with “Shakespeare”, a concert directed by Shalev Ad-El, who has served as the orchestra’s musical director and principal conductor since 2013. Ad-El also accompanied on the harpsichord. The event hosted the distinguished countertenor Andreas Scholl (Germany), sopranos Hadas Faran-Asia and Shira Petershnik, also the Moran Choir (director: Naomi Faran). This writer attended the concert on July 4th in the Recanati Auditorium of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art.

 

The program opened with Gioachino Rossini’s Overture to “Otello”. In its plot, the opera is mostly a far cry from that of Shakespeare’s “Othello”. When Lord Byron saw the opera in Venice in 1818, he wrote “They have been crucifying Othello into an opera…Music good but lugubrious…” “Lugubrious” it was not under the baton of Shalev Ad-El. In Rossini’s nine-minute bird’s eye view of the opera, its melodies and moods, we heard performance that was brisk, compelling and bristling with excellent rhythmical impetus. Rossini’s masterful orchestration of this overture in andante mode also offered some delightful solos to NKO players.

 

Andreas Scholl, no new face to Israeli audiences, was joined by Ad-El (harpsichord) for the performance of three Henry Purcell songs and one of Thomas Campion, beginning with Purcell's “Music for a While”. A unique song of great beauty, the artists shaped and flexed phrases, taking time to ponder the song’s different levels of meaning, from the world of Greek mythology and the Oedipus legend, to its darker side, to its statement on the power of music. Scholl’s vocal depiction of the snakes dropping one by one from Alecto’s head was almost visual. In “Sweeter than Roses”, from Pausanias (1695), Scholl gives life to the song’s emotions, from the improvisatory, ornate and languorous opening, to the effects of a kiss – first a frozen sense of shock, then a fiery, passionate response, as expressed by leaps and a rapid tempo change, to be followed by a section celebrating the power of love. An astounding song, here is a miniature drama so daring and theatrical for its time and ours and always so gripping when performed well. Then, restoring a sense of tranquility, we heard “Evening Hymn”, a glimpse into the sacred element of Purcell’s songs. The opening piece in Henry Playford’s collection of “Harmonia Sacra” (1688), this is not church music but would probably have been sung as part of simple domestic devotional service. Embellishing the keyboard part, a 5-bar ground bass that shifts a few times, Ad-El chose to play it using the lute register, thus creating an intimate setting. Scholl‘s wonderfully controlled restraint reflected the meditative content of the hymn. Then to Thomas Campion's whimsical lute song “I care not for these ladies” with Scholl flexing the pace and highlighting the girl’s ambiguous utterances here and there to present the text’s flirtatious double entendres and dancelike rhythm in a most entertaining way. Purcell’s works and those of his contemporaries form an important part of Scholl’s repertoire. His performance of them is informed, detailed and vivid, his word-painting engaging, as he uses vibrato to emphasize a pivotal idea (verbal or musical). At 47, his voice remains supple and full, his manner relaxed and communicative. In addition to teaching and conducting in many countries, Shalev Ad-El is an outstanding and internationally known harpsichordist with a prestigious worldwide career. His attentive accompaniments to the Purcell songs were subtle and sophisticated. In a very different vein, Scholl spoke of Israeli singer and songwriter Idan Raichel sending him an original melody, requesting that Scholl find words to suit it. Scholl came up with an old German poem “In stiller Nacht” (On a quiet night). He sang this as his encore, with harpsichordist/pianist Tamar Halperin’s arrangement for voice and string ensemble.

 

Performed by the Netanya Kibbutz Orchestra under the baton of Shalev Ad-El, we then heard Menahem Nebenhaus’ “Dowland Song Remix Suite”. In this work, Scholl sang three mournful Dowland songs - “Come heavy sleep”, “In darkness let me dwell” and “Sorrow Come” - first, to the accompaniment of a string ensemble (an association to the viol consort of Dowland’s time) and later to be backed by the orchestra whose agenda branched out to consist of some rich orchestral writing, taking the listener to later styles with jazzy moments and quotes from well-known works of Mozart, Wagner, etc., all these fragments referring to love, night, sadness and death. The audience enjoyed this collage - a dynamic, colorful canvas concluding with an “unadulterated” final octave, returning the listener to the Renaissance style. Conductor, composer and music educationalist, Menahem Nebenhaus (b.1960) has encouraged and inspired young musicians through his work with the Young Israeli Philharmonic Orchestra, the IDF Education Corps Chamber Orchestra and the Thelma Yellin Symphony Orchestra and the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology) Symphony Orchestra.

 

We then heard a number of movements from Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, providing incidental music to Shakespeare’s play of the same name. Tutored in French, German and English as children, Felix and his siblings enjoyed reading plays together, including those of Shakespeare. With its fairies, elves and magic spells appealing to the children, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” was a favorite, with Felix familiar with this play from his early years. The appealing and effervescent overture was written in 1826, when the composer was only 17, with the incidental music itself composed 16 years later. With their characteristic voice culture and finely blended harmony, the young singers of the Moran Choir sang with delicacy and competence, capturing Mendelssohn’s world of youthful imagination. Sopranos Hadas Faran-Asia and Shira Peturshnik, their richness of vocal color contending well with orchestra and choir, contributed to the subtlety and nobility of the music. Conducting without the score, Maestro Ad-El’s reading of the work sprang to life with fresh, exciting and finely crafted orchestral sounds. Never discounting any gesture, he recreated the work’s magic and naiveté, its yearning and gentle humor, from the four mysterious and evocative opening chords of the overture which invite the listener to enter the magical forest outside Athens where the story plays out, through the chiaroscuro effect of the woodwinds in the Scherzo, to the horn solo describing the sleeping lovers, to the Wedding March that re-establishes the world of humans and floods the scene with daylight. Performing “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” demands fine wind-playing; the NKO did not disappoint.

 

The event concluded with a polished performance of “MiMa’amakim” (Out of the depths) from the second CD of the Idan Raichel Project, performed by the Moran Choir, conducted by Naomi Faran and accompanied on piano and with percussion. In a polished, superbly coordinated performance of delicate singing and nicely choreographed movements, the young singers presented the song in an intoxicating mix of European and eastern rhythms and melody.

 

 The article was published at : http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

pamela hickman's concert critique blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Darkroom” by director Itamar Alcalay won the first prize of $50,000, at the Pitching Event of the Sam Spiegel International Film Lab

 

Tonight, on 11th of July at the Jerusalem Film Festival, the jury of the Sam Spiegel International Film Lab announced the two Film Lab projects that will receive production prizes totaling $70,000 in production grants.

 

The first prize of $50,000 was awarded to the script “Darkroom”, by director Itamar Alcalay and producers Amir Harel and Ayelet Kait (Lama Films) from Israel. The second prize of $20,000 was awarded to Ferit Karahan and producer Gabriele Oricchio for his script “The Death of Black Horses”.

 

The chairwoman of the jury, Kirsten Niehuus, General Director, Medienboard Berlin-Brandenburg GmbH (Germany), shared the jury’s reasons for their decision, saying they were impressed by the level of all the scripts and have chosen to award the prizes to passionate directors-writers with a special urgency, a unique voice and artistic courage.

 

The stellar jury included Olivier Père – General Director, ARTE France Cinéma (France), Meinolf Zurhorst – Director of Film Department, ZDF (Germany), Katriel Schory – Director of The Israel Film Fund (Israel), Michèle Halberstadt – Distributor & Producer, ARP Selection (France), Ewa Puszczynska - Film Producer, Opus Films (Poland) and Hungarian director Laszlo Nemes, the writer-director of the 2015 Cannes Grand Prix winner, Son of Saul- which was developed in the Sam Spiegel Lab in 2013.

 

In addition to the jury prizes, Paris based Digital District post-production studio has generously granted a post-production award of €25,000 to the Israeli project "Aya" by Mihal Brezis & Oded Binnun, produced by Cassis Films.

 

The award ceremony concluded the Sam Spiegel Lab’s fourth year of activity: 11 scripts with potential for excellence, by directors who want to make a first or second full length feature film, were selected from all over the world to take part in a process of seven months of intensive work with three of the world’s leading script editors.

 

Due the Lab’s unique concept of improving the scripts and strengthen the projects production’s feasibility:


Twelve projects of the Lab’s first developed scripts were already shot in Israel, Ivory Coast, Germany, Uruguay and USA, Hungary, Montenegro, Italy and Sri Lanka, and had their world premiere in Cannes, Tribeca, Sundance and other film festivals.

 

The Sam Spiegel International Film Lab was launched in December 2011. Its Founding Director is Renen Schorr, and it is co-directed by Ifat Tubi.

 

The Lab is supported by The Israel State Lottery’s Culture & Arts Council, The Beracha Foundation, The Jerusaelm Film & Television Fund, The Jerusalem Development Authority, The City of Jerusalem, The Sam Spiegel Foundation, The Israel Film Fund and The Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

 

 

Photo : Yossi Zabker

 

 

 

 

 

Up All Night at Tel Aviv 2015 White Night Europa

 

In the thirteenth annual White Night celebration, the Delegation of the European Union to the State of Israel and EU Member State embassies in Israel joined forces with the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality to produce 'White Night Europa', a celebration of European culture and European Israeli collaboration.

 

The urban center of Tel Aviv-Yafo contains the largest concentration in the world of buildings designed in the International Style (also known as Bauhaus architecture,) which give the city its special standing in the architectural heritage of the modern period. In recognition of this, in 2003 Tel Aviv’s White City was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. Ever since, for 13 consecutive years, the Tel Aviv-Yafo municipality has marked UNESCO's declaration with a series of White Night events that incorporate the city’s energy and vitality that earned it the title of Israel’s "nonstop city."

 

This year, the Delegation of the European Union to the State of Israel and EU Member State embassies in Israel joined forces with the Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality to produce 'White Night Europa', a celebration of European culture and European–Israeli collaboration.

 

Tel Aviv-Yafo offers a warm home to many cultural institutions, as well as artists and creators, who are nurtured by the city and keep its pulse going. The city is the source of inspiration for abundant and diverse cultural undertakings, and is open to any display of original thinking.

 

White Night is a celebration featuring dozens of events that take place at the same time throughout the city – both outdoors and in cultural centers – beginning in the early hours of the evening and continuing through the night until the next morning. The events are open to the public, either free of charge or for a nominal fee, and invite everyone to enjoy a wide and unique variety of performances.

 

Five events took place under the 'White Night Europa' banner on 25 June:

 

• Delishow, at Rothschild 1 Plaza – a fashion and culinary mash-up in which Israeli and European chefs and designers from eight EU member states (France, Belgium, Austria, Portugal, Lithuania, Greece, Romania and Czech Republic) prepared jointly created dishes and put on a fashion show of items designed especially for the event

 

• Touch Me Baby! at the Jaffa Port - an exhibition of video art with the participation of Israeli and European students of the Video and New Media Studies, Screen-Based Arts Department, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem

 

• A Really Quiet Headphones Party at Rabin Square. Based on smartphones and Radio 102 FM’s smartphone app and featuring top DJs from Belgium and the Netherlands.

 

• The Execution of Clown X took place at Bialik Square: A rabble-rousing wild and urban theater-circus show from Reaction Circus together with circus performers from Germany and France.

 

• Italian Jazz on the Boulevard, at 17 Ben Gurion Boulevard.

 

White Night Europa 2015 was a huge success. Tens of thousands of visitors came to experience the Nonstop City, resulting in a surge of participants in the citywide cultural festivities.

 

Photo

White night Europa 2015. Image copyright: Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality

 

https://youtu.be/LvQ2bNMl8YA

 

 

 

 

 

 June 25, 2015 // White Night is a celebration featuring dozens of events that take place at the same time throughout Tel Aviv – both outdoors and at cultural centers – starting in the early hours of the evening and ending in the morning.

 

Photo provided by Tel Aviv Muni

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The "Made in Germany" exhibition will be held at the end of June to celebrate the 50th anniversary of economic ties between Israel and Germany


The exhibition will be open to the public (free of charge) between the 29th and 30th of June between 10:00-18:00 at the David InterContinental Hotel in Tel Aviv

 

To honor the 50th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Israel and Germany, the German-Israeli Chamber of Industry and Commerce (AHK Israel) and the German-Israeli Economic Association (DIW) will hold an exhibition staging the past and present economic ties between the two countries and their development throughout the last decades. The exhibition, which will be shown in Tel Aviv, includes a variety of exhibits and events for the general public as well as for entrepreneurs, business people and scientists.


The historical section of the exhibition will present the integration and development of German brands in the Israeli market by illustrating the initial rejection and the gradual acceptance of the partnership between the two countries. Exhibitors include well-known German and Israeli companies and institutions, among them Audi, Lufthansa, Deutsche Telekom, Merck Serono, Siemens, Mercedes, Teva and many others.


The car manufacturers Audi and Mercedes and the airlines Lufthansa and Germania will present transportation vehicles of the past and present. Visitors have the chance to win flight tickets to Germany sponsored by Germania. The artists David Gerstein (Israel) and Otmar Alt (Germany) will present a joint exhibition including 30 works of art created together in a studio in Israel. Guests may also enjoy the beer garden offering cold German beer for free. In addition, a fashion show will be held, presenting dresses and haute couture by the German designer Marc Cain.


The exhibition is interactive and represents the newest and most innovative trends appealing to the public, entrepreneurs, scientists, investors, and other decision makers.


The exhibition will be officially opened on June 28th in the presence of Vice Chancellor of Germany and Minister of Economic Affairs and Energy, Sigmar Gabriel and his delegation, including businessmen and women, politicians, and journalists. The exhibition will be open to the public (free of charge) on June 29th and 30th, 10:00 to 18:00 at the David InterContinental Hotel in Tel Aviv.


Grisha Alroi-Arloser, Managing Director of AHK Israel said: "In 2015 we are celebrating something in Tel Aviv that we could not have imagined to be possible a few decades ago – economic cooperation between Israel and Germany. The exhibition will be a platform for successful cooperation and exchanges of breakthrough technologies, as well as a possibility to lead to even closer economic ties between the two countries. I invite everyone to come and be impressed by the exhibition and participate in the events planned in order for us all to be proud of the long road that the two countries have come along in the past fifty years."


For more information, visit http://madeingermany.israel.ahk.de/


The German-Israeli Chamber of Industry and Commerce (AHK Israel) is part of a worldwide network of German chambers of commerce holding 130 offices in 90 countries. The chamber promotes business relationships, joint ventures and collaborations in research in Israel and Germany. Visit the website http://israel.ahk.de/ for more information.


The Israeli-German Economic Association (DIW) is a sister of the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, which advises and assists Israeli companies in creating contacts with German companies and in realizing business plans in Germany.

 

The association's website is http://www.diw.de/

 

 Photo Credit  Lufthansa  3 november 1968

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The foreign ministry and the football association hosted premier diplomatic representative of the countries that qualified for the U-19 Euro Finals tournament

 

Europe's Vice President from the Office of Foreign Mr Affairs Aviv Shir-On and the CEO of the Israeli Football Union Rotem Kemer hosted today (22/6) the consulate representatives of the seven countries that have entered the prestigious finals stage of the Women's U-19 Euro Finals tournament that will take place in Israel during the 15-27 of July.

 

During the meeting that took place at the herods Hotel in Tel Aviv, Kemer and Shir-On shared with the foreign ambassadors Israel's preparations for the tournament, on a local and international level. The tournament will be broadcast live to dozens of countries worldwide and will draw to its Israeli venues soccer enthusiasts, scouts and international soccer personalities from EUFA organization.

 

Before those in attendance enjoyed the lunch prepared by Herods hotel’s Chef, Golan Israel.

 

 

Photo Subtitles:
Mr Rob Dixon, Deputy Head Of Mission of the British Embassy, the guest of honor at a diplomatic event hosted by the Israeli Football Association and the Office of Foreign Affairs in anticipation of the Women's U19 Euro Finals tournament held in Israel during the month of July 2015

Photos:
Aviv Hofi, courtesy of Football Union.

 

 

 

'Tel Aviv Loves all Genders'

Tel Aviv’s Largest Ever Pride Festival Attracted a Record 180,000 Participants from Israel and Around the World

 

The biggest-ever Tel Aviv Pride Festival took place over the last week with the participation of over 180,000 people from Israel and abroad. The parade, held under the theme "Tel Aviv Loves All Genders" marks the City’s commitment of support to the Transgender community, and was launched by the Mayor of Tel Aviv-Yafo, Mr. Ron Huldai, marking the peak of a week of events.

 

Guest of honor, Conchita Wurst, performed ‘Rise Like a Phoenix’ - her winning song from the Eurovision Contest 2014 - on stage in front of tens of thousands.

 

Tel Aviv’s 17th Pride Parade was concluded over the weekend with its largest parade to-date. 100,000 people marched together under the slogan “Tel Aviv Loves All Genders” in a statement of love and support. In the past year, the transgender community has had many significant achievments, both juridical, in parliament and in the public arena with positive change to the conditions of transgender people in army service and the establishment of two new organizations dedicated to the needs of the transgender community, but there is still much progress to be made. Positioning the transgender community at the forefront of Tel Aviv Pride 2015 sends a clear message that the city supports this vulnerable community, promotes its visability, shows support for its achievenments and strengthens its members.

 

Tel Aviv, whose Pride Parade is a central event on the global gay calendar, has in recent years, become one of the world's leading and most famous gay tourist destinations, thanks to its tolerant atmosphere, warm weather (300 days of sun a year), famous culinary scene and world-leading nightlife scene. GayCities.com ranked Tel Aviv as the "World's Best Gay Tourism Destination", Lonely Planet considers Tel Aviv one of the world's Top 10 hedonistic city breaks and CNN ranked the city as 'one of the 10 best gay honeymoon hotspots'. The estimated 30,000 international visitors to the parade are expected to spend 40% more than other tourist demographics, staying an average of 3.5 nights in the city.

 

At the opening of the Parade, the Mayor of Tel Aviv-Yafo, Mr. Ron Huldai said: "To the proud people of Tel Aviv, I am happy to stand before you and open this city's seventeenth Gay Pride Parade. We have been through a lot in the past seventeen years. We reached a different reality together in Tel Aviv and also throughout Israel. I want to say to all politicians that we have a lot of legislation to pass in order to promote and receive the LGBT community in Israel as a whole."

 

For more information please refer to the website at: http://www.visit-tel-aviv.com/gayvibe

 

 Photos credit  Guy Yechiely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arab Museum of Contemporary Art in Sakhnin, will open on 17th of June 2015. The museum holds a collection of 200 contemporary international works of art. The museum is a cooperative initiative of Belu-Simion Fainaru and Avital Bar-Shay, initiators and directors of the museum as well as initiators and curators of the Mediterranean Biennale in Sakhnin together with the Municipality of Sakhnin, thereby creating a new reality of cooperation between Jews and Arabs.

 

AMOCA, the Arab Museum of Contemporary Art, Sakhnin, is the first museum of its kind to be established in an Arab city in Israel. For the first time in Israel an Arab museum of contemporary art will open and present exhibitions of leading artists from Israel and the world. The goal of the museum is to exhibit local and international contemporary art in order to promote peace and dialogue by means of art activities, mutual confidence building between neighbors and a strengthening of values of equality and mutuality leading toward the creation of an infrastructure for human dialogue and coexistence between communities and cultures in conflict. Belu-Simion Fainaru and Avital Bar-Shay, the initiators and directors of the museum, hope that through the intervention of art controversies could be bridged with the emphasis on multiculturalism, art creativity and human dignity as well as vision and hope for coexistence and a better future.

 

AMOCA, the Arab Museum of Contemporary Art , Sakhnin, is presently hosted in the Bet Netufa Association of Cities – Environmental Center. The aim of AMOCA is to enhance the dimension of mobility, to expose the works of art of the local and the world's best artists to people in various regions of the Galilee and the periphery, and to stay in places that are not normally exposed to contemporary art exhibitions. AMOCA, the Arab Museum of Contemporary Art, opens its gates in Sakhnin with the aim of making contemporary art accessible to the Arab and Jewish population living in the region through the display of art in direct contact with the people and in co-operation with them, art that creates contacts in the local and international dimensions. The vision of AMOCA is to create dialogue, meeting and co-operation between Jews and Arabs by means of contemporary art in change-generating projects with the aim of creating a platform for building mutual trust and resolution of disputes in alternative ways. In a likewise outlook, a center for conflict resolution and management, "Beyt al-Sulah", has been set up in the place in order to enable a dialogue and to arrive at solutions and agreements between the sides. This incorporation of AMOCA, the Arab Museum of Contemporary Art, with the Conflict Settlement Center is an expression of the desire to create co-operative activity based on the need to accept the other while increasing awareness of alternative approaches to dialogue and agreement. Fainaru and Bar-Shay conceived the vision of the museum after having launched the Second Mediterranean Biennale in Sakhnin in the previous year. The museum will open this June thanks to the cooperation of the Mayor of Saknin, Mazen Ghanaim, and the Sakhnin Municipality.

 

The opening exhibition of the museum is titled HIWAR. The word HIWAR in Arabic has two main definitions: either to describe a calm conversation between two or more people, or (especially in a political or conflict context) to describe a process by which two or more parties engage in a conversation that is calm and free from animosity with the aim of reaching an agreement on a certain issue. These two definitions are exactly the same ones found in dictionaries to define the English word “dialogue.” HIWAR , dialogue is a process that allows people, usually in small groups, to share their perspectives and experiences with one another about difficult issues. “HIWAR” , dialogue is not about winning an argument or coming to an agreement but about understanding and learning. “HIWAR” , dialogue dispels stereotypes, builds trust and enables people to be open to perspectives that are very different from their own. Dialogue can, and often does, lead to both personal and collaborative action. HIWAR, dialogue is a spiritual, transformative journey of understanding the other.

 

The list of artists exhibiting includes:


Adel Abdessemed, Marina Abramović, Larry Abramson, Anna Andres, Abir Athalla, Asad Azi, Mahmud Badarnah, Avital Bar-Shay, Raed Bawayah, Matei Bejeranu, Nathalie Mba Bikoro, Bashir Borlakov, Daniel Buren, Thorsten Brinkmann, Barbara Eichhorn, Mounir Fatmi, Belu-Simion Fainaru,Mekhitar Garabedian,Jeanno Gaussi,Moshe Gershuni,Maïmouna Patrizia Guerresi,Rawan Ismail,Nidal Jabarin,Huda Jamal,Muhammad Said Kallash,Dani Karavan,Jannis Kounellis,Mehdi-Georges Lahlou,Almagul Menlibayeva,Bohtaina Abu Milhem,Shirin Neshat,Herman Nitsch,Zohdy Qadry,Anahita Razmi,Valentin Ruhry Angelika Sher,Eva Shlegel ,Cengiz Tekin,Jesica Vaturi,Maria Vedder,Johannes Vogl,Micha Ullman,David Wakstain,Runi Zarawi

 

At the opening, the museum will launch an artists hosting program that will encourage Israeli and international artists to come and stay at the place in order to create an interchange of experiences and cultures as well as to run art workshops and community creativities. Furthermore, the museum will launch a community educational program. The Mediterranean Biennale events will continue to be held and will be incorporated in the art program of the museum. Further details regarding the museum and the exhibition HIWAR as well as an invitation to tour the museum will be announced later.


Address: Dohaa st. 100, near the Dohaa stadium, Sakhnin. (hosted in the Bet Netufa Association of Cities – Environmental Center)


Opening hours: Sunday – Thursday 10 am- 4pm (during the Ramadan 18th of June until 20th of July the museum will be open Sunday – Thursday 10 am- 2pm
website: MEDITERRANEANBIENNALE.COM

 

 

 

 Photos provided by  Arab Museum of Contemporary Art in Sakhnin

 

 

 

 

 

Guitar Master Baldi Olier, leading up to a series of concerts in Europe as Israel's representative in events and festivals, will appear in a farewell presentation in Flamenco Style: "Spanish Taberna".


TheShow will take place on June 10, 2015, at 9 pm, in the coffee hall of the Cameri Theater, located at 30 Leonardo da Vinci St., Tel-Aviv.


"Spanish Taberna" – a unique festive concert will be presented by the Guitar Master Baldi Olier before his trip to Europe, where he will represent Israel in events and festivals, and the launching of his new musical album "Restos De Flamenco" (Flamenco Remnants).


The concert belongs to the World Music category, stressing Flamenco Music, and includes a great variety of musical contents and styles: Flamenco, Latin and Gipsy, with Mediterranean motifs and fascinating Flamenco dancing in a variety of styles.


Additional participants in the presentation:


Barak Olier – accompanying guitarist.
Ayelet Shachar – Flamenco dancer from the Israeli Flamenco Company.


Baldi Olier will appear in Europe in the following presentations:


June 19, 2015 – San Marino Festival in Italy, celebrating Israel's independence.


June 20-21, 2015 – "Expo" exhibition in the Israeli stand in Milan.


June 23, 2015 – "Suma Flamenca" festival in Madrid.


July 13, 2015 – "Henley" festival in London, which will take place with a royal flotilla on the Thames river.


July 15, 2015 – Concert in JW3 Hall in London.


Baldi Olier, one of the greatest and most important guitar players in Israel, has launched up to now 15 guitar playing albums of his creation with different musical ensembles. His 15th album is dedicated to the "Restos De Flamenco" style.

This album contains 8 Flamenco pieces that Baldi Olier composed and played.


The entrance fee to the show on June 10, 2015, at 9 pm, is 100 NIS.


More info Phone No.: 03-6060960.

 

 www.olier.co.il

 

 Photo by Barak Olier

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Research Will be Presented at a Joint Symposium of the Israel Antiquities Authority  and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem:

 

The Earliest Known Depiction of a Music Scene in the Archaeological Research of Israel was Discovered

 

The scene, appearing on a seal impression from 5,000 years ago, portrays a rite in a “sacred marriage” ceremony between the king and a goddess in Mesopotamia that included music and dancing, a banquet, a meeting between the king and the goddess and their sexual union

 

The most ancient music scene known in the research of Israel appears on a rare 5,000 year old cylinder seal impression from the Early Bronze Age. So believe archaeologists Dr. Yitzhak Paz, Dr. Ianir Milevski and Nimrod Getzov of the Israel Antiquities Authority, who will present their new findings in a symposium entitled "Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll" on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

The impression, which was found in the 1970's at the Bet Ha-‘Emeq antiquities site during an archaeological survey conducted in the Western Galilee by Dr. Rafi Frankel, was made using a cylinder seal rolled along the surface of the clay before it was fired, forming a series of repeating designs. The scene depicted on the seal impression includes three female figures, two standing and one sitting. The seated figure is playing an instrument that appears to be a lyre – a musical instrument known from the ancient world.

 

According to the researchers, "It seems that the rare seal impression, which appeared on a fragment of a large storage vessel (pithos), sheds light on the symbolic-ritualistic world of the Early Bronze Age inhabitants in Israel. The importance of the scene lies in the possible symbolic context, it being part of a complex ritual known in Mesopotamia as the 'sacred marriage'. In this ceremony a symbolic union took place between the king and a goddess (actually represented by a priestess). The ceremony included several rites: music and dancing, a banquet, a meeting between the king and the goddess and an act of sexual congress between them. Recently, Professor Pierre de Miroschedji of the CNRS suggested that many of the seal impressions from the Early Bronze Age portray the sacred marriage rite.

 

The seal impression presented reflects the musical part connected to this ceremony. According to the researchers, “This is the first time it is definitely possible to identify a figure playing an instrument on a seal impression from the third millennium BCE. This is when most of the ‘cultic’ impressions from Israel depict dancing figures or the feasting scene in which the female and male figures are shown facing each other, in the rite just before their sexual encounter”.

 

The symposium, on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, will be conducted mainly in Hebrew (2 lectures will be given in English) and will be open to the public, free of charge. The public is invited.


Click here to download pictures and the symposium program.


1. A picture of a fragment of the cylinder seal impression that was found at the Bet Ha-‘Emeq antiquities site on which a music scene is depicted. Photographic credit: Nimrod Getzov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

2. A reconstruction of the music scene. Prepared by Nimrod Getzov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

3. A reconstruction of the various ceremonial rites as reflected by different fragments of impressions found in Israel and Jordan. Prepared by Nimrod Getzov, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Masada Opera Festival at the Dead Sea June 2015 Two Weekends, with Two Huge Productions at the Foot of Masada:
"Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini Conducted by Daniel Oren
"Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff Conducted by James Judd 

Hundreds of Participants, International Cast of Soloists, Choirs, Orchestra, Dancers and Actors In Israel's Largest Cultural and Tourism Event

 

The Israeli Opera, which is celebrating its 30th season this year, will hold the fifth Masada Opera Festival – the largest international cultural event in Israel – presenting two masterpieces: "Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini and "Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff.
The festival will take place at the foot of Masada, in the Tamar Regional Council, over two weekends in June: June 4-6 and June 11-13. There will be four performances of "Tosca" and two performances of "Carmina Burana."


Hanna Munitz, Israeli Opera General Director: "Every year I remind myself that it all started with a fantastic dream that was hard to believe would come true… Now our festival takes shape for the fifth year, and this time we are privileged to stage not one, but two huge productions that are totally different from each other, on the same gigantic stage that is rebuilt every year especially for the Opera Festival at the foot of Masada.


The Masada Opera Festival has succeeded since its inauguration in 2010 to become one of the leading international opera festivals in the world and has positioned the Israeli Opera as an important and significant international opera house"
"Tosca" at the foot of Masada, which will be conducted by the Israeli Opera's music director Maestro Daniel Oren, one of the greatest conductors in the world for Italian operas, and directed by Nicolas Joel, one of the most senior opera directors in the world, will provide viewers with a unique experience for this production, set against the backdrop of desert scenery,and accompanied by lighting effects on Mount Masada. Daniel Oren meticulously selected a team of international and Israeli soloists, including Bulgarian soprano Svetla Vassileva in the role of Tosca, Italian tenor Fabio Sartori together with Argentinian tenor Gustavo Porta in the role of Cavaradossi, American baritone Scott Hendricks together with Russian baritone Sergei Murzaev as Scarpia, Italian bass Carlo Striuli as Angelotti, along with Israeli Opera soloists, including Vladimir Braun as the Sacristan, Joseph Aridan as Spoletta, Oded Reich as Sciarrone, Noah Briger as the Jailer and others. Also participating are the Israeli Opera Chorus conducted by Eitan Schmeisser, the Moran Children Choir and the Opera orchestra – the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion.


"Carmina Burana," the stirring creation by Carl Orff, will also take on a special character in a new fully staged production that is all spectacular colors and stylistic pyrotechnics, with the participation of hundreds of artists conducted by James Judd and directed by Michal Znaniecki, with a cast of hundreds of singers, musicians, dancers and actors. The soloists include soprano Alla Vasilevitsky, countertenor Alon Harari, and Italian baritone Enrico Maria Marabelli. Also participating are the Israeli Opera choir, the Ankor Children's Choir and the Opera orchestra – the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion.


These productions of the Opera Festival at the foot of Masada are the largest and most complex ever held in Israel, and will employ 2,500 people in addition to 700 participants and operations crews.


The operas will be performed at the foot of Masada, with Mount Masada illuminated by special artistic lighting; the infrastructures include a stage measuring 35 meters deep and 64 meters wide, bleachers with some 6,500 comfortable seats, parking areas for hundreds of buses and private vehicles, media and Internet infrastructures, and a reception area featuring thousands of seats and some 160 ecological restrooms.


"Tosca" will be performed on two Thursdays, June 4 and 11, and on two Saturdays, June 6 and 13, at 21:30 (9:30 PM).


"Carmina Burana" will be performed on two Fridays, June 5 and 12, at 22:00 (10:00 PM).


The Masada Opera Festival is being produced in partnership with Arkia Airlines, the Tamar Regional Council, the Ministry of Tourism, the Dead Sea Hotel Association and Bimot. This year too, Arkia is providing the primary commercial sponsorship for the festival (for the third year) and will exclusively market the vacation packages (tickets + lodging) to the Israeli public for the Masada Opera Festival events. As part of the collaboration between the Opera and Arkia, both entities have worked to set fair prices for lodging at the Dead Sea hotels.


Bimot will sell individual tickets.


The sale of vacation packages for overseas tourists will be handled by Eshet Tours and Amiel Tours.


The Ministry of Tourism has been leading the marketing of the Opera Festival around the world since its inception. Each year, the Festival brings thousands of tourists to Israel and helps brand Israel as a country with cultural richness, offering international events that strengthen the economy and contribute to employment. As part of the support for marketing the festival, the Ministry of Tourism will host dozens of journalists from Europe, who will arrive to cover the Masada Opera Festival and enjoy a unique cultural experience.


Dr. Uzi Landau, Minister of Tourism: "The Masada Opera Festival, in the Judean Desert, near the shores of the Dead Sea, will take place for the fifth time, and this is a source of great pride, considering the size and scope of such a cultural event, and in such a setting. Last year the Festival attracted thousands of tourists, opera lovers who came in order to enjoy the unique production at the foot of the ancient fortress of courage, and thus were exposed to the charms of the music, the history, and nature in Israel. Events and performances of this type are an important vehicle for positioning Israel as an attraction for culture-loving tourists, combining ancient beauty with the modern world, and of course, for increasing the volume of incoming tourism. Therefore, the Ministry of Tourism attaches great importance to investing in such international cultural events throughout the year."


Dov Litvinoff, Head of the Tamar Regional Council: "The Tamar Regional Council is happy to host the Opera at Masada year after year. The tremendous success we have witnessed over the last four years has led us to create a doubly greater challenge – the concurrent production of two different opera performances. This is a tremendous and unique experience that captivates the audience when the orchestra begins playing thunderously, the rainbow of lighting colors blends in with Mount Masada, and the opera singers take flight. I invite you, all the residents of Israel and citizens of the world, of all ages, to come this year and enjoy the exceptional combination in which the soprano's voice shakes the desert silence, under the stars in Mother Nature's cultural hall."

 

"Tosca" at the foot of Masada:

Giacomo Puccini
Libretto: Luigi Illica
Conductor: Daniel Oren
Director: Nicolas Joel
Set Designer: Emanuelle Favre
Costume Designer: Katia Duflot
Lighting Designer: Vinicio Cheli
The Opera Orchestra – The Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion
The Israeli Opera Choir
The Moran Choir

Thursday, 4 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Saturday, 6 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Thursday, 11 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Saturday, 13 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
All performances at 21:30 (9:30 PM)

New Production | Sung in Italian – Surtitles Projected in Hebrew and English
Length of Performance: approximately three hours
Ticket Prices: NIS 400, 500, 750, 950, 1300

 

"Carmina Burana"
Carl Orff
Conductor: James Judd
Director: Michal Znaniecki
Set Designer: Luigi Scoglio
Costume Designer: Magdalena Dabrowska
Lighting and Video Designer: Bogumil Palewicz

The Opera Orchestra – The Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion
The Israeli Opera Choir
The Ankor Choir
New Production | Sung in Latin – Surtitles Projected in Hebrew and English
Length of Performance: approximately one hour

Friday, 5 June 2015 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Friday, 12 June 2015 _ 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Both performances at 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Ticket Prices: NIS 300, 440, 660, 825, 1100

 

To order tickets and packages:     Bimot *6226         Arkia *5758

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

A Las Vegas-style musical trip down memory lane, “Unforgettable” has taken Israel by storm, attracting standing room only crowds and garnering rave reviews in the Israeli media. Due to popular demand, “Unforgettable” has added several more shows to its late Spring, early Summer performance schedule (see below).


“Unforgettable” intersperses innovative video art of the stars of yesteryear with LIVE performances of their smash hit songs performed by three multi-talented internationally acclaimed singers, Zac Hilon (who has opened for superstar band ‘Duran, Duran’ and appeared on the Las Vegas Strip), Stella Yudko, and Charles Garrett. The trio is bolstered by a live 8-piece band, bopping back-up vocalists, and eye-popping costumes.


“Unforgettable’s” 90 minute flashy musical tour de force highlights the chartbusters who influenced and revolutionized the American & British music scene during the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s including: Frank, Sinatra, Elvis Presley, Tom Jones, Ray Charles, Nat King Cole, The Temptations, Jay Black & the Americans, Shirley Bassey and many more…


This inspiring and romantic show has energized audiences, who have no qualms about letting their hair down by singing and swooning to the musical repertoire.


A brief impression of the show can be seen in video clips at the following link:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=trnQ_JNErLQ.

 

Hilon, who attracted top name celebrities such as Sheena (007-“For Your Eyes Only”) Easton, Engelbert Humperdinck and Debbie Reynolds to his shows in Vegas, revealed the secret to “Unforgettable’s” success. “There is a hunger in the marketplace for these type of musical nostalgia experiences,” he said. “In Israel and other countries, musical stars from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s. ranging from Engelbert Humperdinck and Paul Anka to Dionne Warwick and Cliff Richard, are still selling out their concerts. I hear today’s teens singing songs from the Beatles and Elvis, as if they were contemporary artists. This type of pop music is timeless and that’s the ultimate attraction.”

 

Upcoming ‘Unforgettable’ Performances:

· May 26-Cultural Center-Kfar Saba
· May 30- Givatayim Theater
· June 6-Hof HaCarmel Cultural Center-Haifa
· June 24-Cinema City-Rishon Lezion

 

One can purchase tickets, 95 shekels per ticket, via “Le’an” *8780


For Hof HaCarmel performance only, call Barak Tickets at 04-837-7777


Reduced ticket rates for groups and organizations

 

 

  Photos  :Nicole De Castro

 

 

 

  

President Rivlin addresses Jerusalem Day commemorations

 

President Reuven Rivlin, spoke this evening (Sunday) at the state ceremony commemorating the reunification of Jerusalem, held on Ammunition Hill, the site of a crucial battle in the Six Day War of 1967, in which Israel reunified Jerusalem.

 

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat also spoke at the ceremony which was also attended by Deputy Speaker of the Knesset Nachman Shai and Vice President of the Supreme Court Justice Elyakim Rubinstein. During the ceremony Rochelle Sivan Hadari, the widow of the late Private Neta Hadari, lit the memorial torch. Five torches were carried by Central Command Commander Maj. Gen. Roni Numa, representatives of the Jerusalem Brigade, Harel Brigade Commander Col. Haggai Amar, Paratrooper Brigade Commander Col. Guy Levy, 102 Squadron Commander Lt. Col. Ido.

 

The President stated, "We are now fortunate to see the growth and prosperity of Jerusalem – a state capital with bustling streets filled with young men and women, boys and girls. A capital with a vibrant and developed civil society, seminaries that cater to the ultra-Orthodox (Haredi), the secular and the traditional, and arts and culture that is unique, and has all sprung up from the unique human fabric."

 

The President added, "As a Jerusalemite and a lover of the city, I ask today about peace in my united Jerusalem, which stands above all bargaining. My Jerusalem is Zion and Zionism, and yet it does not belong only to its history it belongs first and foremost to its people, and to all its residents: secular, religious and Haredi, Arabs and Jews. And in my united Jerusalem there is west and there is an east and there are no secondary sons, there are no secondary Jerusalemites."

 

The President stressed the responsibility arising from the consolidation of the city in light of the differences between eastern and western Jerusalem and said, "We are confronting rightly, justly, and without hesitation, criticism over our right to be sovereign in a united Jerusalem. I fear that we ourselves have not yet looked frankly at the meaning of our sovereignty in the city. When we look today at the huge disparities between the eastern part of the city and the western part, we have to tell ourselves honestly - we completed the physical unification of the city, but the task of unifying the city's social and economic aspects have barely begun. While western Jerusalem is enjoying the momentum of development and impressive growth, the eastern part of the city is in disrepair and neglect. It needs to be said that today, after years of viewing eastern Jerusalem and its people as transparent, groundbreaking steps are currently being taken in the fields of education, housing and infrastructure, and for that we need to congratulate the Mayor. However, there is much more to be done. This is a national mission which needs to be placed squarely on the shoulders of the incoming government. The events of the past few months including the phenomenon of stone-throwing by roaming children only reinforced the understanding that security involves welfare. In recent months Jerusalem has witnessed bloody, brutal murderous terrorist attacks. We will continue to fight against terrorism without hesitation and without fear. With that in mind, the ticking bomb that is the welfare of the residents of eastern Jerusalem will not be able to be dismantled by police and security forces alone. It would be foolish and wrong to think so. And above all it would be negligent not address the issues in time."

 

The President added that, "Sovereignty entails responsibility. Sovereignty involves policy. Sovereignty involves determination. The reunification of Jerusalem in practice, in terms of narrowing the pressing gap between its eastern and western parts is a task that all lovers of Jerusalem, from the Right and Left alike, have to agree upon and strive to achieve. Only thus, can we ask for peace in Jerusalem. Jerusalem is given to us in trust. We must bear the heavy responsibility for the peace of the city's inhabitants here, and for the peace of those who believe in the city from around the world. May we know to ask for city's well-being as a united Jerusalem, for the sake the city's lovers, its people and all it's believers."

 

 

 

 

 

Jerusalem, capital of Israel, divided during the 1948 War of Independence, was reunited in June 1967. On May 17, 2015 (28 Iyyar) Israel celebrates Jerusalem Day, marking the reunification of the nation's capital.

 

Since the time of King David, except for the 19 years between 1948 and 1967, there has always been a Jewish presence in the ancient city of Jerusalem, the capital of Israel. From 1948 until 1967, the western part of the city was in Israeli hands, while the ancient, eastern part - apart from a small Israeli enclave on Mount Scopus - was under Jordanian control.

 

Jerusalem, divided during the 1948 War of Independence, was reunited in June 1967.

"Peace has now returned with our forces in control of all the city and its environs. You may rest assured that no harm whatsoever shall come to the places sacred to all religions. I have requested the Minister of Religious Affairs to get in touch with the religious leaders in the Old City in order to ensure regular contact between them and our forces, so as to make certain that the former may continue their spiritual activities unhindered."

 

- Prime Minister Levi Eshkol, June 7, 1967

 

Brief history of Jerusalem


King David made Jerusalem the capital of his kingdom and the religious center of the Jewish people in 1003 BCE. Some forty years later, his son Solomon built the Temple (the religious and national center of the people of Israel) and transformed the city into the prosperous capital of an empire extending from the Euphrates to Egypt.

 

Exiled by Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar in 586 BCE, who conquered Jerusalem and destroyed the Temple, the Jews were allowed to return and rebuild the city and the Temple some 50 years later by the Persian King Cyrus.

 

Alexander the Great conquered Jerusalem in 332 BCE. The later desecration of the Temple and attempts to suppress Jewish religious identity under the Seleucid ruler Antiochus IV resulted in a revolt led by Judah Maccabbee, who rededicated the Temple (164 BCE) and re-established Jewish independence under the Hasmonean dynasty.

 

A century later, Pompey imposed Roman rule on Jerusalem. King Herod, installed as ruler of Judah by the Romans (37 - 4 BCE), established cultural institutions in Jerusalem, erected magnificent public buildings and refashioned the Temple into an edifice of splendor.

 

Jewish revolt against Rome broke out in 66 CE, as Roman rule after Herod's death became increasingly oppressive. In 70 CE, Roman legions under Titus conquered the city and destroyed the Temple. Jewish independence was briefly restored during the Bar Kochba revolt (132-135), but again the Romans prevailed. Jews were forbidden to enter the city, renamed Aelia Capitolina.

 

After Byzantine conquest of the city (313), Jerusalem was transformed into a Christian center under Emperor Constantine, with the Church of the Holy Sepulcher the first of many grandiose structures built in the city.

 

Muslim armies invaded the country in 634, and four years later Caliph Omar captured Jerusalem. Only during the reign of Abdul Malik, who built the Dome of the Rock (691), did Jerusalem briefly become the seat of a caliph.

 

The Crusaders conquered Jerusalem in 1099, massacred its Jewish and Muslim inhabitants, and established the city as the capital of the Crusader Kingdom. Synagogues were destroyed, old churches were rebuilt and many mosques were turned into Christian shrines. Crusader rule over Jerusalem ended in 1187, when the city fell to Saladin.

 

In 1247 Jerusalem fell once more to Egypt, now ruled by the Mamluks, until the conquest by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Suleiman the Magnificent rebuilt the city walls (1537). After his death, the central authorities in Constantinople took little interest in Jerusalem and the city declined.

 

Jerusalem began to thrive once more in the latter half of the 19th century. Growing numbers of Jews returning to their land, waning Ottoman power and revitalized European interest in the Holy Land led to renewed development of Jerusalem.

 

The British army led by General Allenby conquered Jerusalem in 1917. From 1922 to 1948, Jerusalem was the administrative seat of the British authorities in the Land of Israel (Palestine), which had been entrusted to Great Britain by the League of Nations.

 

Division and reunification

 

Upon termination of the British Mandate on May 14, 1948, and in accordance with the UN resolution of November 29, 1947, Israel proclaimed its independence, with Jerusalem as its capital. Opposing its establishment, the Arab countries launched an all-out assault on the new state, resulting in the 1948-49 War of Independence. The armistice lines drawn at the end of the war divided Jerusalem into two, with Jordan occupying the Old City and areas to the north and south, and Israel retaining the western and southern parts of the city.

 

When the Six-Day War broke out in June 1967, Israel contacted Jordan through the U.N. as well as the American Embassy, and made it clear that if Jordan refrained from attacking Israel, Israel would not attack Jordan. Nevertheless, the Jordanians attacked west Jerusalem and occupied the former High Commissioner's building. Following heavy fighting, the IDF recovered the compound and removed the Jordanian army from east Jerusalem, resulting in the reunification of the city.

 

From the IDF website:


"The eagerly awaited command to take the Old City was given at sunrise on the third day of the war, 7 June 1967. The Command assigned this task to the paratroopers, who started with an attack on the Augusta-Victoria hills and the Mount of Olives, overlooking the Old City. After firing in the direction of the breakthrough path, the Lions Gate, the force from the east advanced forward very quickly and broke through into the Old City. The paratroopers ran towards the Dome of the Rock, located next to the last remains of the Temple, the Western Wall, where, in the presence of the sector commander and the deputy head of the armed services, General Rabbi Shlomo Goren, the chief chaplain of the IDF blew a long blow on the rams horn, announcing the release of the Western Wall and the Old City of Jerusalem. Jerusalem, the divided and split capital of Israel, was reunited."

 

After the liberation of the city by the IDF, the walls dividing the city were torn down. Three weeks later, the Knesset enacted legislation unifying the city and extending Israeli sovereignty over the eastern part of the city.

  

The reunification of the city was also a fundamental moment in the history of religious tolerance, opening the city of Jerusalem to worshippers of all faiths, permitting Jews to return to the Western Wall and other holy sites, and allowing Israeli Muslims and Christians to visit those sacred places in eastern Jerusalem from which they too had been barred since 1948.

 

One year later, in 1968, it was decided that the day marking the liberation and reunification of Jerusalem - 28 Iyar according to the Jewish lunar calendar - would be national holiday in Israel. On Jerusalem Day we celebrate the reunification of the city and the Jewish people's connection with Jerusalem throughout the ages.

 

  Photo captions (June 7, 1967):

1. Aerial view of Mosque of Omar and Western Wall, Old City of Jerusalem (GPO/Ilan Bruner)
2. Israeli troops with armored car in front of Lions Gatd in the Old City of Jerusalem (GPO/Ilan Bruner)
3. IDF Chief of Staff Yitzhak Rabin invites Defense Minister Moshe Dayan to the Western Wall (GPO/Ilan Bruner)
4. IDF Chief Chaplain Rabbi Shlomo Goren carrying a Torah scroll at the Western Wall (GPO/Eli Landau)

 

 

 

 

 

The Dan David Prize was awarded to six world renowned laureates this evening at Tel Aviv University

 

 Past: Retrieving the Past: Historians and their Sources:

Prof. Peter R. Brown and Prof. Alessandro Portelli

Present: The Information Revolution
Mr. Jimmy Wales

Future: Bioinformatics
Dr. Cyrus Chothia, Prof. David Haussler and Prof. Michael S. Waterman

 

The international Dan David prize, headquartered at Tel Aviv University, awarded its annual three $1 million prizes for outstanding achievements in the three time dimensions - Past, Present and Future. The Dan David Prize is named after the late Dan David, an international businessman and philanthropist. The prestigious Prize stands at the forefront of the world’s academic prizes.

 

The laureates, who donate 10% of their prize money towards 20 doctoral and postdoctoral scholarships, were honored at a ceremony in Tel Aviv University. The ceremony included speeches by Prof. Joseph Klafter, Prof. Benjamin Kedar, Mr. Jimmy Wales, Prof. Peter Brown, Prof. Michael Waterman and Mr. Ariel David as well as the presentations to the Dan David Prize Laureates 2015.

 

Ariel David, son of the late Dan David and a Board Member of the Dan David Foundation said, “This prize was founded 14 years ago by my father, and since his passing almost four years ago, it has carried on not just his name, but his spirit and personality. I wish that all of us, and especially this prize, will always retain this ability, which many of our laureates share, to always look at the world with wonder and endless curiosity.”

 

Mr. Jimmy Wales, Present Laureate for 2015, said during his acceptance speech, “When I launched Wikipedia 14 years ago, it was with a small community of a handful of people who believed in the idea – that we could come together and give the great gift to the world of a free encyclopedia for every single person on the planet, in their own language. And by free we didn't just mean free of cost, but also freely licensed – so that you are allowed to copy, modify, and redistribute our work freely.

Wikipedia is not just this one website, but a movement to share knowledge globally. I would like to thank the Dan David prize committee and all those who were involved in bringing me here, but more than that I’d like to thank everyone who has helped build the dream that is Wikipedia.”

 

Prof. Peter Brown representing the laureates in the Past dimension said, “It is a huge honor for myself and my friend Alessandro to receive such an award, it weighs upon us but with one thought, that one must remember that awards are really given not only to individuals but to generations. Historical revisionism has been in many ways the pride of our present generation. Every judge is judged the judgement according to truth as it should stand, has brought the presence of God among us and through our joint endeavors may this continue to be so.”

 

Prof. Michael Waterman representing the laureates in the Future dimension said, “The three awardees of the 2015 Dan David Future Prize, Cyrus Clothia, David Haussler and I, caught the transformation of biology from mostly a descriptive subject to an information-rich science. Our research was not then in any hot-topics category; we simply found fascinating problems that were irresistible and we were determined to pursue them. We greatly appreciate the Dan David Foundation and Tel Aviv University for choosing Bioinformatics as the area for the award and we are deeply honored to be the awardees.”

 

More events :

Monday 18th May 20:00 - Smolarz Auditorium, Tel Aviv University

Garage Geeks with Yossi Vardi and Mr. Jimmy Wales, Founder of Wikipedia
A lively and informal conversation between two leaders in the field of technology

Tuesday 19th May 20:00 - Mazeh 9, Tel Aviv-Jaffa Center for Young Adults, Tel Aviv

The Information Revolution and its effect on humanity – A Roundtable Discussion with the Dan David Prize Laureates
A round table discussion with all six Dan David Prize laureates and young adults in Tel Aviv on the effect of the information revolution on humanity looking at the past, present and future.

 

Photo credit Israel Hadari, Dan David Prize

 

 

 

 

 

 Israeli Embassy's Original Anime Wins International Awards!

 

The Embassy of Israel in Japan on May 6th has received 3 awards in the prestigious
"2015 WorldMediaFestival | TOURISM - Global Competition for Modern Media" in
Hamburg, Germany, for its original Anime series in Japan: "Israel, LIKE! Saki & Noriko
Sisters' Journey".

 

WorldMediaFestival | TOURISM honors and celebrates excellent solutions in Tourism
Film, Television, Web, Web TV and Print productions on an international scale. Awards
are given as a token for excellence in modern communications media and as
acknowledgement of the highest production standards in modern communication.

 

The Embassy of Israel has won 3 Silver Awards "recognizing successful achievement in
modern media communication" in the categories of Animation: Anime/Manga; PR: Cities,
Regions and Countries; Web: Government-to-Citizen. The series was produced in
Japan by MANGAnimation.

 

"Israel, Like!" is an original 7-episode series telling the story of the surprising journey of
2 Japanese sisters to Israel. This first of its kind project by a foreign embassy in Japan is
intended to introduce Israel to the Japanese public in a soft and non-political way,
focusing on the country's landscapes, cuisine, long tradition, vibrant culture and modern
lifestyle.

 

The series was launched last year on October 28, International Animation Day, as a
tribute to the wonderful Japanese pop-culture. The 7th and last episode was released on April 2015.
The series is available on the Embassy's Youtube, Facebook and Website:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFT22S9euEI&index=1&list=PLpWlKt7kk4pyc5fH2
9kSS3B-KLGKPlAR4

 

 

 

 https://youtu.be/o9CaP0X_tR0?list=PLpWlKt7kk4pyc5fH29kSS3B-KLGKPlAR4

 

 

 

Photo Ronen Medzini Head of Press & Information Section Embassy of Israel in Tokyo and members of the embassy received the awards.

 

Photo provided by  Embassy of Israel in Tokyo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The White City is Open to the Public in the 9th Year of Open House Tel Aviv

 

Open House Tel Aviv will take place over the weekend of May 14-15-16, 2015.


Similar to its eight predecessors, Open House Tel Aviv in 2015 will showcase Tel Aviv's most interesting homes, unique apartments and public buildings, all distinct in their architectural design. Architectural tours will be offered throughout the city – all free-of-charge and open to the public at large.

 

Open House Tel Aviv, which premiered in 2007, was inspired by the Open Houses held in London and in New York.


Open House Tel Aviv is a member in the Open House Worldwide organization:  www.openhouseworldwide.org  

 

Tel Aviv, which was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO thanks to its unique concentration of 4000 authentic Bauhaus buildings, is a city that possesses many other architectural qualities as well, in addition to its spirited urban energy. The combination between 4000 year-old Jaffa, the most ancient and constantly used Port City in the world, and Tel Aviv, a city founded in 1909 produces a unique urban fabric.


Open House Tel Aviv 2015 includes a rich program of tours, private and public buildings open to the public.


The event affords initial exposure to scores of young architects and designers whose projects are characterized by original thinking, innovative use of raw materials and/or a commitment to preserving the environment.

 

Approximately 113 events are planned for Open House Tel Aviv 2015 with a comprehensive schedule in English at  http://www.batim-il.org/ToursEng.aspx?batim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 19.5.2015 | Tuesday | 19:00 | Mamuta at Hansen   Gedalyahu Alon 14, Jerusalem

 

screening be in presence of the artists         free entrance

 

Tamara Moyzes and Shlomi Yaffe often refer in their works to contemporary cultural stereotypes and track down their traces in visual culture and in language. They point to the ways in which we perceive the others and discuss the meaning of civic belonging, often on the basis of their own experience of being foreigners.

 

The duo has based the project carried out as part of the museum residence on the pre-war Warsaw Yiddish theatres and on the features of the Israeli film genre called bourekas which was popular back in the 1960s and the 1970s.

 

Bourekas are expressive comedies with attributes of melodrama which focus on depicting relations between Mizrahi and Ashkenazi Jews. Influences of the Yiddish literature can be traced in them and the way in which the social features of the inhabitants of an East European shtetl were portrayed in these writings.

 

Tamara Moyzes and Shlomi Yaffe decided to rely on those two aesthetic foundations – literature and theatre, as well as films – to create a series of three short films using 3D face animation technologies (Vilem Novak, the artist-animator was responsible for this part). Huge format posters promoting the project in the Hollywood style appeared for a short time in Warsaw.

 

The films by this duo tell us the stories of life of contemporary Israeli figures, shown with the help of animated scenes. The protagonists of the films are: Yitzhak Rabin, Yigal Amir, Mordechai Vanunu, and Tali Fahima. These figures are played by the actors connected with the Ester Rachel Kamińska and Ida Kamińska State Jewish Theatre – Sylwia Nahaj, Henryk Rajfer, and Kobi Wietzner.

 

Historical events in which Rabin, Amir, Vanunu and Fahima participated are for Moyzes and Yaffe a point of departure to tackle the notion of stereotypes and identity myths. The issue is particularly important for the artists since they are representatives of the Mizrahim (Yaffe) and Ashkenazi (Moyzes) families.

 

The screenplays of the films contain other important references to the Bund and Zionism, as well as raise a question of today’s place of Jews in the world. The artists are interested in the fact that although the majority of the contemporary Jewish identity is connected with Israel today, old European cities still bear its traces.

 

They wanted to express it by referring to the non-existent history. The examples they have chosen were Warsaw Yiddish theatres. They hosted workshops devoted to that issue during which they created an interactive map depicting the history of the Warsaw Jewish theatres.

 

Answering the question “Where is the home of Jewish culture today?” they distributed posters inspired by the project and the artivism practice of the residents in selected locations where Yiddish theatres were once situated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kfar HaMaccabiah, 


The Omer, Lag Ba'Omer, Chol Hamoed, the Feast, the defeat and the festive spirit

 

Dear Friends,

As the title suggests, a dilemma arises intrinsically from the celebration of Lag Ba'Omer, linked with the offering and loss of the Omer, the liberating revolt against Rome, the victory and the tremendous, devastating final defeat.

 

The Omer is in fact a measure of volume / weight[1]. On the second day of Passover, the Children of Israel brought an omer of barley (the Passover harvest) as an offering to the Great Temple, an activity that connected the Jewish People with their spiritual center in Jerusalem, brought them closer to the Feast of Passover and set them on the road from Pessach to Shavuot, seven weeks later.

 

The destruction of the Beit HaMikdash, the Holy Temple, by the Roman general Titus and his legions[2], the joy sustained between Passover and Shavuot - similar to that of Chol Hamoed - was emptied of content. Only the memory of the Omer remained, but not the physical act of our People's offering. Without our Temple, the Omer became a counting of days, marking into our own times the relationship and mutual connection of Passover and Shavuot.

 

When the Roman Emperor Hadrian imposed Roman rule over the Jewish People, expelled from Jerusalem after the destruction of the Temple but still living in large regions of the Land of Israel, our People's situation worsened dramatically. The Omer, neutral in those days - without the joy of the offering in the Temple, but without further sadness - was stained with the blood, death and expulsion when Hadrian crushed the great Revolt of Bar-Kochba and Rabbi Akiva. Not only was Hadrian a mass-murderer of Jews in Eretz Yisrael and in other Jewish Diasporas within the Roman Empire, but also the enforcer of Jewish Exile (the 'Golah' or 'Galut') from the Land of Israel that endured for 18 centuries until the establishment of the Zionist Yishuv, and in 1948, the new State of Israel. From those terrible events in Antiquity and until today, the Omer marks a memory of Jewish pain and mourning - hence, the limitations on expressions of joy (for example, no weddings) that we observe during the seven weeks of the Omer.

 

Our Sages, however, enjoined us to one day of joy during the sadness of the Omer: Lag BaOmer, the 33rd day of the counting of the Omer, is a semi-festive day in the Hebrew calendar that recalls the glorious but all-too-brief triumph of the great Jewish military leader Bar-Kochba over the oppressive Legions of Rome that gave our People three years[3] of freedom and relief from the Roman yoke. Lag BaOmer celebrates victory in battle amidst the bitter loss of our war for liberty and an end to the plague that killed 24,000 students of Rabbi Akiba[4]. Our Sages offered this one sweet taste of honey in the bitter and sour reality we remember in Counting the Days of the Omer.

 

Why enjoin such happiness in a long period of sadness? Our Sages decreed that Lag BaOmer represents the promise of a grand future for the Jewish people: "Today, a victorious battle; tomorrow, final glorious victory: our national reconstruction". So true was this prophetic vision, that the happiest day in our contemporary Jewish calendar - Israel's Day of Independence, Yom Haatzmaut, celebrating restoration of our People's national life - occurs precisely during the Omer and confirming before Lag BaOmer the spirit of hope our Sages inserted at the forefront of our national horizon.

 

When we begin celebrating this Lag BaOmer, let's keep in mind that even in the leanest and most terrible reality, there must be some strong, desired, sustained wishes for happiness and a joyous future. The hope of national redemption intrinsic to Lag BaOmer gave our People the spirit that just two weeks ago facilitated our celebration of 67 years of regained independence. That hope sustained us, and our decisive action translated that spirit into national achievement.

 

May the lights of our bonfires of Lag BaOmer's glory illuminate our present and our promising future, and may we maintain the spirit of national continuity in this festival.

 

Lag BaOmer Sameach!!!
Chazak ve'ematz!!!

RABBI CARLOS A. TAPIERO
Deputy Director-General & Director of Education
Maccabi World Union

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Yad Vashem Exhibition to Open in Advance of Holocaust Remembrance Day

"Children in the Holocaust: Stars Without a Heaven"

 

"I was alone in the world, a boy alone in the world…but the light, there was always some sort of light…" Aharon Appelfeld, Holocaust survivor and author

 

On Sunday, April 12, 2015, Yad Vashem will open a new exhibition, "Children in the Holocaust: Stars Without a Heaven." The exhibition gives expression to the lives of the 1.5 million children who were murdered in the Holocaust, displaying the stories that remained of these children or the stories of the few who survived.

 

The opening of the exhibition will take place at Yad Vashem on Sunday, April 12, 2015 at 12:00 noon. Author and child survivor Aharon Appelfeld, Yad Vashem Chairman Avner Shalev, Director of the Museums Division at Yad Vashem and Exhibition Curator Yehudit Inbar will offer remarks at the event.

 

On display are items from Yad Vashem's artifacts, art and archives collections. In addition, art students from the Department of Ceramics and Glass Design of the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem created works from glass, porcelain and ceramics and students from the Department of Visual Communication Design of the Holon Institute of Technology-HIT created short animated clips, especially for the exhibition. These works were created to help illustrate the personal stories of the children where, due to the wartime circumstances of their childhood, little or no materials remained.

 

The exhibition is structured around eight major themes: play, study, friendship, Who Am I, work, home, family and rites of passage. As one enters the exhibition, a video installation in the lobby displays the world of children before the Holocaust. After entering the exhibition space, the subject matter moves on to the Holocaust itself. Exhibition Designer Chanan de Lange, of de Lange Studio, created a symbolic forest with the exhibition materials displayed inside "trees." Each one of these 33 trees contains a central story, with additional stories displayed on digital screens. There are also trees with more general topics such as "children's homes" or "youth movements." Designer Niv Moshe Ben-David created the "Children before the Holocaust," installation and edited the films screened on the trees.

 

Exhibition curator Yehudit Inbar said, "The Holocaust put an abrupt end to childhood. In many cases children became the breadwinners of the family and encouraged their parents to continue the desperate struggle for survival. Nevertheless, they remained children, and whenever they could, they played, laughed, wrote stories and drew pictures expressing their fears and hopes. The drawings, diaries, poems, music, letters, and toys offer a fascinating look at childhood in the shadow of the Holocaust. Their vitality, creativity, imagination, perceptiveness regarding interpersonal relationships, determination to survive and maintain their optimism despite the circumstances - all portray the depth of children's capabilities."

 

Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Martyrs’ and Heroes’ Remembrance Authority, was established in 1953. Located in Jerusalem, it is dedicated to Holocaust remembrance, documentation, research and education. www.yadvashem.org

 

 

 

 

Former President of Israel, Shimon Peres Opened Game of Thrones: The Exhibit in Tel Aviv, together with Matthew Gold, British Ambassador to Israel and accompanied by Ron Eilon, CEO of Yes

 

While sitting on the iron throne, the ninth President said:
"The Passover holiday exemplifies that we knew how to release ourselves from the tyranny of foreign thrones and liberate ourselves from slavery to freedom"


"Although in Game of Thrones there are many swordfights and beheadings, in the real world it is the duty of leaders to seek any way leading to peace."


 

Former President of Israel, Shimon Peres, opened Game of Thrones: The Exhibition which landed in Israel accompanied by Matthew Gold, British Ambassador to Israel. Following the historical visit of the Queen of England on the set of Game of Thrones, Peres and Gold came to the exhibit, accompanied by Ron Eilon, CEO of yes, and had a private tour before the exhibit opens to the public.

 

The exhibit, which just arrived in Tel Aviv after visiting the world's greatest capitals, showcases breathtaking items and specially made artifacts from the series that has enthralled millions of fans around the world and also in Israel.

 

The exhibit's curator, Elana Loewenthal from HBO®, came in especially from the United States, and guided Peres and Gold among the various items including costumes from the "Purple Wedding", dragon eggs, and royalty accessories, and invited Peres to sit on the Iron Throne. Peres greeted and said "The holiday of Passover exemplifies that we, the people of Israel, knew how to release ourselves from the tyranny of foreign thrones and liberate ourselves from slavery to freedom. I would like bless the children of Israel for Passover, and wish them to rest and enjoy the holiday with their families and have a happy and kosher holiday. Although in the world of cinema and on Game of Thrones there are many swordfights and beheadings, it is important to remember that in the real world we live in, it is the duty of leaders to seek any way leading to peace."

 

At the request of the Lehoshit Yad Association, Peres joined and hosted 17-year old Ben Yuval, an avid fan of the series, for whom the visit to the exhibit is a dream come true.


Ben was diagnosed with a hematological disease, Hyper IgM syndrome, when he was 5-years old and has been treated for the past 12 years by the Hematology department at Tel Hashomer.


He was brought to the exhibit with the help of the Lehoshit Yad Association, which helps thousands of children living with cancer and c.p.

 

 

 Photos Silvia G  Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo : Matzah and wine


Pesach lasts for seven days and is celebrated to commemorate the exodus from Egypt - one of the main stories in the history of the Jewish people and in western culture in general.

 

About Pesach


Pesach, or Passover, is a major holiday in Jewish tradition, and is one of the three pilgrimage holidays, along with Sukkot and Shavuot. These are the holidays on which the whole Jewish people would come to Jerusalem in ancient times, when the Holy Temple was there, and would offer animal and grain sacrifices. Since the destruction of the Temple, a few of the holiday traditions have been retained, without the pilgrimage and the sacrifices, and many new traditions have been added.

 

Pesach, which starts on the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan (usually in April), lasts for seven days and is celebrated to commemorate the exodus from Egypt - one of the main stories in the history of the Jewish people and in western culture in general. According to the Torah, the Israelites lived in Egypt, and were enslaved by the Egyptians. Moshe (Moses), an Israelite who grew up in the palace of Pharaoh, the king of Egypt, became a leader of the Israelites and asked Pharaoh to allow them to return to the Land of Israel. When Pharaoh refused, Moshe led a campaign that culminated in his people’s hurried departure from Egypt, toward the Sinai desert, where they lived for 40 years. According to Jewish tradition, during this long journey in the desert, led by Moshe and his brother Aharon, the Israelites became a united people as they prepared to conquer the Land of Israel.

 

Pesach is also called the holiday of Freedom, and this aspect of the holiday is emphasized in the rituals and prayers: the exodus from slavery to freedom symbolizes physical and spiritual redemption and man’s aspiration to be free.

 

Another important element of this holiday is family togetherness. On the eve of the holiday, called Seder night, due to the ceremonial Seder meal that is celebrated that evening, whole extended families gather around one table. It is also an important Jewish precept to invite others who have no family with whom to celebrate the holiday.

 

Another name for Pesach is the holiday of Unleavened Bread. The story of the exodus from Egypt relates that the Israelites left Egypt hurriedly and the dough they had prepared had no time to rise, so they baked it into matzah, unleavened bread. One of the important precepts of this holiday is the abstinence from eating leaven - any baked goods prepared with flour and allowed to rise, or prepared foods containing flour. Instead of bread, Jews eat matzah. Religious (and traditional) Jews observe this aspect of the holiday meticulously.

 

One more name for Pesach is the holiday of Spring, marking the season in which Pesach is celebrated.

 

The first day of the holiday, as well as the last day (which is known as the “second holiday”) are holy rest days, on which all productive work is forbidden. The intermediate days are called Chol ha-Mo’ed, and are part-holiday, part-regular days.

 

Holiday Customs

 

Pesach Seder ​Prohibition on eating leaven - Throughout the seven-day holiday, the prohibition against eating leaven - called chametz - is in effect, in commemoration of the matzah that the Israelites ate on their hurried journey out of Egypt. The prohibition includes all types of bread and baked goods made of flour dough, and also all types of pasta.

 

Eating matzah - Matzah is flat bread made from unrisen dough. Apart from during the ceremonial Seder meal, eating matzah is not compulsory, but for most Israeli families (religious and traditional alike) matzah is the accepted alternative to bread throughout the holiday.

 

Biur chametz - the eradication of leaven - In the weeks prior to Pesach, Jews customarily clean their homes thoroughly to ensure that not one crumb of chametz remains. Non-religious Jews often use this custom as an opportunity to “spring-clean” their homes and create a holiday atmosphere. The religious view this as a precept that must be strictly observed, and follow a special process to remove chametz even from their dishes and cooking utensils, or they use special dishes just for Pesach. On the night before the day on which Pesach begins, it is customary to search in all the corners of the house by candlelight, to make sure there are no crumbs anywhere. The State of Israel, as a representative of the Jewish people, customarily sells all the chametz in Israel to a non-Jew at a symbolic price (and buys it back immediately following the holiday).

 

The Seder - This is a lengthy ceremonial meal held on the eve of the holiday (the evening before the first day of the holiday). The family gathers around the holiday table for the Seder - the reading of the Haggadah and the holiday meal. The Haggadah is a compilation of texts from Jewish tradition - passages from the Bible, from the Mishna, commentaries and songs, whose main theme is the exodus from Egypt. The purpose of the reading of the Haggadah is to transmit the Pesach tradition from one generation to the next (thus fulfilling the Torah precept, “and you shall tell your son”), and the rituals are designed first and foremost to arouse the children’s curiosity. The rituals during the Seder are all symbolic, such as the eating of matzah and bitter herbs, the drinking of four goblets of wine, singing together, and of course the big meal.

 

Afikoman - In order to encourage the children to stay awake throughout the Seder, it is customary to hide a special piece of matzah, called the Afikoman, somewhere in the house, and the children have to find it. Whoever finds it usually gets a prize.

 

Important Information

 

Making matzah ​The first day of Pesach, and similarly the last day (the “seventh day of Pesach” or “second holiday”) are holy rest days on which productive work is forbidden. Almost all Israeli businesses are closed on these days. The intermediate days (Chol ha-Mo’ed) are half-holiday, half regular weekday. Many offices and businesses are only open half a day (usually the morning), and many Israeli families go on vacations or day-trips out of town. Since this period is also a vacation period from school, take into account that many vacation sites will be full of Israeli families.

 

Most Israeli restaurants observe the kosher food laws of Pesach, and many places will offer kosher-for-Pesach alternatives to regular foods. Many small eateries are closed for their annual vacation on Pesach, to avoid the necessity of making the premises kosher for Pesach. In recent years, particularly in Tel Aviv and the surrounding cities, there has been a relaxing of the stringent observance of Pesach in restaurants, and you will be able to find restaurants that serve bread, cakes and pasta dishes. Please note: not only bread products, but also beer is not kosher for Pesach.

 

Mimouna: Customs and Information

 

Celebrating the Mimouna


On the evening after the seventh day of Pesach, which is a holy rest day, Jews of North African origin, particularly Morocco, celebrate Mimouna as part of the Pesach festivities. The origin of the celebrations is unclear, but is usually associated with the anniversary of the death of Rabbi Maimon ben Abraham, the father of the great medieval Rabbi Moses Maimonides (also known as Rambam).

 

On Mimouna night people go from house to house, visiting friends and relatives who are celebrating this holiday, and in neighborhoods where there is a large concentration of Moroccans Jews this house-to-house visiting lasts until the small hours of the night. The following day is also devoted to family celebrations, to hospitality and visiting, and in many public places hundreds of celebrants gather for picnics.

 

In recent years Mimouna has become a celebration in which everyone wants to participate, and politicians often take advantage of the festivities to curry favor with the large ethnic Moroccan population.

 

HOLIDAY CUSTOMS

 

Sweet foods - The festive meal is composed solely of sweet foods, in order to emphasize the hope for a sweet life: fruit preserves, cakes, marzipan and other homemade confections. Since these foods are made during Pesach, they are all made without flour or any other ingredient that is not kosher for Pesach.

 

Mufleta - this is the traditional Moroccan Mimouna food. As soon as Pesach is over, and chametz is again permitted, the women prepare a dough made of flour and yeast, which is spread in flat circles, fried in butter and served with honey. This is the first chametz eaten after Pesach, and the flour for it is purchased immediately after the end of the holiday.

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION


Try to find a Moroccan family that is celebrating Mimouna, so that you too can experience this folk holiday that has no tradition of prayers or special precepts like other traditional Jewish holidays.

 

Photo provided by  Israel Tourism Ministry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s Go Hand in Hand with Yad B’Yad

For those who don’t yet know, Yad B’Yad is a non-profit organization aimed at helping underprivileged kids and kids at risk.

 

On Monday night a sparkling benefit concert was held at the Recanati Auditorium of Tel Aviv’s Museum of Art. Art lovers, music lovers and kind-hearted donors gathered for a scintillating concert performance: “From La Scala to Champs Elysees”. Performed by international tenor Gaby Sadeh and international “chansonist” and singer Judy Bachar, and supported by the amazing pianist Eitan Schmeisser (who also happens to be a virtuoso concert conductor), they had the audience eating out their hands.

 

The evening opened with a welcome by Shelly Hoshen, President and founder of Yad B’Yad (“Hand in Hand”). With deep emotion she thanked the guests who bought concert tickets (a donation to the organization) and the dozens of volunteers who work for the organization “… and without whom I would not be standing here this evening”. Shelly also thanked the many donors who support the organization, and mentioned two in particular (with special awards to them): Natan Levinger from New York, a long-time supporter and donor, and Said Abulafia, scion of a Jaffa family with a bakery business stretching way back into the mists of time (1879 to be exact).

 

Judy, Gaby and Eitan gave a hand-clapping roller-coaster execution of opera classics, popular songs and a beautiful piano performance. The songs, in French, Italian, Spanish, Hebrew and English were professional – and stunningly beautiful. We “heard” Edith Piaf, Yves Montand, Placido Domingo, Shoshana Damari, Yehoram Gaon and other famous performers, right here on stage in Tel Aviv, all together. A privileged audience indeed.

 

Yad B’Yad already runs “Warm Homes” in several centers, with more to open this year. The Association runs 10 such houses in the center of the country, where children at risk between the ages of three and a half and seven come after kindergarten and school hours. The children stay until six in the evening and receive from the professional staff everything that their families and neighborhood do not provide: Hot meals, cognitive enrichment, emotional support, appreciation of values and normative behavior, and an abundance of warmth and love. Children of all races, creeds, religions and ethnic background mix and meet and get the same dose of warmth. A perfect recipe designed to nurture a future generation of integrated, compassionate and non-judgmental adults.

 

A warm hand to HAND IN HAND. Perhaps the future is in their hands.

Call 03-6203141 to donate.

 

 

 Photos  Silvia G Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tel Aviv, probably the most vibrant city on the Mediterranean, was transformed into “the city that never sleeps” by Tel Aviv’s eighth mayor, the legendary Shlomo "Chich" Lahat. The city’s shoreline boasts dozens of restaurants, cafes, pubs, discos and jazz clubs that together with the city’s other attractions lure throngs of visitors from both Israel and abroad.

 

In a recent posting by the National Geographic website, Tel Aviv was ranked as one of the top ten oceanfront cities of the world, joining San Diego, Tallinn, St John’s, Marseille, Perth, Brisbane, Durban, Vladivostok and Portland. National Geographic groups these cities together, saying that the “glittering seascapes provide both the backdrop and the beat of these waterfront urban meccas.”

 

There’s always plenty of action along Tel Aviv’s shoreline. Tel Aviv-Yafo boasts nearly 9 miles and 13 beaches along its shores, equipped with lounge chairs, restaurants, bars, outdoor gyms, children’s playgrounds and a promenade along the shore line with continual movement from walkers, joggers or those just enjoying the view and taking a stroll.

 

Often referred to as “the city that doesn’t sleep,” the shoreline of Tel Aviv boasts dozens of restaurants, cafes, and ice cream parlors busy all day long, while pubs, discos and jazz clubs blossom after dark. Regardless of the hour, there is always something happening on the sea front, from clowns and caricaturists to tattoo artists, hair-braiders and magicians, as well as the popular and iconic paddle-ball game called matkot and even Israeli folk-dancing.

 

Four beaches are accessible to people with disabilities: Tzuk, Northern Tzuk, Metzizim and Hilton (all in the northern part of the city). Lifeguard and tourist police services are available during the official bathing season of May through October. The city’s beaches are well-equipped with changing rooms, showers and toilets.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Σας ευχαριστώ – That’s “Thank You” in Greek.

 

And a big thank you goes Tel Aviv’s Sheraton Hotel when it went “Greek” last Wednesday night: Starwood Hotels & Resorts Greece hosted a delightful evening to re-introduce itself to Israeli society, travel professionals and journalists.

 

A tempo Greek musical trio, Greek delicacies (Chefs were flown in from Greece to make sure of the authenticity), Ouzo flowing like water – what else could have made this evening any better? There was one thing – and they did it! A raffle for three prizes of valuable travel awards to Greece for three lucky guests.

 

Tim Ananiadis, Area Manager for Starwood in Greece, Cyprus and the Balkans was on hand to introduce the star players of the evening, the chefs, the musicians and the Starwood Team. In his brief and entertaining welcome he mentioned that Israelis are the #1 guests in terms of numbers at the Rhodes Sheraton – newly renovated only three years ago. (Markos E. Tzamalis, General Manager of the Sheraton Rhodes Resort also came to Israel especially to be at the party.)

 

Another interesting tidbit is that the chain’s Mykonos property is the only one on the island with its own private beach and marina. Starwood Hotels in Greece have a combined total of 280 private swimming pools. Take a dip anytime, anywhere.

 

Also on hand to welcome guests was Michail Terzimpasis, Director for Israel of the Greek National Tourism Organization. Greece is so close to Israel and the Tourism Organization has pulled out all the stops to make tourists arriving from Israel feel welcome.

 

If the welcome at the Tel Aviv Sheraton is anything to go by, the welcome in Greece must be stupendous. σας ευχαριστώ.

 

 Photo Silvia G  Golan

 

 

 

 

 

Fundraising for Children at Warm Home  Yad B'yad Association- Jaffa

 

Musical Event

 

From La Scala to Champs Elysees

 

The international tenor singer Gabi Sadeh & international singer Judy Bachar

 

At an exciting and entertaining vocal & musical summit meeting between the dramatic opera world and the romantic world of French chanson.


The performance accompanied by the pianist and opera conductor Ethan Schmeisser.

 

Monday, march 23rd 2015, 19:30 pm at Tel Aviv Museum of Art, 27 Shaul Hamelech Blvd, Recanati Auditorium

 

Ticket price: 100 NIS

 

* Tax-deductible donations under section 46

 

For tickets:

 

tel. 03-6203141 | fax 03-6203138 | This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | 36 Hanevi'im st., Tel Aviv

 

 About The Yad B’Yad Association

 The Yad B’Yad Association was founded in 1982 by Ms. Shelly Hoshen, psychologist and pre-school age counselor.


The Warm Home The Association runs 10 such houses in the center of the country, where children at risk between the ages of three and a half and seven come after kindergarten and school hours. The children stay until six in the evening and receive from the professional staff everything that their families and neighborhood do not provide: Hot meals, cognitive enrichment, emotional support, appreciation of values and normative behavior, and an abundance of warmth and love.

 

  

 Mrs Shelly Hoshen 

 

 

 

 

Photos provided by Yad B'yad Association PR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kfar Maccabiah, March 2015    חג פורים   CHAG PURIM AND ITS COSTUMES   Why do we dress up on Purim?

 

Dear Friends,


Purim is a time of celebration. 2400 years ago, the Jewish people were in danger of total annihilation - for the first time; instead, the Children of Israel fought for their lives, defeating completely an army composed by 75,000 troops. Why do we change our identities - using costumes - to remember and celebrate such liberation? Three related reasons to the salvation are been provided:

 

The Book of Esther -Megillat Esther- that we read on this festivity, explains: "...the enemies of the Jews had expected to rule over them, but the fortunes were altogether reversed, and the Jews did rule over their enemies" (Esther 9:1).


The victory of Purim transformed the Jews from victims to victors, and, in memory of this switch, we change our appearances to celebrate Purim - dressing up as different characters.
The Ba'al Shem Tov (1698-1760), the founder of Chassidism, teaches that there is a direct connection between the Purim's mitzvah (the precept) of matanot laevionim (helping the poor people) and the costumes. The reason for this is simple: the best way to give charity is secretly, when the identity of the giver and the recipient are unknown to each other, so as not to embarrass the recipient of the money; therefore, we dress up in Purim. Nor the giver neither the recipient can be recognized; there can not be any embarrassing situation while giving and receiving the charity.

 

Purim's miracle was a "hidden" one. In the book of Esther there is not a single mention of God's name, as if everything occurred "by pure chance": By pure chance Esther was chosen to be queen; Mordechai overheard the conspiracy against the king Achashverosh; the king was in a receptive mood when queen Esther came to call; the king slept badly one night and read in the book of his Chronicles how Mordechai saved his life; Haman entered just as the king was thinking of how to reward Mordechai; Harbona, the chamberlain, broke in at a critical moment to report that Haman had already erected the gallows to kill Mordechai... Too many casual things lead not to casualty, but causality. In memory of this hidden miracle, we "physically hide ourselves" by dressing up.

 

In the spirit of our Maccabi Movement, perhaps the most significantly component of the Book of Esther is that we did not stand in passivity while being in absolute danger, but we took the destiny in our hands, fighting for our life and continuity. We knew we had a shared destiny, and we united as a people to face the challenges together.

 

Let this Purim festival bring lots of happiness to our Movement, and to the whole People of Israel everywhere, overcoming today's challenges.


With best wishes,

Chag Purim Sameach!

Chazak ve'ematz!

Rabbi Carlos A. Tapiero
Deputy Director-General & Director of Education
Maccabi World Union

 

 

Photo provided by Maccabi World Union

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purim, one of Judaism's more colorful and popular holidays, is celebrated this year between sunset Wednesday, 4 March, and sunset Thursday, 5 March, in most of Israel – excluding Jerusalem where Purim will be celebrated from sunset on Thursday, 5 March, until sunset on Friday, 6 March (see below). Purim is not a public holiday in Israel, but many offices, shops, and public institutions (including the GPO) will operate on a reduced basis. Schools will be closed, but public transportation will operate as usual, and newspapers will be published.

Background to Purim

Purim commemorates the events described in the Book of Esther. In Esther 3:8, the anti-Semitic Haman, Grand Vizier of the Persian Empire, tells Persian King Ahasuerus that, “There is a certain people scattered abroad and dispersed among all the peoples... in your kingdom. Their laws are different from those of every people, neither do they keep the king's laws. Therefore, it does the king no profit to suffer them. If it please the king, let it be written that they be destroyed...” Thus, Haman coined one of the most infamous anti-Semitic canards: That the Jews are a clannish and alien people who do not obey the laws of the land. At Haman's contrivance, a decree is then issued for all Jews in the Persian Empire to be massacred. But, as the Book of Esther subsequently relates, Haman’s plot was foiled and, “The Jews had light and gladness, and joy and honor...a feast and a good day.” (8:16-17)

Throughout the centuries, Purim – which celebrates the miraculous salvation of the Jews and the thwarting of Haman’s genocidal plot – has traditionally symbolized the victory of the Jewish people over anti-Semitic tyranny. As such, Purim is a happy, carnival-like holiday.

The Fast of Esther

Wednesday, 4 March, is a fast day known as the Fast of Esther, commemorating (inter alia) the fact that Queen Esther – the heroine of the Book of Esther – and the entire Persian Jewish community fasted (4:16) in advance of Queen Esther’s appeal for King Ahasuerus not to implement Haman’s genocidal plot. The fast will extend from before sunrise in the morning until sunset. Special prayers and scriptural readings are inserted into the synagogue service.

Purim

After sunset Wednesday evening, 4 March, festive prayers will take place in synagogues, where the Book of Esther will also be read aloud. It is customary for people, especially children, to come to synagogue dressed in costume. During the reading of the Book of Esther, whenever Haman’s name is mentioned, congregants traditionally make as much noise as possible in order to drown out his name – a reflection of God’s promise (Exodus 17:14) to, “blot out,” the Amalekite nation, of which Haman was a descendant; special Purim noisemakers may be used for this purpose. The Book of Esther will be read again during morning prayers on Thursday, 5 March. A special Purim prayer is inserted into the daily prayers and the blessing after meals.

On Purim, Jews are enjoined by the Book of Esther (9:22) to send gifts of food to each other, make special contributions to the poor, and have a festive holiday meal in the afternoon. To this end, the day is also marked by collections for various charities, and by people visiting neighbors and friends to deliver baskets of food, prominent among which are small, three-cornered, fruit-filled pastries known as Oznei Haman in Hebrew (Haman’s ears) or Hamantaschen in Yiddish (Haman’s pockets).

At the festive meal, some maintain the custom of becoming so inebriated that they cannot distinguish between, “Blessed is Mordechai,” (Esther’s uncle and the hero of the Book of Esther) and, “Cursed is Haman.”

Shushan Purim

In Jerusalem, Purim is ordinarily celebrated one day later than it is in the rest of the world; accordingly, all Purim-related observances are postponed by one day. This practice originates from the fact that an extra day was prescribed for the Jews of Shushan (the modern Susa, one of the Persian Empire's four capitals) to defend themselves against their enemies. This second day is known as Shushan Purim. As mentioned in the Book of Esther itself (9:16-19), Jews living in walled cities (later defined by rabbinical authorities to mean walled cities at the time that Joshua entered the Land of Israel) celebrate Purim one day later than Jews living in unwalled cities. There are several other such cities in Israel where Shushan Purim is celebrated. In some cities whose status is in doubt, the Book of Esther will actually be read on both days.

In many places in Israel, Purim is marked by special parades; the most famous of these takes place in Tel Aviv. Many kindergartens, schools, synagogues, and towns will also host special Purim parties and carnivals.

Purim in Film

Following are clips from six films (courtesy of the Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive) that depict the various ways in which Purim has been celebrated:

Adloyada 1960 – Color scenes of the colorful procession in Tel Aviv 55 years ago.

Faces of Freedom (1960) – New immigrants are absorbed into Israeli society at the beginning of the 1960s. The film begins with a Purim carnival.

Springtime in Palestine (1928) - Comprehensive survey of the developing country in the 1920s. Includes a Bukharian Purim feast and scenes of the 1928 carnival in which Baruch Agadati appears with Tzipporah Tzabari, the first Purim queen of Tel Aviv (from 11:33 min).

Eretz Yisrael: Building Up the Jewish National Home (1934) – The film begins with scenes of the Adloyada in Tel Aviv. It continues with agricultural scenes in Kibbutz Ein Harod, Deganya A and the women’s agricultural school in Nahalal.

Edge of the West (1961) – A color film surveying Jewish life in Morocco in the early 1960s, including Purim celebrations (from 28:35 min.)

Hassidic Music (1994) – From the series “A People and Its Music” which depicts various Jewish music traditions. Includes scenes of Lubavitch Hassidim celebrating Purim (from 23:22 min.)

Purim events in Jerusalem

https://www.jerusalem.muni.il/en/Events/HolidaysEvents/Pages/default.aspxv

Purim events in Tel Aviv

*Street party in Kikar HaMedina *Tours and performances for the whole family at the Bialik area *Workshops and children’s cinema at Tel Aviv Cinemateque *HaKaron Theater is coming from Jerusalem to Yad LeBanim in Tel-Aviv and more

Like last year, the culture institute of Tel-Aviv-Yafo’s city hall, as well as those working in cooperation, are inviting the public to celebrate Purim around the city’s streets.

Purim Street Party

Friday 6th March, 12:00-17:00, Kikar HaMedina

An enormous street party, featuring top-notch DJs. This year’s lineup will have the best DJs, including British electronic music legend, John Digweed, who will be raving for the first time under the open skies of Tel-Aviv. In addition to Digweed, the lineup will feature: Eli Nisan, Michal Serr, Friendly Fire’s Oshri Cohen and Jenia Tarsol, Tomer Maisner and Astrix. While the party-goers enjoy the party and urban street festivities, there will be a wide range of music and fashion items offered. Entrance is free of charge. In the case of rain, the event will be postponed.

Other Tel Aviv Purim parties can be found here:

http://www.touristisrael.com/purim-in-tel-aviv/5336/

***

2015 Purim at the Tel Aviv Port: Purim Carnival in the Air

All activities in the Tel Aviv Port are free of charge

Thursday 5th March, 11:00 – 17:00

“Carnival in the Air”— colorful and fun for the whole family, will include a variety of activities and great shows. The activities and shows include: a trapeze show, a tightrope walking show, dance and acrobatics show, bungee jumping onto a bouncy castle, remote controlled airplane show, games, workshops, theater in the street with larger puppet figures, colorful kites, and a Purim carnival parade that will feature Brazilian rhythm musicians and colorful stilt walkers.

www.yarid-hamizrach.co.il

The Flying Trapeze- an enormous trapeze towerat a height of 12 meters, which will be in use the entire day, sharing the breath-taking showcase of experienced professionals with the general public. The trapeze facilities will be operated by an experienced team, in a way that will enable the audience to experience flying on a trapeze with total confidence under professional supervision.

Tightrope walking 5 meters up- the entire performance takes place in the air, and the audience can watch the entire show on the rope; bicycle riding, blinded walking, all five meters above the ground. Additionally, there will be a practical workshop on tightrope walking.

Air Time- dance and acrobatic show in the air; a pair of artists performing exercises set to Latin music. There will also be a Hui workshop throughout the day.

Trampoline Bungee - fun for the whole family, bouncy castle bungee-jumping, supported by a large trampoline.

Exclusive Purim at Tel Aviv Port: A Spanish group Cal y Canto perform “A-TA-KAI”- a surrealistic dance team with large figures flying over the audience makes for an avant-garde and surprisingly authentic show that will leave the audience mesmerized and speechless.

Carney Games - the fair will feature a variety of carney game stations that will appeal to the whole family: junior fisherman, duck drops, the memory game, ring toss and more. Prizes will be awarded at each station.

Purim Mask Workshop- the public is invited to create and design masks. The creative design session is for all age groups.

***

Bialik Purim for the Whole Family

Wednesday – Saturday, March 4th-7th 10:00 – 14:00

On Purim, the Bialik House (the home of the national poet) and the city house (the old city hall building) will open the gates and will receive visitors with children’s festive tours and performances.

Register by phone recommended: 03 525 3403 │ Places limited

Tours:

Bialik House tour: “Of poems and choruses”

Bialik and his songs celebrated the spirit of Purim in his home. The songs were disguised- they forgot to remove the costume and now Bialik can’t find them! Come help Bialik find the children’s poems on a tour that is full of laughter and song.

City House tour: the “ad-lo-yadah” and other processions. The city is recreating the “ad-lo-yadah” experience in Tel-Aviv. How can we see the very first procession of “ad-lo-yada” and the recreated one too? Come celebrate with us the colorful and humorous holiday in the city’s house!

Mask workshop

At the mask-creation workshop, every child can make his/her own unique Venetian mask, inspired by children’s songs of Haim Nachman Bialik.

Performances:

“Bialik’s poety book” │ Wednesday, March 3rd 11 am

Literary-musical discussion about the meaning of words in the songs, the placement of rhythm, and the power of the imagination. Writing, playing and singing Boaz Albert. Ages 3 and up. Seminar is 40 minutes.

“Bialik- a living flower” │ Thursday, March 5th at 11 am

Actress-singer Estee Nissim, with a guitar and flower crown, performs the story of a lonely and imaginative child who became a great poet. The show includes songs from “Poems and Choruses” and the legend of “King Solomon and the Bee.” Directed by Masha Nemirovsky. Ages 4 and up. Performance is 30 minutes.

“Eliezer Ben-Yehuda” │ Saturday, March 7th at 11 am

Journey into the life of the founder of the Hebrew language. In amusing ways, the stories, the games and music make for a joyous in connection to the Hebrew language. Gameplay: Tzipi Lichtenstein and Ofer Shalchin. Music: Ofer Shalchin. Ages 6 and up. Presentation/performance is 50 minutes.

Prices:

Tours, performances and workshops:

Adult 25 ₪

Child 45 ₪

(For DigiTel card-holders, one free adult pass with purchase of child pass)

Performance-only prices:

“Bialik’s song book” and “Bialik- a living flower”

30 ₪

“Eliezer Ben-Yehuda”

35 ₪

(For DigiTel card-holders, one chaperoning parent receives free pass with purchase of child’s ticket)

Paid parking available at Mughrabi and Dizengof Center

Yaron Purim Festival

Wednesday-Friday, March 4th-6th 10:00 – 17:00

For the upcoming Purim, there will be a Yaron Festival between March 4th and 6th. Festival performances will take place this in different venues across the city of Tel-Aviv: the Tel-Aviv Art Museum, Smolars Auditorium at Tel-Aviv University, Dohal Center, Ruzin Center, the Frankfurt House, and the Barbour House. You are invited to enjoy the variety of shows, including children’s favourite from the Orna Porat Theater.

DigiTel card-holders can take advantage of special pricing:

52 ₪ (instead of 75 ₪) for performances in the municipal halls

The Court Jester- Barbour House

Datia’s Goofy Storehouse- Dohal

In Bialik’s Garden- Frankfurt House

Peter and the Wolf- Ruzin Center

65 ₪ (instead of 90 ₪) for performances in the Smolars (Tel-Aviv University) and Recanti and Asia (Tel-Aviv Art Museum) halls. For information on all the performances, please check:

http://www.porat-theater.co.il/show_board.php?type=yaron_shows

***

Purim in Sarona

Thursday - Saturday, March 5th-7th 10:00 – 16:00, Sarona

Performances for children at 11 am and 1 pm, and family dancing (free of charge)

Creative workshops, cosmetics and tattoos (entrance fee required)

March 5th- Galit and Ephraim’s show

March 6th- Cooks Oren and Revital

March 7th- The Schlegels

***

Purim in the Eretz Israel Museum

Wednesday - Saturday, March 4th-7th

Additional information: www.eretzmuseum.org.il

Stories of a thousand and one nights at the museum-

The stories come to life through the museum’s displays.

Come find the cave of the pirates and the enchanted lamp; meet Alibaba; Aladdin and the merchants and participate in the stories, tasks and mysteries that captivated the king for many nights.

Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 12:30 pm

Creativity Workshop-

Genie lamp- Designing a colorful genie from paper and cloth

The treasure’s jewels- making jewels from an exquisite variety of materials

Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 12:30 pm; 1:30 pm

Planetarium shows: (except Fridays)

The stars- Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 1:30 pm

The astronaut- Time: 12:30 pm

DigiTel card-holders: entrance to the museum + story telling +creativity workshop + planetarium show- 70 ₪ alone (except Fridays).

Purim at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art

Wednesday 4th March 10:00 – 13:00

Workshop: Illustrating Purim Scrolls

A painting workshop, artists decorate Purim scrolls, each one telling the personal story of the artist. The workshop will be working with ink on parchment and mixed media.

Workshop: "Hats Fly Up High!"

Sculpture workshop following the characters and costumes in works of art.

The workshop will create unique hats ready-made technique that combines sculpture with modern materials.

Workshop: A Chance

Print workshop. The workshop will allow participants to use a printing press and printing plates, inspired by works of art from the collections of the museum.

70₪ a workshop. Tickets much be purchased in advance from TA Museum. Places limited.

Similarities - An interactive exhibition for the whole family

The 'Similarities' exhibition explores changes in form and materiality – from two to three dimensions. Visitors are exposed to wire sculpture, line drawings and tactile linear shapes. The exhibition features original works by Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti and Alexander Calder.

Along with works of art, visitors are invited to enjoy each corner of the interactive session: Drawing on iPad's, cave paintings, line games and activities using sound, Interactive technology of the contours of the body, movie screenings such as "La Linea" and animation in pencil.

Entrance is free for those under the age of 18.

***

Purim at the Suzanne Dellal Centre

Wednesday-Saturday, 4th – 7th March

"Kung Fu Dance" performed by 11 Kung Fu Fighters

For details and ticket 03-5105656

Digi-Tel card holders – receive a bonus ticket of 1 + 1

Every year the Suzanne Dellal Center in cooperation with the Embassy of the People's Republic of China and the Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China, will mark Chinese New Year at the Suzanne Dellal Center. This year celebrates the year of the lamband the Gateway band will arrive in Israel to present the sweeping show "Kung Fu Dance". Created with contemporary energy and radiating the rich musical life of fighters & artists the performance, for the first time combines the art of Kung Fu and dance.

A show for the whole family - contemporary, closed, special, full of energy and in Israel for the first time - a show not to be missed!

***

The Marzipan Fairy - The Train Theater in Jerusalem comes to Tel Aviv "Yad Le'Banim"

Monday 9th Marach, at 17:00, at the Yad Le'Banim

For ages 3+. Tickets can be purchased by phone 02-5618514 or at the Train Theater

"Mick had a wonderful dream, she told me and now I want to tell you all."

So begins the journey of Mick and the dwarf Tino who have nothing but their father's magic word, and a candy fairy who wants to find a friend but does not know how. In their journey, the characters cope with fear. The play is soft and funny with a great resolution at its end.

Children actively participate, encouraged by song, music and magical words."

***

Children's Purim Events at the Tel Aviv Cinematheque

For more information please visit: http://www.cinema.co.il/

Friends for Life in cooperation with the animal charity SPCA

Thursday 5th March

Before the screening of the films "Open Season" and "Bill and Bull" there will be a meeting with Mika the dog and Naama Rolnik his trainer, who serve as consultants to the Adoptions Animal Welfare Society of Israel.

Naama explains about the animals waiting to be housed in safe and loving homes and how SPCA encourages the special bond woven between kids and their dogs, demonstrated by Mika in basic training exercises.

"Open Season" (USA 2006) - 11:00, Theatre 4

86 minutes, dubbed into Hebrew) for ages 5+ price at the box office: 30 ₪

"Bill and Bull" (France 2013) - 13:30, Theatre 4

82 minutes (French & English subtitles) ages 8+ price at the box office: 30₪

Workshop: Secrets of the Cinema

Thursday 5th March at 16:00, Theatre 4& Friday 6th March at 12:30 Theatre 4

For ages 8+ Box office price: 40 ₪. Subscribers and those in full costume 30₪

A special workshop for Purim reveals the secrets of cinematic illusion by using the green screen technique. The workshop will teach the principles of the use of the green screen with demonstrations from well-known movies. Volunteers will be selected from the audience to take part in the illusion.

Length of the workshop: 50 minutes.

Friday for Heroines and Heroes

Friday 6th March 10:30 Theatre 3

"Breaking the Ice" (USA 2013)

(102 minutes, dubbed in Hebrew) ages 5+, box office price: 30₪

Knights from the films of Justin the Hero

Friday 6th March 14:00, Theatre 3

Led by Director and screenwriter Alon Gur Arye

Ages 5+, box office price: 40₪

A magical morning for children and families dedicated to stories of knights and cavalry. Who were the medieval knights who became the heroes of adventures stories? What are the different types of knights? How does one know how to recognize a real knight if you meet one? The knights who saved kingdoms and fought dragons, the Knights of the Round Table, the Chronicles of Narnia. The film "Justin the Hero" will be screened as the story of a boy who dreamed of becoming a Knight.

"Justin the Hero" (Spain 2013) 90 minutes, dubbed in Hebrew

"The Red Balloon" restored films by Albert Morris

Purim - Saturday 7th March, 11:00, Theatre 4

Ages 8+ box office price: 30 ₪, free to members

'The Red Balloon' (France 1956) - 40 minutes, French with English subtitles

'The Wild White Horse' (France 1953) 40 minutes, French with English subtitles

The Hilarious World of Laurel and Hardy

Saturday 7th March 14:00, Theatre 3

Led by director and screenwriter Alon Gur Arye

Not to be missed. Ages 5+, box office price: 40 ₪

An event for children and families. 'Laurel and Hardy' are considered by many as the most successful comedy duo in the history of cinema. During the event the audience will explore the behind the scenes of the most famous and funny moments in their films. How they were able to create 106 films over the years? How did the film makers manage to cross the desert silent film cinema? Two silent comedies will be screened.

"Escape to Freedom" (USA 1929) - 20 minutes, Music, English and Hebrew subtitles

"Prison breakout, the Second 100 Years" (USA 1927) - 20 minutes, English and Hebrew subtitles.

 

 

 

 

 

*Street party in Kikar HaMedina *Tours and performances for the whole family at the Bialik area *Workshops and children's cinema at Tel Aviv Cinemateque *HaKaron Theater is coming from Jerusalem to Yad LeBanim in Tel-Aviv and more

 

Like last year, the culture institute of Tel-Aviv-Yafo's city hall, as well as those working in cooperation, are inviting the public to celebrate Purim around the city's streets.

 

Purim Street Party
Friday 6th March, 12:00-17:00, Kikar HaMedina
An enormous street party, featuring top-notch DJs. This year's lineup will have the best DJs, including British electronic music legend, John Digweed, who will be raving for the first time under the open skies of Tel-Aviv. In addition to Digweed, the lineup will feature: Eli Nisan, Michal Serr, Friendly Fire's Oshri Cohen and Jenia Tarsol, Tomer Maisner and Astrix. While the party-goers enjoy the party and urban street festivities, there will be a wide range of music and fashion items offered. Entrance is free of charge. In the case of rain, the event will be postponed.

 

Other Tel Aviv Purim parties can be found here:
http://www.touristisrael.com/purim-in-tel-aviv/5336/

 

***
2015 Purim at the Tel Aviv Port: Purim Carnival in the Air
All activities in the Tel Aviv Port are free of charge
Thursday 5th March, 11:00 – 17:00
"Carnival in the Air"— colorful and fun for the whole family, will include a variety of activities and great shows. The activities and shows include: a trapeze show, a tightrope walking show, dance and acrobatics show, bungee jumping onto a bouncy castle, remote controlled airplane show, games, workshops, theater in the street with larger puppet figures, colorful kites, and a Purim carnival parade that will feature Brazilian rhythm musicians and colorful stilt walkers.

 

www.yarid-hamizrach.co.il

 

The Flying Trapeze- an enormous trapeze tower at a height of 12 meters, which will be in use the entire day, sharing the breath-taking showcase of experienced professionals with the general public. The trapeze facilities will be operated by an experienced team, in a way that will enable the audience to experience flying on a trapeze with total confidence under professional supervision.

 

Tightrope walking 5 meters up- the entire performance takes place in the air, and the audience can watch the entire show on the rope; bicycle riding, blinded walking, all five meters above the ground. Additionally, there will be a practical workshop on tightrope walking.

 

Air Time- dance and acrobatic show in the air; a pair of artists performing exercises set to Latin music. There will also be a Hui workshop throughout the day.

 

Trampoline Bungee - fun for the whole family, bouncy castle bungee-jumping, supported by a large trampoline.

 

Exclusive Purim at Tel Aviv Port: A Spanish group Cal y Canto perform "A-TA-KAI"- a surrealistic dance team with large figures flying over the audience makes for an avant-garde and surprisingly authentic show that will leave the audience mesmerized and speechless.

 

Carney Games - the fair will feature a variety of carney game stations that will appeal to the whole family: junior fisherman, duck drops, the memory game, ring toss and more. Prizes will be awarded at each station.

 

Purim Mask Workshop- the public is invited to create and design masks. The creative design session is for all age groups.


***
Bialik Purim for the Whole Family
Wednesday – Saturday, March 4th-7th 10:00 – 14:00
On Purim, the Bialik House (the home of the national poet) and the city house (the old city hall building) will open the gates and will receive visitors with children's festive tours and performances.
Register by phone recommended: 03 525 3403 │ Places limited

 

Tours:
Bialik House tour: "Of poems and choruses"
Bialik and his songs celebrated the spirit of Purim in his home. The songs were disguised- they forgot to remove the costume and now Bialik can't find them! Come help Bialik find the children's poems on a tour that is full of laughter and song.

 

City House tour: the "ad-lo-yadah" and other processions. The city is recreating the "ad-lo-yadah" experience in Tel-Aviv. How can we see the very first procession of "ad-lo-yada" and the recreated one too? Come celebrate with us the colorful and humorous holiday in the city's house!

 

Mask workshop
At the mask-creation workshop, every child can make his/her own unique Venetian mask, inspired by children's songs of Haim Nachman Bialik.

 

Performances:
"Bialik's poety book" │ Wednesday, March 3rd 11 am
Literary-musical discussion about the meaning of words in the songs, the placement of rhythm, and the power of the imagination. Writing, playing and singing Boaz Albert. Ages 3 and up. Seminar is 40 minutes.

 

"Bialik- a living flower" │ Thursday, March 5th at 11 am
Actress-singer Estee Nissim, with a guitar and flower crown, performs the story of a lonely and imaginative child who became a great poet. The show includes songs from "Poems and Choruses" and the legend of "King Solomon and the Bee." Directed by Masha Nemirovsky. Ages 4 and up. Performance is 30 minutes.

 

"Eliezer Ben-Yehuda" │ Saturday, March 7th at 11 am
Journey into the life of the founder of the Hebrew language. In amusing ways, the stories, the games and music make for a joyous in connection to the Hebrew language. Gameplay: Tzipi Lichtenstein and Ofer Shalchin. Music: Ofer Shalchin. Ages 6 and up. Presentation/performance is 50 minutes.

 

Prices:
Tours, performances and workshops:
Adult 25 ₪
Child 45 ₪
(For DigiTel card-holders, one free adult pass with purchase of child pass)

 

Performance-only prices:
"Bialik's song book" and "Bialik- a living flower"
30 ₪

 

"Eliezer Ben-Yehuda"
35 ₪

(For DigiTel card-holders, one chaperoning parent receives free pass with purchase of child's ticket)

 

Paid parking available at Mughrabi and Dizengof Center

 

Yaron Purim Festival
Wednesday-Friday, March 4th-6th 10:00 – 17:00
For the upcoming Purim, there will be a Yaron Festival between March 4th and 6th. Festival performances will take place this in different venues across the city of Tel-Aviv: the Tel-Aviv Art Museum, Smolars Auditorium at Tel-Aviv University, Dohal Center, Ruzin Center, the Frankfurt House, and the Barbour House. You are invited to enjoy the variety of shows, including children's favourite from the Orna Porat Theater.

 

DigiTel card-holders can take advantage of special pricing:
52 ₪ (instead of 75 ₪) for performances in the municipal halls
The Court Jester- Barbour House
Datia's Goofy Storehouse- Dohal
In Bialik's Garden- Frankfurt House
Peter and the Wolf- Ruzin Center

 

65 ₪ (instead of 90 ₪) for performances in the Smolars (Tel-Aviv University) and Recanti and Asia (Tel-Aviv Art Museum) halls. For information on all the performances, please check:
http://www.porat-theater.co.il/show_board.php?type=yaron_shows

 

***
Purim in Sarona
Thursday - Saturday, March 5th-7th 10:00 – 16:00, Sarona
Performances for children at 11 am and 1 pm, and family dancing (free of charge)
Creative workshops, cosmetics and tattoos (entrance fee required)

 

March 5th- Galit and Ephraim's show
March 6th- Cooks Oren and Revital
March 7th- The Schlegels


***
Purim in the Israel Museum
Wednesday - Saturday, March 4th-7th

 

Additional information: www.eretzmuseum.org.il

 

Stories of a thousand and one nights at the museum-
The stories come to life through the museum's displays.

 

Come find the cave of the pirates and the enchanted lamp; meet Alibaba; Aladdin and the merchants and participate in the stories, tasks and mysteries that captivated the king for many nights.
Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 12:30 pm

 

Creativity Workshop-
Genie lamp- Designing a colorful genie from paper and cloth
The treasure's jewels- making jewels from an exquisite variety of materials
Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 12:30 pm; 1:30 pm

 

Planetarium shows: (except Fridays)
The stars- Time: 10:30 am; 11:30 am; 1:30 pm
The astronaut- Time: 12:30 pm

 

DigiTel card-holders: entrance to the museum + story telling +creativity workshop + planetarium show- 70 ₪ alone (except Fridays).

 

Purim at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art
Wednesday 4th March 10:00 – 13:00
Workshop: Illustrating Purim Scrolls
A painting workshop, artists decorate Purim scrolls, each one telling the personal story of the artist. The workshop will be working with ink on parchment and mixed media.
Workshop: "Hats Fly Up High!"


Sculpture workshop following the characters and costumes in works of art.
The workshop will create unique hats ready-made technique that combines sculpture with modern materials.
Workshop: A Chance
Print workshop. The workshop will allow participants to use a printing press and printing plates, inspired by works of art from the collections of the museum.
70₪ a workshop. Tickets much be purchased in advance from TA Museum. Places limited.

 

Similarities - An interactive exhibition for the whole family
The 'Similarities' exhibition explores changes in form and materiality – from two to three dimensions. Visitors are exposed to wire sculpture, line drawings and tactile linear shapes. The exhibition features original works by Pablo Picasso, Alberto Giacometti and Alexander Calder.
Along with works of art, visitors are invited to enjoy each corner of the interactive session: Drawing on iPad's, cave paintings, line games and activities using sound, Interactive technology of the contours of the body, movie screenings such as "La Linea" and animation in pencil.
Entrance is free for those under the age of 18.

 

***
Purim at the Suzanne Dellal Centre
Wednesday-Saturday, 4th – 7th March
"Kung Fu Dance" performed by 11 Kung Fu Fighters
For details and ticket 03-5105656
Digi-Tel card holders – receive a bonus ticket of 1 + 1

 

Every year the Suzanne Dellal Center in cooperation with the Embassy of the People's Republic of China and the Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China, will mark Chinese New Year at the Suzanne Dellal Center. This year celebrates the year of the lamb and the Gateway band will arrive in Israel to present the sweeping show "Kung Fu Dance". Created with contemporary energy and radiating the rich musical life of fighters & artists the performance, for the first time combines the art of Kung Fu and dance.

 

A show for the whole family - contemporary, closed, special, full of energy and in Israel for the first time - a show not to be missed!

 

***
The Marzipan Fairy - The Train Theater in Jerusalem comes to Tel Aviv "Yad Le'Banim"
Monday 9th Marach, at 17:00, at the Yad Le'Banim
For ages 3+. Tickets can be purchased by phone 02-5618514 or at the Train Theater

 

"Mick had a wonderful dream, she told me and now I want to tell you all."
So begins the journey of Mick and the dwarf Tino who have nothing but their father's magic word, and a candy fairy who wants to find a friend but does not know how. In their journey, the characters cope with fear. The play is soft and funny with a great resolution at its end.
Children actively participate, encouraged by song, music and magical words."

 

***
Children's Purim Events at the Tel Aviv Cinematheque
For more information please visit: http://www.cinema.co.il/

 

Friends for Life in cooperation with the animal charity SPCA
Thursday 5th March
Before the screening of the films "Open Season" and "Bill and Bull" there will be a meeting with Mika the dog and Naama Rolnik his trainer, who serve as consultants to the Adoptions Animal Welfare Society of Israel.
Naama explains about the animals waiting to be housed in safe and loving homes and how SPCA encourages the special bond woven between kids and their dogs, demonstrated by Mika in basic training exercises.


"Open Season" (USA 2006) - 11:00, Theatre 4
86 minutes, dubbed into Hebrew) for ages 5+ price at the box office: 30 ₪
"Bill and Bull" (France 2013) - 13:30, Theatre 4
82 minutes (French & English subtitles) ages 8+ price at the box office: 30₪

 

Workshop: Secrets of the Cinema
Thursday 5th March at 16:00, Theatre 4 & Friday 6th March at 12:30 Theatre 4
For ages 8+ Box office price: 40 ₪. Subscribers and those in full costume 30₪
A special workshop for Purim reveals the secrets of cinematic illusion by using the green screen technique. The workshop will teach the principles of the use of the green screen with demonstrations from well-known movies. Volunteers will be selected from the audience to take part in the illusion.
Length of the workshop: 50 minutes.

 

Friday for Heroines and Heroes
Friday 6th March 10:30 Theatre 3
"Breaking the Ice" (USA 2013)
(102 minutes, dubbed in Hebrew) ages 5+, box office price: 30₪

 

Knights from the films of Justin the Hero
Friday 6th March 14:00, Theatre 3
Led by Director and screenwriter Alon Gur Arye
Ages 5+, box office price: 40₪
A magical morning for children and families dedicated to stories of knights and cavalry. Who were the medieval knights who became the heroes of adventures stories? What are the different types of knights? How does one know how to recognize a real knight if you meet one? The knights who saved kingdoms and fought dragons, the Knights of the Round Table, the Chronicles of Narnia. The film "Justin the Hero" will be screened as the story of a boy who dreamed of becoming a Knight.
"Justin the Hero" (Spain 2013) 90 minutes, dubbed in Hebrew

 

"The Red Balloon" restored films by Albert Morris
Purim - Saturday 7th March, 11:00, Theatre 4
Ages 8+ box office price: 30 ₪, free to members
'The Red Balloon' (France 1956) - 40 minutes, French with English subtitles
'The Wild White Horse' (France 1953) 40 minutes, French with English subtitles

 

The Hilarious World of Laurel and Hardy
Saturday 7th March 14:00, Theatre 3
Led by director and screenwriter Alon Gur Arye
Not to be missed. Ages 5+, box office price: 40 ₪
An event for children and families. 'Laurel and Hardy' are considered by many as the most successful comedy duo in the history of cinema. During the event the audience will explore the behind the scenes of the most famous and funny moments in their films. How they were able to create 106 films over the years? How did the film makers manage to cross the desert silent film cinema? Two silent comedies will be screened.
"Escape to Freedom" (USA 1929) - 20 minutes, Music, English and Hebrew subtitles
"Prison breakout, the Second 100 Years" (USA 1927) - 20 minutes, English and Hebrew subtitles.

 

 

 

 

New: Four English Lecture Series in Jewish Studies at Schechter


Eight lectures per series at our Jerusalem campus


March - June 2015



1. Modern Jewish Literature: From Rabbi Nachman to Isaac Bashevis Singer with Dr. Shana Mauer, an expert in the field of Modern Jewish Literature.

Mondays, 10:30-12:00, starting March 9

 

2. The Philosophy of Moses Maimonides: "Guide for the Perplexed" with Dr. Ari Ackerman, a senior lecturer at the Schechter Institute in Jewish philosophy and education.

Tuesdays, 10:30-12:00 starting March 10

 

3. Biblical Figures in Midrash Aggadah with Dr. Pinhas Mandel, a senior lecturer at the Schechter Institute in and Rothberg School of Graduate Studies at the Hebrew University, where he lectures in the area of midrash and aggadah.

Wednesdays, 10:30-12:00, starting March 11

 

4. Jewish Women's Lives in the Middle Ages with Prof. Renée Levine Melammed, a lecturer in Jewish history at the Schechter Institute with expertise in Sephardi studies and women's studies.

Thursdays, 11:00-12:30, starting March 12

 

650 NIS for one series


Discounts for early registration or for more than one series


For information and registration, 074-7800-601, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.,

 

www.schechter.org


Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, 4 Avraham Granot St., Jerusalem

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Sixth Annual International Berg Conference


The Sixth Annual International Berg Conference / XXIst Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians: "Law in Transition"


The David Berg Institute for Law and History, with the support of the TAU Office of the Vice President, Cegla Center for Interdisciplinary Research, Entin Faculty of Humanities, and Yavetz Graduate School of Historical Studies will host the 6th Annual International Berg Conference / the XXIst Annual Forum of Young Legal Historians, scheduled to be held 1-3 March 2015 at the Buchmann Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University.

 

General Information


The upcoming conference aims at a comprehensive discussion of law in transition. A wide variety of transitions of historical significance will be explored: political, economic, social, cultural, and more. "Law"— legal symbols, discourses, players, institutions, theories, and texts—has played a significant role in historical transitions, and legal historians have been crucial in exploring its multiple and contradictory effects. The stakes are not just historical, but current: these studies encourage transitions in the way law itself is conceived, theorized, and researched.

 
Conference outlined program

 

http://en-law.tau.ac.il/sites/law-english.tau.ac.il/files/media_server/Law/Berg/events/AYLHTLV2015short_Program1-3-15.pdf

 

Conference Details


For further information on the conference and on the registration, please contact our administrator at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 

 

 

 

ART & TWIST

 

Art Auction / Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater, Neve Tzedek Quarter, Tel Aviv.


Pre-sale exhibition: from March 1st – March 3rd 2015, from 12:00 to 20:00

 

The Contemporary Art Auction will take place at the Suzanne Dellal Center on March 3rd at 19:30,  in the Yaron Yerushalmi Gallery.

 

The public Auction will include a blues musical performance and a sumptuous buffet. Only original works, by living and still-active artists will be presented, with prices ranging from $200 to $15,000.


Admission is free.

 

The auction collection includes oil paintings on canvas and wood, acrylic on canvas, watercolors, photographs, sculptures and more. Among the well-known artists presenting their works are Nini Alfasa, Eldad Pnini, Nahum Iliashimov, Sarit Gura, Benny Gassenbauer, Olga Suslova, Michal Shimoni, Marita Milkis, Shmuel Hajaj, Frida Rot Sasson, Yariv Avis Frimost , Nurit Shani and many more.

 

The Gallery Manager and auction impresario is Ron Laufer, who carefully filtered the new and promising artists and successfully curated an impressive high-quality museum-standard art collection. "Art & Twist creates a new concept and platform for contemporary original and unique artworks, as opposed to the existing auction houses that display and sell the same artists and the same works for decades," says Laufer. "The Gallery creates an comfortable, sprightlier sales scenario, where one can purchase contemporary, exciting and high-quality works directly from the artists, most of who are graduates of Bezalel [School of Art]. The Gallery brings art lovers contemporary art at realistic, rational prices, enabling anyone to buy great works from promising artist, the value of which in a few years may be as high as ten times their value today. This, compared with the works sold by sales houses, where prices have already peaked. Artwork in this collection represents a unique opportunity for investors and art lovers to invest in art whose monetary value will only increase."

 

"Our uniqueness, relative to other auction houses, is that for the first time in Israel we offer an auction composed entirely of contemporary art; not art of the deceased, but of the living artists. We accord them the opportunity to offer their work directly to the customer by auction, without mediation fees.

 

Conventional, traditional auction houses only offer deceased or highly renowned artists. For the first time in Israel, we offer a singular opportunity for the very best promising young Israeli artists, some of whom are already being displayed in leading collections and museums all over the world."

 

For further information please contact Ron Laufer:


ART & TWIST


054-907-2407

 

Web site: www.artandtwist.com

 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ArtandTwist


https://www.facebook.com/artatthefleamarket

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sixty one artists are exhibiting the best of contemporary glass – new and fresh approaches in a fascinating exhibit comprising some 100 diverse works, from tiny objects to statues and huge installations


Eretz Israel Museum, Tel Aviv/ Opens: 25 February, 2015/ closes 20 June, 2015


Curator: Henrietta Eliezer Brunner

 

The exhibit will display a comprehensive assortment of works that reflect local contemporary glass work. This is the third time that the museum is holding an exhibition that seeks to offer a platform for glass artists to present an up-to-date picture, contribute to the discourse, boost and expand activity, and enrich research in the field. 100 works will be on display, covering a period of the past four years.

 

The exhibit assembles together well-established glass artists alongside artists in their early stages, as well as artists who do not belong specifically to the world of glass, coming from different fields of art such as painting, sculpture, graphic design, textile design, jewelry design, industrial design and more.


The scale and range of the collection illustrates innovative artistic approaches that deal with contemporary issues alongside a broad range of work processes (from lampworking such as blowing, through warm glass processing such as molding, fusing, and slumping and cold glass processing). The ways of working in glass reflect the creative and imaginative ways in which the material has been used, as well as its diversity as an artistic expression. Glass functions as a connective tissue that joins together processes, aesthetic approaches, visual languages, and artistic practices.

 

Henrietta Eliezer Brunner, the exhibit curator: "With glass becoming an artistic medium, we find in it qualities that are beyond the aesthetics of the material and the technical skills of the artist. More and more, glass appears as conveying an artistic message, a point of departure – and less as an objective in itself. This diverse exhibit offers fresh approaches and new directions in the field. The works in the exhibit – from miniscule and intimate objects to large statues, from two-dimensional objects to installations – present a broad thematic scope that corresponds with fields of knowledge and culture. The works shift from the figurative to the abstract, from the realistic to the illusionary, from the personal to the universal, between a poetic dialogue with nature to ecological issues – but glass is their common theme and is used in an aesthetic and metaphorical way".

 

For more information – please check the museum website: www.eretzmusuem.org.il


Opening hours: Sunday – Wednesday, 10 am- 4 pm; Thursday: 10 am – 8 pm, Friday, 10 am- 2-pm, Saturday, 10 am- 4 pm.


Tickets: Children up to the age of 18 – free of charge; adults – NIS 48, Tel Aviv residents – NIS 38, Senior citizens- NIS 24

 

 Photo Leonid Pedrul

 

 

 

 

The gold coins from the Fatimid period (eleventh century CE) were discovered by a group of divers that reported the find to the Israel Antiquities Authority. Almost 2,000 gold coins over a thousand years old were salvaged in an excavation conducted by the Marine Archaeology Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

Kobi Sharvit, director of the Marine Archaeology Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority said, "The winter storms expose treasures from the sea".

 

The largest treasure of gold coins discovered in Israel was found in recent weeks on the seabed in the ancient harbor in Caesarea National Park. The group of divers from the diving club in the harbor found the lost treasure. According to them, at first they thought they had spotted a toy coin from a game and it was only after they understood the coin was "the real thing" that they collected several coins and quickly returned to the shore in order to inform the director of the dive club about their find who in turn reported the discovery to the Marine Archaeology Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority. After quickly organizing, divers of the Israel Antiquities Authority went together with the group of divers out to where the coins were found and using a metal detector discovered almost 2,000 gold coins in different denominations: a dinar, half dinar and quarter dinar, of various dimensions and weight.

 

According to Kobi Sharvit, director of the Marine Archaeology Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority, this is fascinating and rare historical evidence of life in the past which was exposed during winter storms. "The discovery of such a large hoard of coins that had such tremendous economic power in antiquity raises several possibilities regarding its presence on the seabed. There is probably a shipwreck there of an official treasury boat which was on its way to the central government in Egypt with taxes that had been collected. Perhaps the treasure of coins was meant to pay the salaries of the Fatimid military garrison which was stationed in Caesarea and protected the city. Another theory is that the treasure was money belonging to a large merchant ship that traded with the coastal cities and the port on the Mediterranean Sea and sank there. In the Marine Archaeological Unit of the Israel Antiquities Authority they are hoping that with the salvage excavations that will be conducted there, it will be possible to supplement our understanding of the entire archaeological context, and thus answer the many questions that still remain unanswered about the treasure.

 

According to Robert Cole, an expert numismaticist with the Israel Antiquities Authority, "The coins are in an excellent state of preservation, and despite the fact they were at the bottom of the sea for about a thousand years, they did not require any cleaning or conservation intervention from the metallurgical laboratory. This is because gold is a noble metal and is not affected by air or water. The coins that were exposed also remained in the monetary circulation after the Crusader conquest, particularly in the port cities through which international commerce was conducted. Several of the coins that were found in the assemblage were bent and exhibit teeth and bite marks, evidence they were "physically" inspected by their owners or the merchants. Other coins bear signs of wear and abrasion from use while others seem as though they were just minted.

 

Kobi Sharvit had this to say about the divers who found the treasure and reported it (Tzvika Feuer, Kobi Tweena, Avivit Fishler, Yoav Lavi and Yoel Miller). These divers are model citizens. They discovered the gold and have a heart of gold that loves the country and its history" Sharvit added, "The Law of Antiquities states that all antiquities belong to the state and that not reporting or removing antiquities from their location, or selling or trading them is an offense punishable by up to five years imprisonment. In this case the divers reported the find; but in many instances divers take the objects home and that way extremely important archaeological information is lost forever, which cannot be recovered. Therefore the discovery of the treasure underscores the need to combine the development of the place as a tourism and diving site with restrictions that will allow the public to dive there only when accompanied by inspectors or instructors from the diving club".

 

The Caesarea Development Company and Nature and Parks Authority welcomed the discovery of the treasure. According to them, "There is no doubt that the discovery of the impressive treasure highlights the uniqueness of Caesarea as an ancient port city with rich history and cultural heritage. After 2,000 years it is still capable of captivating its many visitors, of continuing to innovate and surprise again when other parts of its mysterious past are revealed in the ground and in the sea".

 

The Historical Background

 

The earliest coin exposed in the treasure is a quarter dinar minted in Palermo, Sicily in the second half of the ninth century CE. Most of the coins though belong to the Fatimid caliphs Al-Ḥākim (996–1021 CE) and his son Al-Ẓāhir (1021–1036), and were minted in Egypt and North Africa. The coin assemblage included no coins from the Eastern Islamic dynasties and it can therefore be stated with certainty this is a Fatimid treasure. The great value and significance of the treasure become apparent when viewed in light of the historical sources. For example, the description of the traveler and geographer Ibn Jubayr who writes that the Muslim residents of the settlements were required to pay the Fatimid government half their agricultural produce at harvest time, in addition to payment of a head tax of one dinar and five carats (twenty-four carats equal one dinar, hence the method used to measure gold according to carats). Descriptions in the Cairo Geniza from the eleventh and twelfth century CE tell, among other things, of the redemption of prisoners, including Jewish captives from Ashkelon that were transferred to Egypt. According to the documents, the Jewish community paid a sum of about five hundred gold dinars to redeem and return them to Israel, after which there still remained a debt of two hundred dinars. An especially high amount was paid for very important individuals. Thus one instance is mentioned in which eighty dinars were requested for the redemption of one prisoner. We know from the Cairo Geniza that gold coins were stored in sealed purses that contained c. 100 gold dinars, but not more than that.

 

The Fatimid kingdom was extremely rich and its wealth was legendary. The treasury at the time reported there were twelve million gold dinars in the capital's coffers in al-Qahira (today's Cairo). The rise of the Fatimid dynasty to power in the second half of the tenth century CE and its political and economic policies brought renewed growth to the maritime trade in the eastern Mediterranean basin. The Fatimids, who came from North Africa, brought trading practices to Egypt which were characteristic of the western Mediterranean Sea. Under their rule Caesarea and other coastal cities were developed. City walls were built; governors who were directly subordinate to the government in Egypt resided in them and had at their disposal garrisons that protected the cities against potential enemies. One of the outstanding features of this period is the expansion of international trade whereby merchant ships sailed alongside warships in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. Even during times of conflict and siege commerce between the Muslims and Crusaders did not cease and it prospered in times of peace.

 

Caesarea flourished and prospered during this period; vibrant commerce with other port cities was conducted through it despite the poor condition of the harbor which was built by Herod in Roman times. The Arab geographer Al-Muqaddasi describes Caesarea in his book The Best Divisions for Knowledge of the Regions which was written in c. 958 CE, a time when the Fatimids were waging war in Israel and Syria, "There is no more beautiful a city than it... its location is pleasant and its fruit delicious, and the city is also famous for its buffalo milk and white bread. It is protected by an impregnable fortress whose walls surround its inhabited territory. The drinking water is drawn from cisterns and wells". Similar descriptions also appear in the book by the noted Persian traveler Nasir Khusraw who visited Caesarea in 1047 CE. "A fine city blessed with an abundance of dates, oranges and lemons and flowing water, its walls are strong and the city gate is iron, water bursts forth in the city and from the courtyard of the Friday mosque one can see the sea and all that passes on it". Caesarea, which was enclosed within a mighty wall and had a garrison stationed there, did not capitulate to the Crusader army that passed it in 1099 CE on its way to Jerusalem, and the city only surrendered to the invaders on May 17, 1101 CE, after a two week siege.

 

Almost 2,000 coins were discovered on the seabed.

 

Photographic credit: Kobi Sharvit, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The title says it all: "So French, So Food". For the third successive year, the Embassy of the French Republic to the State of Israel, under the able conductorship ("Chef" – also "chief" in French) of H.E. Ambassador Patrick Maisonnave is arranging the French food festival in Israel.

 

On Sunday night the Ambassador hosted the launch celebration at his elegant Jaffa residence. Invitees included the who's who of Israeli society, captains of industry, media personalities, trend-setters of the Israeli cultural scene and of course foodies from all levels of the populace. Some prominent people in attendance included Gad Propper of "Osem" fame and also chairman of the Israel-EU Chamber of Commerce, Ron Huldai, Tel Aviv mayor, Joseph Ben David, mayor of Tiberius, Gilles Darmon (formerly from France) who founded the "LATET" charitable organization, Uri Jeremia, legendary chef at Akko's Uri Buri restaurant, and many more.

 

The event was organized to introduce the 21 French chefs who were brought to Israel especially for this event. They will fan out across the country to do their magic at a range of restaurants. At a press conference before the festivities, Ambassador Maisonnave explained the basic purpose: to introduce French gastronomic culture, French cuisine and French products to Israelis; and not only to the upper echelons of society. He added that this type of French food week is unique to Israel! No other country has had the privilege.

 

One of the attending chefs is none other than Guillaume Gomez, Chef Des Cuisines at the Palace Elysées (yes, the official residence of the President of France) and also President of the French Association of Chefs. The Ambassador jokingly remarked that President François Hollande is probably eating re-warmed hamburgers this whole week.

 

Another exciting face was of Chef Gérald Passédat, whose restaurant in Marseilles has had 3 Michelin stars since 2008. Catch him at Mul Yam in Tel Aviv. You can enjoy the gastronomy of Chef Simone Zanoni, famous for his cuisine at the 2-Michelin star Trianon Palace and who has recently opened the first "casher lemehadrin" (strictly kosher) elite restaurant in Paris, at the King David Hotel's "La Regence" in Jerusalem.

 

The Ambassador mentioned and thanked each of the amazing number of sponsors, both French and Israeli, who supported the event. He was also lavish in his praise of all the embassy staff (and others) who worked so hard to pull of the major production.

 

One of the major Israeli sponsors is supermarket chain, Mega, chosen as the main Israeli partner to market the imported products. The chain went further than just the food "week" – the 15th to 20th February – but has declared the whole month of February as French Food Month. A Mega representative also addressed the guests. "From the start it was clear that Israelis deeply appreciate quality French products on the supermarket shelves. Many of the items have already sold out and we are scrambling to replace them".

 

 

 For more information, visit: www.mega-bair-france.co.il

 

Guests were treated to a rich and glamorous buffet – naturally composed of French food; many cheeses, finger foods, desserts and of course, French wines and cognac. The accent on the Rhône-Alpes Region of France was unmistakable and received special mention from Ambassador Maisonnave with a warm recommendation to visit there as well.

 

Bon appetit.

 

 Photos Silvia G Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tel Aviv, Israel, Tuesday, February 10th, 2015. Accompanied by Dr. Landau, Minister of Tourism in Israel, the CEO of EL AL Airlines and the founder of Magdala, Fr Juan Solana LC, the 21st International Tourist Fair was inaugurated at the Israeli Trade Center in Tel Aviv.

 

During the opening, the Tourist Minister thanked all who participated in this event where more than 20,000 professionals, tourist agents and locals attended. As well, he welcomed the Mexican priest, Fr Juan Solana LC, as spokesman on behalf of Magdala, new tourist, cultural and religious center in northern Israel.

 

The tourist complex, Magdala, is located on the West shore of the Sea of Galilee and was inaugurated on May of 2014. Since then it has received more than 30,000 visitors from over the world, mainly from: USA, Canada, Mexico, Spain, Italy and Russia. The innovative project consists of an Archaeological Park and DUC IN ALTUM, prayer and worship center. A second phase is being constructed; it consists of a Hotel for 300 people and Restaurant for capacity up to 900 people. When the project finishes will offer more than 1000 jobs in the Galilee region.

 

Magdala is known as the crossroads of Jewish and Christian history, since the archaeological discoveries allow an encounter of two of the main religions on earth. The archaeological findings are dated to the First Century, Second Temple times and Jesus Public Ministry as well.

 

The Magdala founder, Fr Juan María Solana said: "It's an honor to be part of such an important event for the global tourism and cultures. I invite all who haven't been to The Holy Land, to come and the ones who already visited, to come back. It's an experience that not even money can buy".

 

The cultural, tourist and religious development of Magdala, expects to host more than 250,000 people at the beginning of 2016, being one of the most visited places by pilgrims and tourists in Galilee.

 

www.magdala.org

 

 Photo Provided by Magdala Center

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Masada Opera Festival at the Dead Sea   June 2015


Two Weekends, with Two Huge Productions at the Foot of Masada:


"Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini  Conducted by Daniel Oren


"Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff Conducted by James Judd

 

Hundreds of Participants, International Cast of Soloists, Choirs, Orchestra, Dancers and Actors
In Israel's Largest Cultural and Tourism Event

 

The Israeli Opera, which is celebrating its 30th season this year, will hold the fifth Masada Opera Festival – the largest international cultural event in Israel – presenting two masterpieces: "Tosca" by Giacomo Puccini and "Carmina Burana" by Carl Orff.


The festival will take place at the foot of Masada, in the Tamar Regional Council, over two weekends in June: June 4-6 and June 11-13. There will be four performances of "Tosca" and two performances of "Carmina Burana."


Hanna Munitz, Israeli Opera General Director: "Every year I remind myself that it all started with a fantastic dream that was hard to believe would come true... Now our festival takes shape for the fifth year, and this time we are privileged to stage not one, but two huge productions that are totally different from each other, on the same gigantic stage that is rebuilt every year especially for the Opera Festival at the foot of Masada.


The Masada Opera Festival has succeeded since its inauguration in 2010 to become one of the leading international opera festivals in the world and has positioned the Israeli Opera as an important and significant international opera house"


"Tosca" at the foot of Masada, which will be conducted by the Israeli Opera's music director Maestro Daniel Oren, one of the greatest conductors in the world for Italian operas, , and directed by Nicolas Joel, one of the most senior opera directors in the world, will provide viewers with a unique experience for this production, set against the backdrop of desert scenery and accompanied by lighting effects on Mount Masada. Daniel Oren meticulously selected a team of international and Israeli soloists, including Bulgarian soprano Svetla Vassileva in the role of Tosca, Italian tenor Fabio Sartori together with Argentinian tenor Gustavo Porta in the role of Cavaradossi, American baritone Scott Hendricks together with Russian baritone Sergei Murzaev as Scarpia, Italian bass Carlo Striuli as Angelotti, along with Israeli Opera soloists, including Vladimir Braun as the Sacristan, Joseph Aridan as Spoletta, Oded Reich as Sciarrone, Noah Briger as the Jailer and others. Also participating are the Israeli Opera Chorus conducted by Eitan Schmeisser, the Moran Children Choir and the Opera orchestra – the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion.


"Carmina Burana," the stirring creation by Carl Orff, will also take on a special character in a new fully staged production that is all spectacular colors and stylistic pyrotechnics, with the participation of hundreds of artists conducted by James Judd and directed by Michal Znaniecki, with a cast of hundreds of singers, musicians, dancers and actors. The soloists include soprano Alla Vasilevitsky, countertenor Alon Harari, and Italian baritone Enrico Maria Marabelli. Also participating are the Israeli Opera choir, the Ankor Children's Choir and the Opera orchestra – the Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion.


These productions of the Opera Festival at the foot of Masada are the largest and most complex ever held in Israel, and will employ 2,500 people in addition to 700 participants and operations crews.


The operas will be performed at the foot of Masada, with Mount Masada illuminated by special artistic lighting; the infrastructures include a stage measuring 35 meters deep and 64 meters wide, bleachers with some 6,500 comfortable seats, parking areas for hundreds of buses and private vehicles, media and Internet infrastructures, and a reception area featuring thousands of seats and some 160 ecological restrooms.


"Tosca" will be performed on two Thursdays, June 4 and 11, and on two Saturdays, June 6 and 13, at 21:30 (9:30 PM).


"Carmina Burana" will be performed on two Fridays, June 5 and 12, at 22:00 (10:00 PM).


The Masada Opera Festival is being produced in partnership with Arkia Airlines, the Tamar Regional Council, the Ministry of Tourism, the Dead Sea Hotel Association and Bimot. This year too, Arkia is providing the primary commercial sponsorship for the festival (for the third year) and will exclusively market the vacation packages (tickets + lodging) to the Israeli public for the Masada Opera Festival events. As part of the collaboration between the Opera and Arkia, both entities have worked to set fair prices for lodging at the Dead Sea hotels.


Bimot will sell individual tickets.


The sale of vacation packages for overseas tourists will be handled by Eshet Tours and Amiel Tours.


The Ministry of Tourism has been leading the marketing of the Opera Festival around the world since its inception. Each year, the Festival brings thousands of tourists to Israel and helps brand Israel as a country with cultural richness, offering international events that strengthen the economy and contribute to employment. As part of the support for marketing the festival, the Ministry of Tourism will host dozens of journalists from Europe, who will arrive to cover the Masada Opera Festival and enjoy a unique cultural experience.


Dr. Uzi Landau, Minister of Tourism: "The Masada Opera Festival, in the Judean Desert, near the shores of the Dead Sea, will take place for the fifth time, and this is a source of great pride, considering the size and scope of such a cultural event, and in such a setting. Last year the Festival attracted thousands of tourists, opera lovers who came in order to enjoy the unique production at the foot of the ancient fortress of courage, and thus were exposed to the charms of the music, the history, and nature in Israel. Events and performances of this type are an important vehicle for positioning Israel as an attraction for culture-loving tourists, combining ancient beauty with the modern world, and of course, for increasing the volume of incoming tourism. Therefore, the Ministry of Tourism attaches great importance to investing in such international cultural events throughout the year."


Dov Litvinoff, Head of the Tamar Regional Council: "The Tamar Regional Council is happy to host the Opera at Masada year after year. The tremendous success we have witnessed over the last four years has led us to create a doubly greater challenge – the concurrent production of two different opera performances. This is a tremendous and unique experience that captivates the audience when the orchestra begins playing thunderously, the rainbow of lighting colors blends in with Mount Masada, and the opera singers take flight. I invite you, all the residents of Israel and citizens of the world, of all ages, to come this year and enjoy the exceptional combination in which the soprano's voice shakes the desert silence, under the stars in Mother Nature's cultural hall."

 

"Tosca" at the foot of Masada:

Giacomo Puccini
Libretto: Luigi Illica
Conductor: Daniel Oren
Director: Nicolas Joel
Set Designer: Emanuelle Favre
Costume Designer: Katia Duflot
Lighting Designer: Vinicio Cheli
The Opera Orchestra – The Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion
The Israeli Opera Choir
The Moran Choir

 

Thursday, 4 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Saturday, 6 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Thursday, 11 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
Saturday, 13 June 2015 21:30 (9:30 PM)
All performances at 21:30 (9:30 PM)

 

New Production | Sung in Italian – Surtitles Projected in Hebrew and English
Length of Performance: approximately three hours
Ticket Prices: NIS 400, 500, 750, 950, 1300

 

"Carmina Burana"
Carl Orff
Conductor: James Judd
Director: Michal Znaniecki
Set Designer: Luigi Scoglio
Costume Designer: Magdalena Dabrowska
Lighting and Video Designer: Bogumil Palewicz

 

The Opera Orchestra – The Israel Symphony Orchestra Rishon LeZion
The Israeli Opera Choir
The Ankor Choir
New Production | Sung in Latin – Surtitles Projected in Hebrew and English
Length of Performance: approximately one hour

 

Friday, 5 June 2015 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Friday, 12 June 2015 _ 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Both performances at 22:00 (10:00 PM)
Ticket Prices: NIS 300, 440, 660, 825, 1100

 

To order tickets and packages:
Bimot *6226
Arkia *5758

 

 

· https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGajcxu4I0I&feature=youtu.be


· https://www.youtube..com/watch?v=EaqzKP7idnE&list=UUFNdGuthNR82Oeil6IUai3w

· https://www.youtube..com/watch?v=LOjuOd_2abc&list=UUFNdGuthNR82Oeil6IUai3w
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· https://www.youtube..com/watch?v=XIo2fLPadoo&list=UUFNdGuthNR82Oeil6IUai3w

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 27th edition of the Jerusalem International Book Fair will take place between February 8-12, 2015 at the Jerusalem First Station Complex.

 

The Romanian stand at the Fair is organized by the Ministry of Culture of Romania, books from the following publishing houses being exhibited: Adenium, Cartea Românească, Casa de Pariuri Literare, Casa Radio, Corint, Curtea Veche, Editura Muzeelor Literare, Gama, Gramar, HAC!, Hasefer, Humanitas, Humanitas Fiction, House of Guides, Romanian Cultural Institute Publishing House, Institutul European, Max Blecher, Editura Militară, Monitorul Oficial, Nemira, Niculescu, Orizonturi, Polirom, RAO, Teopiticot, Tracus Arte, Trei, Vivaldi, Vremea.

 

Address and visiting hours of the Book Fair:
The Jerusalem First Station Complex, German Colony - 4 David Remez St.
Sunday, February 8: between 18:00- 22:00
Monday, February 9 - Thursday, February 12: between 10:00-22:00

 

The Romanian writers who will be present at the 2015 Jerusalem International Book Fair are:


• with the support of the Romanian Cultural Institute: Bogdan Hrib, Ioan T. Morar, Horia Gârbea and Sorina Chiper, together with Romanian-born Israeli authors Riri Sylvia Manor, Moshe Idel, Raphael Vago and Costel Safirman.


• with the support of the Romanian Ministry of Culture: Andrei Oișteanu, Adrian Cioflâncă, Cătălin Mihuleac, Carmen Gavrilă and Alexandru Florian, together with Romanian-born Israeli authors Zoltan Terner, Moshe Idel, G. Mosari, Teșu Solomovici, Adrian Graunfels, Bianca Marcovici and Dafna Schoenwald.

 

Also, The National Book Centre - RCI Bucharest will be represented by Bogdan Popescu, director, while Hasefer Publishing House will be represented by Alexandru Marinescu, director and editor-in-chief of the Romanian magazine Realitatea Evreiască.

 

 

 

 

A 55,000 Year Old Human Skull Uncovered in Manot Cave Proves: Modern Humans Migrated from Africa to the Rest of the World Some 65,000 Years Ago.

 

According to researchers from the Tel Aviv University, Israel Antiquities Authority and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, "this is one of the most important discoveries in the study of human evolution"

 

"this is one of the most important discoveries in the study of human evolution"-IAA

 

A team of researchers from the Tel Aviv University, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and the Israel Antiquities Authority reported today in the new issue of Nature Magazine "one of the most important discoveries in the study of human evolution". The matter in question is a 55,000 year old anatomically modern human skull that was found in the Dan David-Manot Cave in the Western Galilee.

 

This rare skull constitutes the earliest fossilized evidence outside of Africa indicating that today's human population originated in Africa and migrated from there c. 65,000 years ago. According to the researchers, the discovery sheds light on one of the most dramatic periods in human evolution: the appearance of modern humans as we know him today.

 

The study of the skull from the Dan David-Manot Cave is a joint project of the Tel Aviv University, Israel Antiquities Authority and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, headed by Professor Israel Hershkovitz, Dr Omry Barzilai and Dr. Ofer Marder, and funded by the Dan David Foundation, Israel Academy of Sciences, Irene Levi Sala CARE Archaeological Foundation, Leakey Foundation and the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

The origin and dispersal of modern humans (Homo sapiens) in the Old World has been a major issue that has engaged scientific research for more than 150 years – ever since the publication of "On the Origin of the Species" by Charles Darwin. Considerable progress has been made in the study of physical anthropology since the 1980's following the introduction of genetic research to the field, which enabled the extraction of DNA from bones and their accurate dating. The results of genetic studies done on modern and fossilized populations in recent years have led researchers to two conclusions: 1) Modern humans originated from an ancient population core, 200,000 years old, from East Africa, which migrated and arrived in our region approximately 100,000 years ago. This hypothesis is supported by fossilized evidence. 2) Today's modern population has its origins in a later wave of migration that happened some 65,000 years ago. This is the period when modern human populations spread from their African origins throughout the Old World and replaced indigenous populations such as the Neanderthals in the Western Asia and Europe. According to this hypothesis proposed by geneticists, these populations comprised the ancient nucleus from which all modern human populations known today have evolved. One of the migration routes by which modern humans spread out across the world passes through the Levant (the Mediterranean basin), which is the only land crossing between Africa and Europe, but until now, no modern human remains that date to the period between 65-45 thousand years ago were discovered. 

 

The research picture regarding the origin of modern humans is now becoming clear following the discovery of a modern human calvarium from Manot Cave. Manot Cave is an active karstic cave (stalactite cave) that was discovered by chance in the Western Galilee in 2008 when it was damaged by a bulldozer during construction works. The cave is located 40 kilometers northeast of the famous Mt. Carmel prehistoric caves.

 

To date, five excavation seasons (2010–2014) have been conducted in the cave on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, during which an impressive archaeological sequence was documented that yielded remains of several prehistoric cultures.

 

The Manot skull was found on a bedrock ledge in a small chamber in the center of the cave. Both its inner and outer surfaces were covered with cave deposits that were dated by means of uranium-thorium to 55,000 YBP. A morphometric analysis of the skull shows it is that of a modern human being with similarities to modern skulls from Africa on the one hand and the ancient skulls of modern humans from Europe on the other.

 

The study involved researchers from the Geological Survey of Israel, Weizmann Institute of Science, Hebrew University, University of Haifa, University of Vienna, Harvard University, Case-Western University, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Columbia University and Simon Fraser University.

 

At the same time as the skull is being studied, preparations are being made for the development of the cave and readying it for visits by the public. The Ma'ale Yosef Regional Council, Moshav Manot and the Jewish National Fund are partners in the aforesaid development.

 

Photo   A fragment of deer skull buried in the cave approximately 30,000 years ago.


Photographic credit: The Israel Antiquities Authority

 

 

 

Chinese Embassy Gala Evening at the Tel Aviv Performing Arts Center

Can modern and ancient Chinese classical music meet comfortably with modern Israeli cantorial music and music from 16th century classical European composers? The answer is a resounding "YES", to judge from the audience response to the gala concert at the opera house at the Tel Aviv Center for The Performing Arts on Tuesday night.

 

The occasion was the opening of a series of musical events by the embassy of the People's Republic of China in Israel. His honor Mr. Lu Kun, Chargé d'Affaires at the embassy was the host and the special occasion was to celebrate the start of the traditional Chinese New Year, the year of the sheep.

 

The concert fell on the night of the 70th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camp. Appropriately, the concert opened with a brief but stirring rendition of the State of Israel's national anthem.

 

The Rishon LeZion Symphony Orchestra, after a successful tour of China, was under the energetic conductorship of guest conductor Andres Mustonen. The synergy was evident throughout the evening. The concert began with two short Chinese pieces: a traditional Chinese melody, "Joy of Spring", followed by Prof. Xuntian He's "Pipa Pattern" which was premiered by the Rishon orchestra in Shanghai in November 2014. Beethoven's symphony #1 in C major opus 21 opened the European segment, and this was followed by "Running to Return", a fantasy for symphony orchestra, tenor singer and shofar. Written by Yoav Shemesh, and sung by the amazing Yonatan Razel, the piece is in Hebrew and includes a segment where the singer blows the shofar (the traditional ram's horn trumpet used in Jewish liturgy). Remarkable, stirring and hauntingly beautiful.

 

After intermission the audience returned to Handel's "Royal Fireworks Music" and finally Beethoven's symphony #5 in C minor opus 67. An unusual sight (and sound) during the "Fireworks" was the conductor himself playing the tambourine!

 

All in all this was concert with an atypical and eclectic choice of music. And it worked. We look forward to more offerings from the Chinese Embassy as they continue with their cross-cultural offerings for Israeli audiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 After electing the anemone as Israel's national flower, along with the current winter rains  and prior to the flourishing of millions of anemones in amazing and colorful carpets, the tenth year of the traditional "Adom Darom" ("Southern Red") blossom festival will take place and last for 4 weeks, from Jan. 29th to Feb. 21st, 2015

 

Fairies and Heroes will wait for families around the flowering focal points, along with live performances by The Idan Raichel Project, Dana Berger and others Farmers markets with local produce, the annual anemones race and lots of activities for the whole family

 

Adom Darom Festival is celebrating its tenth year, with endless red carpets of anemones and a variety of activities in the grassy spaces between the Shikma River and the Bessor River in the northern Negev.

 

The festival will be held over 4 weekends, between Jan. 29th to Feb. 21st, 2015, and will focus this year on "fairies and heroes among the flowers": visitors of the flowering focal points over the weekends could attend free nature activities alongside their familiar and lovable heroes. In addition, there will be a variety of tours throughout the festival: Free guided tours by the JNF and Israel's Nature and Parks Authority, agricultural tours - unique to the area, historical tours and car or on foot guided tours - all leading to the blossoming centers.

 

On Thursdays, visitors can enjoy Adom Darom Live, live performances of leading artists, such as The Idan Raichel Project, Dana Berger, Red Band and others, with discounts for those accommodating in the area.

 

Every Friday will be celebrated by "ShookShokda" – a farmers market in the Shokeda Forest, on the background of the anemones blossom; and on Saturdays there will be a "Water Market" in the Bessor (Eshkol) National Park, near the Bessor's springs in the park; a colorful farmers market produce from the Negev crops; coffee shop in the nature; activities for children, playgrounds and an exciting juggling show for the whole family. In addition, every Saturday it will be possible to enjoy nature painting workshops - "Color in Nature" ("Tzeva BaTeva") - where children paint on huge canvases. Additionally, there will be poetry in the nature – saluting the songs of Shoshana Damari, The Queen of Anemones and the Hebrew Poetry, who passed away a decade ago.

 

During the festival it will be possible to rent bicycles for all ages; taste in the cheese market at the entrance to Kibbutz Be'eri; participate in a fascinating actors activity in the Joe Alon Center in the Lahav Forest: while the inhabitants of the ancient village come to life; enjoy the farmers market at the Kfar Aza junction or from "Pashook" (just a market) at the ostrich farm in front of Eshkol Park; from a family experience in a Brazilian atmosphere at Kibbutz Bror Hayil, and eat and drink at a Brazilian Meat & Boutique Wine in nature and more.

 

  This year, every weekend will enjoy a major theme with special events during the festival:

 

The first weekend (Jan. 29-31, 2015) will emphasis on culture and will include a variety of unique performances: including performances by Dana Berger, Geva Alon, HaTikva 6 and Nathan Goshen. Moreover, there will be poetry installations in the nature saluting the late singer, Shoshana Damari, noting the tenth year of her passing. In addition: "Color in Nature" ("Tzeva Bateva") - painting and art in nature; a Greek show in the Tzeela Dairy; a drum circle at the "El Yaen" ostrich farm; a Hansel and Gretel sweets market at the Water Museum in Nir Am with a sweet atmosphere and pure products of the region along with children's activities, storytelling in the nature and more.


The second weekend (Feb. 5-7, 2015) will emphasis on the love of nature - Tu Bishvat, offering holiday atmosphere activities in the Yonah Experience, including a workshop for planting vegetables and herbs; "Marketito" - a magical fair for the whole family in the Nir Am Water Museum; Mavoch Miriam – the perfume and spices trail in Nir Moshe with a flower planting workshop; an Indian Food Market and dancing in Nevatim.

 

The show of the week: Red Band hosting Marina Maximilian and Carolina in a mind sweeping and unrestrained performance.


The third weekend (Feb. 12-14, 2015) will emphasis on Family Day, Saturday will celebrate the Traditional Anemones March in memory of Shoshana Damari at the Bitronot Ruhama reserve area. At the end of the march there will be an artist's market and food stands. At the Eshkol Park there will be a flying kites happening, in addition to the market on the water which is held every Saturday.

 

More on Saturdays: The El Yaen ostrich farm will hold an exciting family show; "Open terraces fair" at Kibbutz Nirim; "Hutzot HaHevel" at Hevel Shalom with a variety of activities for the whole family – an extreme carting and bicycle tracks, remote control car tracks, mini Jamboree for children, circus show, musical performances and juggling workshops. In Mizpe Gvulot there will be a "Young Farmer" event with an agricultural tour and creative activities with a pioneering atmosphere.


For Valentine's Day - restaurants in the area will offer live musical performances in a romantic atmosphere.


The fourth weekend (Feb. 19-21, 2015) will emphasis on sporting events.


On Friday there will be a single marathon in Be'eri for professionals. Shokeda Forest will host The Second Anemones Race - which combines running and bicycle riding in various trails; and on Saturday there will be a bicycle happening for the whole family, including popular routes and activities for sports enthusiasts. The show of the week: Idan Raichel's Project will perform on the 19th and 20th of February in two shows with his best, loved and known songs, especially for the festival.

 

More in the festival: a wealth of attractions, agricultural tours and activities for children and families at the various sites around the Northern Negev.


Hungry? Dairies in the area are prepared with travelers' picnic baskets - no need to come up with food from home; you can pre-order high-quality picnic baskets for the perfect nature experience, through the website.


Information stations will operate at Yad Mordechai Junction, at Beit Kama Junction and at the flowering sites on Fridays and Saturdays in February, and will provide travelers with maps, information about tours, events and activities during the festival.

 

Smartphone Owners: "Darom Adom" free application is updated with every tour in the Northern Negev. Navigate to the flowering centers, and get updated in real time on various activities at the festival and their exact location, building a whole day trip schedule

 

For further information about the festival, information about accommodation sites, restaurants and attractions:

 

www.habsor.co.il


Details also at the "Darom Adom" Festival on FACEBOOK  - benefits and special offers for those who click Like on the festival's page!

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Another Look – The Restored European Film Project" marks a unique venture whose purpose is to raise awareness to both classic European cinema and the means by which it is preserved. Through the collaboration of the European Union and local European embassies, this project will present twelve films, one from each of its participating nations, all in restored versions and high quality formats. These works were not only chosen for their artistic merit but because they meaningfully reflect on different facets of European film history. Accordingly, they give evidence to the diversity of cinematic practice, as it evolved for over a century.


The film "Manasse" (1925, directing: Jean Mihail, screenplay: Scarlat Froda) will be representing Romania. In light of the anti-Jewish sentiment that pervaded Romania during the first half of the 20th Century, "Manasse" stands out in its boldness as a text that foregrounds and legitimizes Jewish life and customs. An adaptation of a play (1900) by Moise Ronetti-Roman that was banned from theatres following nationalist protests, Jean Mihail's film focuses on the tension between acculturation and separatism which troubled many Jews during the height of modernity.


The full program is published on the website of the Festival: http://anotherlook.co.il/3/. [...]

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guests gathered for a concert on the eve of the last night of Christmas at the chic Herzliya Pituach residence of Her Excellency Ambassador Leena-Kaisa Mikkola, Finnish Ambassador to Israel.

 

The occasion was the visit to Israel for a series of performances by the Tapiola Choir, perhaps one of the world's best known choirs of school children, and who have performed in countries around the world, most recently in Russia, Spain and France. The entire choir is composed of 76 members, 45 of whom were here in Israel for this series of performances. The visit was coordinated by the director of the Israel Camerata in Jerusalem, Ben Shira, who also graced the evening with his presence.

 

In a brief welcome to her guests, the Ambassador expressed her thanks to the choir for coming to Israel and especially for singing in her home for her friends and members of Finnish society in Israel. She added: "I spent Christmas here in the Holy Land, where it is somewhat different to Christmas in Finland. Thank you for singing some of my favorite Christmas melodies". The Ambassador also paid tribute to the organizers, including Maya Shavit, also present, and to Ben Shira.

 

The choir sang several beautiful songs, in charming harmonious melodies under the conductorship of Pasi Hyökki. He was himself once one of the choirboys, so his connections to the Tapiola go back for quite a while. Mr. Hyökki, a musician in his own right, told your www.diplomacy.co.il correspondent that he conducts no less than 3 choirs in Finland, and that he remembers with much joy his previous visit to Israel as a choir member.

 

Mr. Shira also addressed the assembled guests, and told of the concert the choir had given that same morning in the ancient Roman Theater in Caesarea "... at the second best auditorium in Israel ..." . He was pleased to note the children's response to Arab-Jewish coexistence in Jaffa, Nazareth and other spots they visited in the country. We spoke to some of the children, all fluent in English. One young man, in a t-shirt commented on the cold evening: "For us, this is like summer" (!)

 

The entire atmosphere was friendly, casual and welcoming. Guests were offered drinks before the performance, and snacks and drinks after, when there was an opportunity to mingle and chat.

 

Christmas lights and a Christmas tree added to the sparkle of this introduction to Finnish culture. While Hebrew and Finnish are worlds apart, the cultural links between Finland and Israel are close and warm, thanks in no small way to Ambassador Mikkola.

 

Photo Credit  Ofer Amir.

 

 

 

 


In a joint initiative of the Israel State Archives and Israel Antiquities Authority, the Declaration of Independence was removed in a rare event today from the facility where it is stored * The scroll was photographed using an innovative technique developed for photographing the Dead Sea scrolls in order to recreate the document’s original appearance and preserve it for future generations

 

In a joint initiative of the Israel State Archives and Israel Antiquities Authority, the Declaration of Independence was removed in a rare event today (Tuesday) from the facility where it is stored in a special environment meant to ensure its preservation. The Declaration of Independence – one of the country’s most important cultural assets, which proclaims the establishment of the State of Israel and defines its character – was photographed using innovative technology developed especially for the Dead Sea scrolls, one of the most ancient and important cultural assets of the people of Israel. The photography was done in order to recreate the original appearance of the Declaration of Independence and preserve it for future generations.  

 

The scroll was photographed in the LunderDead Sea Scrolls Conservation Laboratory of the Israel Antiquities Authority, using an advanced multi-spectral photographic system that allows shooting different exposures at a number of wavelengths – from the visible region to the near infrared region of the spectrum. The advanced photography will provide information regarding the texture of the material from which the scroll is made, its ink and topography (surface).

 

The combination of exposures in the visible range will provide a high quality and exact color photograph identical to the Declaration of Independence, while exposures in the near infrared region will allow reading written characters appearing on the document which have faded over time. With this innovative system a precise and clear copy of the Declaration of Independence was created, as it was when originally signed, prior to the ravages of time that are now visible on it.

 

Besides the advanced documentation, the photography will facilitate assessing the current condition of the Declaration of Independence, and in that way be of assistance in mapping out the necessary measures for preserving the scroll for future generations.

 

Dr. Yaacov Lozowick, the State Archivist, noted that “Today the scroll is stored in an environment with special lighting and temperature conditions, in a secure and guarded facility of the Israel State Archives. Until a decision is made regarding how the scroll is to be exhibited to the public, we will continue performing various operations aimed at documenting, revealing and preserving the scroll for future generations. Today’s photography is another step in this process after last year when the archive, with the assistance of the Israel National Heritage – Landmarks program, digitally photographed the scroll in collaboration with Google.”

 

Pnina Shor, director of the Dead Sea Scrolls Project at the Israel Antiquities Authority, said, "With the unique technology we developed at the Israel Antiquities Authority together with the best scientists in the world, and generous assistance of the Leon Levy and Arcadia Foundations, we are happy to help not only in preserving the material heritage from the distant past but the recent cultural heritage as well. It is exciting and symbolic to document the Declaration of Independence today, one of the cornerstones of the State of Israel, with technology developed specifically for the Dead Sea scrolls - the earliest Hebrew texts, two thousand years old, which were first discovered on the eve of the establishment of the state, at the time when the Declaration of Independence was written."

 

Dr. Mordechai Naor is a writer and researcher of the history of Israel. In his recently published book "Great Friday", describing the ceremony proclaiming the state and the preparation of the Declaration of Independence, he presents both well-known and little-known details about the scroll, the writing of which was not completed until the time of the historic ceremony, and the problems that arose during the signing. For example, he mentioned, “Because the ceremony was held in Tel Aviv, some of the signatories were unable to arrive because Jerusalem was under siege, and they signed the scroll only a month later, in “spaces” that were left them specifically for this purpose. He also said, “Because the guest lists have not been found to this day, it is not known exactly who the 300 individuals were that were invited to the ceremony proclaiming the state.  One person that was almost not allowed to enter was the designated Minister of Justice Pinchas Rosenblüth (Rosen) who forgot to bring his invitation. It was only after Ze'ev Sherf, Secretary of the Situation Committee, intervened was he permitted to enter and thus was also able to sign the Declaration of Independence.”

 

The Declaration of Independence is the most important document created in the State of Israel. It constitutes the first document reflecting Jewish sovereignty since the time of the Hasmonean kingdom, and it is probably the first document that reflects a desire for sovereignty achieved by a democratic consensus. Representatives of various political camps in the Yishuv negotiated every idea and word in it until they reached an agreed upon text. The debate continued until close to the signing ceremony itself. The scroll was read as a proclamation of independence, on Friday, the 5th day of Ayar, 5708 (May 14, 1948) in the Tel Aviv Museum then located at 16 Rothschild Street, in the house of the city’s first mayor, Meir Dizengoff. Twenty-five members of the Provisional State Council signed the declaration and twelve others who were in besieged Jerusalem signed it later. The scroll is 117 cm long and 29.7 cm wide. It is made in three parts, and bound on the side with an interwoven thread and a wax seal.

 

Photographic credit: Amos Ben Gershom, GPO  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Delve deeper into the Bible by learning about the lives of the people who populated the Ancient Near East at the award-winning Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem. Founded by the late Dr. Elie Borowski and his wife Batya, the Bible Lands Museum's extensive collection helps visitors gain a more intimate understanding of the Bible by discovering the daily practices of people who lived during that period: how they cooked, how they worshiped, how they buried their dead, how they made weapons, and how they wore jewelery, among many other aspects.


The Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem (BLMJ) is located on Museum Row, and the collection draws from the vast geographic area reaching from Afghanistan in the east to the Mediterranean Sea in the west, from the Caucasian mountains in the north to Nubia (today's Sudan) in the south.


As you follow the path of Abraham from Ur through today's Israel into Egypt, you can meet the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Hittites, and Phoenicians, and explore how they lived in the Fertile Crescent, the cradle of civilization.
The collection dates from the dawn of civilization, focusing on the pre-historic era 6,000 years ago to the Byzantine Era, up until 1450 CE. Through interactive exhibitions, the museum also aims to draw parallels among the monotheistic religions and give visitors a better understanding of the ancient cultures in this region that gave birth to the Bible.

 

21 Stefan Wise St., Museum Row

Open 7 Days a week!

P.O. Box 4670, Jerusalem 9104601

Tel: 972-2-5611066 | Fax: 972-2-5638228

Contact us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Web: www.blmj.org

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 9:30 - 17:30

Wednesday 9:30 - 21:30

Friday, Saturday, Holiday Eves 10:00 - 14:00

Jewish Holidays Closed

*All programs subject to change.

 

Exhibitions:
Coming soon - New Exhibition - By the Rivers of Babylon
Opening: February 1st, 2015
Special preview on Wednesdays 17:00 - 19:30 during January!

 

By the Rivers of Babylon is a story of survival.
This exhibition traces the epic saga of the Judean people from Jerusalem, capital of the Judeans in 604 BCE through their rebuilding of their lives by the rivers of Babylon in Al Yahudu, literally, the City of Judah.
Through never before seen ancient documents, we follow the families and their journey from the siege of the city and the destruction of the Temple, to their exile and resettlement in Babylonia; tracing the lives of the first generations who witnessed the history that irrevocably changed the future of the Jewish people.

 

New Display: DIONYSUS: Wine & Divine
A brief encounter with the god of wine, intoxication and ecstasy, and his frenzied entourage in this display of enchanting artifacts, many of which are being exhibited for the first time.

 

Permanent Exhibition
The Bible Lands Museum Jerusalem houses one of the world's most important collections of ancient Near Eastern artifacts, illustrating the world of the Hittites, the Phoenicians, the civilizations of Greece and Rome and the importance of Canaan, Judea and Israel at the cross-roads of the ancient world.

 

Glories of Ancient Greece - Closing: April 2015
The oldest jewelry in the museum is found in this exhibition, part of a large collection of silver and gold items, which also includes a magnificent gold wreath from the Hellenistic period, necklaces, rare gold and crystal earrings and beautiful bracelets. Gold and silver were relatively rare in ancient Greece until Alexander the Great's successful campaign against the Persians, when his conquest resulted in tremendous amount of gold and silver booty flowing into Greece, some of which ended up in the museum's collection. The exhibit also features an extensive collection of Greek pottery from over 3,500 years ago, with vases portraying scenes from Greek mythology that represented the height of artistic ingenuity at the time.

 

Roman Fresco Room
From Pompeii to Jerusalem: The frescoes in this collection are believed to be from the villas of Boscotrecase, a suburb of Pompeii that was frozen in time with the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 CE. Sealed beneath the lava, they were preserved for centuries and still retain their vibrant colors and fine detailed painting. The beautiful frescoes, made in the Roman technique of wet plaster painting, portray magical panoramic views of nature, mythology, erotica and more. One of the prominent pieces from the collection is the "Erotic Scene of a Nude Nymph." *On view by request only.

 

Daily Guided Tours: Free with Museum admission
Sunday - Friday English 10:30, Hebrew 11:00
Additional tour on Wednesdays English 17:30, Hebrew 18:00
Saturday Hebrew 11:30
Reserve tours in additional languages and groups in advance: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Special Friday:
Mother Tongue
Guided Tours in the Languages of the Jewish People, inspired by the New Exhibition - By the Rivers of Babylon
Friday, January 23, at 11:00
A-Groisse-Metzie – Guided tour in Yiddish
From Abraham to the Babylonian Exile - through the museum galleries and the new exhibition.
Guide: Daniel Ashkenazi

 

Lectures:
Wednesday at 19:30 | Free with Museum admission*
7/1/15 - "Thus Judah was exiled from its Land" - The Last Days of the Kingdom of Judah and its Relations with Babylon, Prof. Mordechai Cogan, Hebrew Univ., Hebrew
14/1/15 - Between the Myth of the Empty Land and the Myth of the Mass Return: A Historical View on Judah During the Babylonian Exile, Prof. Oded Lipschits, Tel Aviv Univ., Hebrew (There might be a delay in lecture beginning hour).
21/1/15 - By the Rivers of Babylon" (Psalms 137) – Trauma and Post Traumatic Memory, Prof. Yair Zakovitch, Hebrew Univ. Hebrew
28/1/15 – The Babylonian Exile: The First Generations, Prof. Israel Ephal, Hebrew Univ., Hebrew

 

Courses
BLMJ presents fascinating courses featuring top experts and lecturers.

A New Jerusalem in Babylon
Opens: February 25, for 9 meetings (2 lectures per meeting).
Wednesdays 16:00-19:00
The village of the Jews, Al-Yahudu, was the Babylonian name for Jerusalem in Judah, as well as a town of Judean exiles in Babylonia, now known to us from a new archive of documents that will have their world premier in the exhibition "By the Rivers of Babylon" at the BLMJ.
Course participants will have the unique opportunity to explore these phenomenal documents, reading from the original cuneiform text. Experience first hand the lives and times of the Judean exiles following their family life and their working life in the date plantations, barley fields and animals.
No previous knowledge of Akkadian or Cuneiform required.
Course in Hebrew.

 

Jerusalem in Babylonia – Academic Conference
in collaboration with The Israeli Society for Assyriology and Ancient Near Eastern Studies and The Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center
in conjunction with the exhibition By the Rivers of Babylon
2-3 February 2015
Lectures and a special program at the Babylonian Jewry Heritage Center in Or Yehudah
The conference will provide a first glance at the life and times of a Jewish community at the very start of the Babylonian Diaspora.
Speakers include: Irving Finkel, The British Museum, Laurie Pearce, University of California, Berkley, Paul-Alain Beaulieu, University of Toronto, Ron Zadok, Tel-Aviv University, Wayne Horowitz, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

Conducted in Hebrew and English
Advanced registration required. Limited places available: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 02-5611066
Price: 150 NIS, 140 NIS (OAPs and students, upon presentation of identity card)
With the support of: The CAENO Foundation, Naomi and Peter Neustadter, and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

 

Weekend Family Fun
Saturdays | 10:00 – 14:00 | Free admission for children!
Self-guided activity
*Treasure Hunt (ages 6-12(
*Tour booklets for children (ages 4-6)
*Mummy Kit – Secrets of Ancient Egypt
Ideal for Shabbat observant families (when tickets purchased in advance)

 

Museum Shop
Unique and original gifts by leading Israeli designers
Gifts for the holidays * Jewelry * Judaica * Games * Replicas * Catalogues and books.
Contact us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | www.blmj.org/catalog/ | www.facebook.com/BLMJ.Shop

 

Celebrate your next event with us!
Bar/Bat Mitzvahs
Hold your next event at the Museum and enjoy a unique atmosphere and a once in a lifetime experience including exclusive tours of the Museum and excellent catering.
King for a Day – The young Bar/Bat Mitzvah guides family and guests in a special tour. Linking the Chain of Generations – An enchanting tour of the Museum ideal for children and adults.
After the Kotel – Enjoy a series of creative activities based on Bible stories, Jewish holidays and more.
Conferences, Corporate Events and Receptions
Host your next business or private event at the BLMJ. Exclusive use of the Museum, auditorium, reception halls and the Biblical Garden can all be made available just for you.
For further information and reservations: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Weddings, Private Dinners and Events from the Simple to the Sublime
Exclusive events in a unique atmosphere - indoor and outdoor options in our marquee or the Biblical Garden (weather permitting).
For further details please contact: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. | www.chic-events.co.il
+972-2-5630058

 

Make Notice:
NEW PARKING ARRANGEMENTS - parking lot between the BLMJ and the Israel Museum is free for museum visitors ONLY. Simply present your museum entrance ticket when exiting the lot to park for free. Please remember to keep your entrance ticket!
Stopping by to pick up holiday gifts in out Gift Shop? Just let us know and we will be glad to provide you with a parking pass with your purchase.
Enjoy special discounts on museum entrance fees. Bring your paid ticket receipt from the BLMJ to the Israel Museum or the Bloomfield Science Museum, to receive discounts on entrance within the same week.

Your BLMJ membership or tickets also grant you discounted entrance at the Israel Children's Museum in Holon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Fragment of a 1,600 Year Old Glass Bracelet, Adorned with Menorah Motifs, was Uncovered during Hanukkah in the Mount Carmel National Park

 

The discovery was made in an excavation by the Israel Antiquities Authority prior to the construction of a reservoir for the city of Yoqneʽam, at the initiative of the Mekorot Company

 

A fragment of a bracelet bearing motifs of the seven-branched candelabrum (menorah) from the Second Temple was discovered during the Hanukkah holiday in work the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted near Eliakim, in the Mount Carmel National Park. Archaeological excavations were carried out there in recent weeks prior to the construction of a water reservoir for the city of Yoqneʽam, at the initiative of the Mekorot Company

 

During the excavation an industrial region and refuse pits were exposed which were part of a large settlement that existed in the Late Roman and Early Byzantine periods (end of the fourth century–beginning of the fifth century CE).

 

According to Limor Talmi and Dan Kirzner, excavation directors on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "Last Thursday, at the end of the excavation, we began the initial processing of the finds. While examining the contents of one of the boxes which contained hundreds of glass fragments that had been discarded in the refuse pit, we found to our surprise a small fragment of a bracelet. Naturally it was extremely dirty, but still, you could see it was decorated. After cleaning, we were excited to discover that the bracelet, which is made of turquoise colored glass, is decorated with symbols of the seven-branched menorah – the same menorah which according to tradition was kept alight in the Temple for eight days by means of a single cruse of oil." The researchers said, "It seems that the bracelet was embossed with the decoration while the glass was still hot. Stamped impressions of two menorot survived on the small fragment that was found – one a plain seven-branched menorah, of which only the surface of the menorah is visible and the other one consisting of a seven-branched menorah with flames depicted above its branches."

 

According to Yael Gorin-Rosen, head of the Ancient Glass Department of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "Bracelets and pendants made of glass that are decorated with symbols of a menorah or lion or different images of gods and animals, are known during these periods in Israel, Lebanon and Syria. So far, three fragments of bracelets with menorah decorations have been discovered in archaeological excavations in the country: in an excavation at Bab el-Hawa in the northern Golan Heights, at Banias, and another bracelet that was discovered years ago in the excavations at Shiqmona, Haifa. The Shiqmona bracelet is also adorned with an image of a menorah that has flames above it." Rosen-Gorin added, "Jewelry such as this was found in excavations, usually in the context of funerary offerings. It is unusual to find such objects in settlement strata, and even rarer to discover them in an ancient refuse pit." 

 

According to the researchers, "The question now is - Is this definite proof that Jews lived in the ancient settlement? Perhaps, but it is also possible that Samaritans resided there or a pagan or Christian population. Another hypothesis suggests that the bracelet comes from a workshop operating in the area and was intended for other markets. This possibility is based on other glass debris that was exposed in the refuse pit, among them beads and bracelets. Glass jewelry was used extensively in the Late Roman period and we can reasonably assume that those items that were specially decorated were more expensive than the plain unornamented ones. The refuse that was discovered in the pit included numerous glass vessels and fragments of glass window panes, as well as a selection of jewelry, indicating of a population that lived a life of comfort and affluence. Conceivably, the large industrial area that was located there supported the residents of the nearby settlement."


In recent years the national water company, Mekorot, initiated the construction of a new reservoir in order to provide water to the region of Yoqneʽam and the upper Carmel. The optimal location, which was selected after examining alternatives together with the Nature and Parks Authority and the Jewish National Fund, was a declared antiquities site. Mekorot financed the activities of the Israel Antiquities Authority in the region and there is currently an approved detailed plan that includes landscape rehabilitation which is slated to receive a building permit.

 

 Photographic credit: Yoli Shwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority:
 Picture of the fragment of a glass bracelet adorned with menorah symbols.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ambassador of the Netherlands, Caspar Veldkamp, opened a combined photo exhibition of the World Press Photo and Local Testimony photography contests. The annual photo journalism exhibition is the largest and most important of its kind in Israel and can be visited from December 16 until January 23, 2015, at the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel Aviv.

 

The World Press Photo exhibition, curated by the World Press Photo Foundation from Amsterdam, is considered to be the world's most prestigious exhibition of international photography. Local Testimony is an annual exhibition that features the best documentary and press photos from Israel and the Palestinian territories.

 

Photo journalists from around the world participated in the World Press Photo contest, presenting the best press and documentary photography from the past year. Contributions of this year were selected from 98,671 pictures submitted by 5,754 photographers from 132 different countries. The jury awarded prizes in different categories: politics and society, culture and art, nature and the environment and sports, as well as portraits.

 

This year's opening event gives special attention to human rights, in particular freedom of expression. Several human rights organizations have been invited to the opening. In his opening speech, Ambassador Veldkamp emphasised that "World Press Photo stands for freedom of expression. This freedom is not self-evident. World Press Photo continues to present challenging photography from around the world. I am proud that the contest, which originated in the Netherlands, is able to bring this exhibition to Israel for the 15th time now."

 

​Credit photo: Rafi Delouya​

 

 

 

 

 

Archaeologists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archaeology have discovered a monumental entryway to the Herodian Hilltop Palace at Herodium National Park. The unique complex was uncovered during excavations by The Herodium Expedition in Memory of Ehud Netzer over the past year, as part of a project to develop the site for tourism.

The main feature of the entryway is an impressive corridor with a complex system of arches spanning its width on three separate levels. These arches buttressed the corridor's massive side-walls, allowing the King and his entourage direct passage into the Palace Courtyard. Thanks to the supporting arches, the 20-meter long and 6-meter wide corridor has been preserved to a height of 20 meters.

 

The Hebrew University archaeologists - Roi Porat, Yakov Kalman and Rachel Chachy - suggest that the corridor was built as part of Herod's plan to turn Herodium into a massive artificial volcano-shaped hill, a vast and impressive monument designed to commemorate the architect-King.

 

Surprisingly, during the course of the excavations, it became evident that the arched corridor was never actually in use, as prior to its completion it became redundant. This appears to have happened when Herod, aware of his impending death, decided to convert the whole hilltop complex into a massive memorial mound, a royal burial monument on an epic scale.

 

Whatever the case, the corridor was back-filled during the construction of the massive artificial hill at the end of Herod's reign. The upper section of a new monumental stairway stretching from the hill's base to its peak, constructed during the course of this building phase, appears to have been built over it.

 

The excavators point out that not only was the arched corridor covered over in the course of the construction of the hill-monument, but also all the structures earlier built by Herod on the hill's slopes, including the Royal Theater uncovered by the expedition in 2008, while still led by Prof. Ehud Netzer, since deceased.

 

The only edifice not covered over was the splendid mausoleum-style structure, identified by Netzer and the expedition as Herod's burial-place. Together with the monumental cone-shaped hill, this constituted the unique Herodian Royal burial-complex.

 

During the course of the current excavations, the original impressive palace vestibule, blocked when the corridor became redundant, was also exposed. This entry-room, decorated with splendid painted frescoes, had a magnificent entryway leading into it, and offered evidence of the rebel occupation during the Great Revolt (66-71 CE), including Jewish Revolt coinage and crude temporary structures.

 

In addition, the excavations in the arched corridor also turned up impressive evidence from the Bar Kokhba Revolt period (132-135/6 CE): hidden tunnels dug on the site by the rebels as part of the guerilla warfare they waged against the Romans. Supported in part by wooden beams, these tunnels exited from the hilltop fortress by way of the corridor's walls, through openings hidden in the corridor. One of the tunnels revealed a well-preserved construction of 20 or so cypress-wood branches, arranged in a cross-weave pattern to support the tunnel's roof.

 

In the future, according to Mr. Shaul Goldstein, Director of Israel's Nature and Parks Authority, the excavation of the arched corridor will allow visitors direct access to the Herodium hilltop palace-fortress, in the same way that Herod entered it two thousand years ago. There are also plans to provide tourists direct access from the structures on the slope, the royal theater and the mausoleum, via the earlier monumental stairway, to the hilltop palace.

 

The Israel Nature and Parks Authority, the Heritage and Commemoration Department of the Prime Minister's Office, the Israel Antiquities Authority, and the Etzion Bloc Regional Council and Civilian Administration are all co-partners in the development of the Herodium.

 

Ehud Netzer was a world-renowned professor at the Hebrew University's Institute of Archaeology. Following several decades of excavations at the Herodium, Netzer discovered the tomb of Herod the Great in 2007. He died in 2010 at age 76 after being injured in a fall at the Heroudium archaeological site.

 

The Hebrew University's Institute of Archaeology, founded in 1934, has shaped many of the current paradigms in Israeli archaeology. In addition to its many archaeological endeavors at major prehistoric and historic sites, it serves as a teaching and training institution within the Hebrew University's Faculty of Humanities and as a center for interdisciplinary research. The Institute's academic programs include studies for B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in prehistoric, biblical, and classical archaeology, Civilizations of the Ancient Near East, and Computerized Archaeology.

 

Aerial photo of Herodium complex Copyright: Tatzpit Aerial Photography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Master Kobe will arrive to Israel with two KRAV MAGA missions from Brazil in January 7. 2015 – The groups will hold here training and get a close knowledge on the "real Israel".
"Master Kobi Lichtenstein" (so he is being called in the continent), will arrive along with two groups (from his 10,000 of his students) to visit Israel, training the Krav Maga in Historic Places and hearing about its history.


The groups will be training on the top of Masada (a symbol of heroism Jewish history), in the "Wingate Institute", in Tiberias, and will visit Imi Lichtenfeld's grave in Netanya (Imi was the founder of the Krav Maga and the spiritual father of this art).


Kobi Lichtenstein is an Israeli Krav Maga instructor that during the last twenty years became to be the guru of Krav Maga in South America, where he founded the Krav Maga Federation which is recognized as one of the largest unions in Krav Maga and certified by the government and the establishment in Brazil and in most of the continent,


Master Kobi authorized and trained hundreds of instructors and trainers who teach in 17 districts in the continent of South America, Special Forces and elite forces of the army and police security Krav Maga system. South American Federation of Krav Maga. There are now over 150 of Krav Maga training centers, which are scattered across the continent.


Master Kobi proudly points out that in all of the training centers an Israeli flag is located next to the state or province flag (photos attached). Master KobI also mentions that training for Certification (takes about 4 years) includes 30 hours of History of Israel until the establishment of Israel state and its way of everyday survival, through threat of surrounding Arab countries and every day's terrorism threats.

 

Master Kobi comes every year with a group of instructors and students of Krav Maga from South America to Israel (so far visited with about 1,000 of his disciples in Israel) - "I would like people here know the real Israel on broad views, innovation, modernization and its advanced technology instead of the negative image presenting them through the hostile media ".

Kobi Lichtenstein was born in 1964, in the city of Rechovot, Israel. At the age of three, he began his Krav Maga training with the creator of the art, Imi Lichtenfeld.


Accepted in class only for a trial period, due to his young age, he was quickly approved by his master, who soon "adopted" him. Being renowned as a prodigy, he became notorious to the press at age six. His life was dedicated to Krav Maga, his movements and instincts were shaped by the technique of this art, and at the age of 15, he began teaching his first classes.
He was the one responsible for all the Krav Maga teaching in the central-south region of Israel, therefore, having millions of students. An ex-combatant in the War of 1982, he joined innumerous special missions of the Israeli Army, worked in National Security Services and concluded his MBA in National Security and Terror by the University Hod Hasharon in Israel, with a partnership with Newport University in California.


In 1990, Master Kobi arrived in Brazil with the support of master Imi, with the goal of divulging, spreading, and teaching Krav Maga in South America.
He established himself in Rio de Janeiro and founded the Brazilian Association of Krav Maga, which is recognized by the Secretary of Sports and the Ministry of Education of the Brazilian Government.


During the last twenty years in Brazil, Master Kobi has been graduating instructors who today teach in many gyms in different Brazilian states. He supervises the practice and divulgence of Krav Maga, keeping a high ethical and technical level of his instructors and students, following the suggested steps by his master and creator of Krav Maga.
As a Krav Maga master and a specialist in security, he has already taught courses to several military, police and private security forces. The training for the security business has been reaching excellent results and the courses have been requested by almost all Brazilian states and by countries in South America.


In May 2010, Master Kobe organized the largest international event of Krav Maga, bringing to Rio de Janeiro the main teachers of Krav Maga in the world and bringing together delegations from 28 countries during five days of intense programming, including seminars, lectures, workshops, and cultural event evening of tributes, and still getting the world record for"Greatest lesson in self defense in the world" by the official auditor's of Guinness Records. The grandeur of the event put Rio de Janeiro on the world stage of sport,praised the hospitality and professionalism that drive the work of master Kobi in Brazil in the last 20 years.


The conception of Krav Maga reveals a path that enables anyone to exert their right to life, even with the violence that surrounds us. It is the only fighting technique with a worldwide recognition as an art of self defense and not as a martial art.
There are no rules or competitions, because the techniques envision self-defense in real-life situations. With simple, fast and objective responses to violent daily life situations, it shows the common citizen how to defend himself,

 

 

 

 

Seventy students from northern Israel help at archaeological excavations of the biblical Magdala.

 

Migdal, Tuesday, December 2th, 2014. - Seventy students from Hardof Junior High School of Israel help at the excavation area and restore the first century city of Magdala, together with Christian Volunteers from Mexico, USA and Spain. The teenagers arrived last Sunday to camp until Thursday in order to help as much as possible at the archaeological Park of Magdala.

 

The excavation is supervised by the Israel Antiquities Authority and archaeologists from Mexico. The archaeological activity is taking place at the ancient market of Magdala. The purpose is to dig, draw and clarify the map of the market of Magdala. 20% of Magdala has being excavated and includes a First Century Synagogue, dated by minted coins from 29 A.C, Mansion and Miqva'ot, ritual baths, feed by the subterranean spring water housed within two villas, and the Bimah or Magdala Stone, which is believed to represent the Holy Place in the Second Temple.

 

Until now, more than 1000 volunteers from all denominations around the world have been participating at the archeological excavations and care of Magdala in the last five years, since 2009.

 

"For us as Christians it is amazing to bring to life Magdala, since 2000 years ago the city was covered and now it is vibrant again. Magdala is the place where all can gather together in peace, and where Jewish and Christians meets in History and Faith." commented the pioneer of Magdala, Fr Juan Solana LC.

 

Magdala has an Archaeological Park and interdenominational worship center, DUC IN ALTUM, already open daily for visitors. More than 15,000 tourists have visited Magdala during their stay in the Holy Land. Magdala, as a tourist and cultural site expects to be one of the favorite places to visit in the Galilee area.

 

www.magdala.org
@MagdalaCenter
#Magdala
About the archaeological findings:

 

Magdala (near present day Migdal) is located on the western coastline of the Sea of Galilee (Kinneret) and at the eastern foothills of Mount Arbel. The site has been identified with the ancient city of Migdal Nunia (Hebrew meaning: fish tower), a place that was also known as Taricheae (Greek meaning: the place of salted fish). It was the largest urban center on the western coast of the Sea of Galilee until the founding of Tiberias in 19 CE. Archeological excavations exposed a large portion of the northern quarter of Magdala primarily from the first Century.

 

Magdala is mentioned in both Jewish and Christian sources. Magdala is known traditionally in Christian sources as the birthplace of Mary Magdalene. Mary Magdalene was the first eyewitness of the risen Christ and was commissioned by Jesus to inform the disciples of His resurrection. Magdala was also the home and main headquarters of Yosef ben Matityahu (the historian known as Josephus Flavius). He was governor of Galilee during the time of the Great Jewish Revolt (66-73 CE).

 

In the archaeological area three Mikva'ot, or ritual purification baths, housed within two highly developed buildings have been discovered. Purification in Jewish tradition is important, as it is believed to cleanse both the body and the soul. The Mikva'ot found at Magdala are two meters deep and are the only ones found from this time period that are fed by a natural water source.

 

In another area of the archaeological zone, archaeologists discovered a port, which was used for the fishing industry prominent in Magdala. It is very probable that fishermen landed at this port to unload their fish and other products. Nearby, a series of pools was discovered. These pools were likely used to clean and preserve fish that would be sold in the market. The archaeological excavations suggest that the fishing industry was Magdala's primary economic activity. Magdala was located in close proximity to the Via Maris, the main transportation artery throughout the Middle East. The proximity to the Via Maris, the fertile land surrounding the city, and the thriving fishing industry made Magdala one of the most important cities on the Sea of Galilee during the first century.

 

Address: Migdal Junction, P.O. Box 36614950


More information about the site: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the occasion of the National Day of Romania, The Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv and the Embassy of Romania to the State of Israel are proud to invite you to the opening of the exhibition "Romania and Israel in the colours of nature", on December 11, 2014 at 6 p.m. The event, organized in collaboration with the Israeli art group "Tzeva BaTeva", will include also a music program performed by Amir Gad and Adam Frumkin, students of The Lin and Ted Arison Israel Conservatory of Music and will take place at the Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv (8 Shaul HaMelech Blvd, Beit Amot Mishpat, 6th floor).


The works collected in this exhibition hosted by RCI Tel Aviv, have been created in art workshops in Romania and Israel by 49 artists, members of the group. The exhibition includes art works by: Monica Alon, Yaffa Anavi, Shushu (Vunsh) Barak, Shosh Ben Bassat, Hana Belo, Jacob Ben David, Moshe Ben-Yefet, Sol Berko, Ruth Brown, Perach Cohen, Miriam Cojocaru, Rachel Kvodi Cordova, Ilana Doron, Mordechai Paul Fleischer, Helen Francis, Silvia Ginsberg, Meir Glick, Rachel Hamburger, Clara Herșcovici, Yaffa Jaeger, Livia Kessler, Shosh Indyk, Shlomo Levi, Pearl Lugassi, Miriam Melzer, Shulamit Mizrachi, Bakal Nachshon Nitzi, Yitzhak Nir, Jacob Pisante, Diana Pomeranz, Miriam Ravia, Batia Regev, Etti Regev, Mimi Rozenberg, Devorah Rosen, Ariela Gonda Shaked, Yardena Sharabi, Leah Shavit, Nili May-Tal, Silvia Waisberg, Schmukler Yoel, Eva Shalit, Irit Shany, Abraham Shemi-Shoham, Shosh Szilagy, Gabrielle Touboul, Sarah Weber, Shoshana Weingarten, Sarah Zivony.


Greetings by: Dr. Simona Tanasescu, art critic and representative of the Romanian Ministry of Culture, Dr. Gina Pana, director of RCI Tel Aviv, Jacob Ben David, founder of the "Tzeva BaTeva" art group.


RCI Tel Aviv would like to thank Mrs. Livia Kessler, the promoter of this collaboration project with "Tzeva BaTeva", for her valuable support in organizing this exhibition. [...]

 

 

 

 

Out of the Circle Celebrates 50 Years of Dance and Choreography in Israel and Suzanne Dellal Centre's 25th Anniversary

 

Jerusalem, December 2, 2014 — The art of staged dance in Israel has undergone a long journey to become one of the country's most successful performing arts disciplines. Out of the Circle: The Art of Dance in Israel, a new exhibition opening on December 2, 2014, at The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, celebrates Israeli dance and choreography since the 1920s and honors two of Israel's most prominent dance institutions on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Batsheva Dance Company and the 25th anniversary of the Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre. In conjunction with the exhibition, the Museum will host a series of dance performances by some of today's foremost artists in the field, including Yasmeen Godder, Roy Assaf, Yossi Berg, Oded Graf, and Renana Raz, among others.


Through photographs, videos, posters, drawings, and other ephemera, Out of the Circle explores critical milestones in the development of contemporary dance in Israel through the central theme of the circle. The earliest form of collective Israeli dance can be traced back to the hora circle dance of the young pioneers who came to Israel at the start of the 20th century and established the first kibbutzim. The hora reinforced a sense of brotherhood and group unity, a feeling strengthened by the physical closeness of the dancers as they joined hands. As the circle dance grew to become a symbol of Israel, it contributed an important element to the creation of a cultural identity that was formed well before the establishment of the Israeli State.
"The circle, which has no beginning and no end, is the great cross-cultural equalizer," said James S. Snyder, the Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "Out of the Circle embodies the beauty of the world of Israeli dance, adding another chapter to the history of modern Israeli culture and society."

 

 

 The motif of the circle mirrors the evolution of modern Israeli society. The circle alternately crystalizes and breaks, illuminating tensions between the individual and the group; between agricultural myth and urban reality; between open and enclosed space; between ordinary movements and gestures of pathos. The circle is at once a clear form of order and equality, yet it is also demanding and threatening to the individual in its overpowering closure. Exemplifying these tensions is Ohad Naharin's groundbreaking dance Echad Mi Yodea of 1990—the year he was appointed artistic director of Batsheva—which opens the exhibition as a prologue.

 

Israel's early dance performers and choreographers emigrated from Europe to pre-State Israel in the 1920s and 30s, importing Expressionist Dance from Germany and Austria, which would have a formative impact on the nascent scene in Israel. It was during this time that Baruch Agadati, considered a pioneer of "the new dance in Israel," created and performed compositions featuring mosaic of popular characters found in the Israeli landscape, including Biblical personalities, pioneers, Yemenite Jews, and Jaffa Arabs, all wearing costumes that he designed. Three drawings of Agadati by such renowned Russian Constructivists as Natalia Goncharova and Mikhail Larionov are presented in the exhibition.


Arriving in 1936, dance visionary Gertrud Kraus continued the European mode of expressionistic dance. Kraus and her contemporaries modified and evolved the medium to incorporate features of their newly adopted country: light, open space, a search for commonality, and the excitement of being "at one with the homeland."


Many photographers who chronicled these dance pioneers also arrived from Central Europe. Among them was Alfons Himmelreich, who immigrated to pre-State Israel where he began photographing Tel Aviv's burgeoning modern dance scene. His artistic style, influenced by German art and photography of the time, incorporates contrasting light and shadow to illustrate the drama and emotion of the dancers.


The founding of the Batsheva Dance Company in 1964, and other prominent companies in the 1960s and 70s, reflects the growing professionalism and institutionalizing of the art of Israeli dance. This was followed by a growing shift in Israel from the collective "us" toward a more individual "me," and, as the circle fell apart, dancers began to search for their private voices and left the dance-troupe circle in favor of personal creativity in the work of such choreographers as Rina Schenfeld, Moshe Efrati, Liat Dror, and Nir Ben Gal.

 

"Israeli dance artists today look outward to the world and inward to timeless human concerns," said Talia Amar, Curator of Interdisciplinary Art at the Israel Museum and curator of the exhibition. "Against the background of modernist Western traditions such as expressionism, the modern American dance of Martha Graham, and Pina Bausch's dance theatre, along with the search for ethnic roots, dance in Israel is no longer attempting to make and define "Israeli Dance"—an elusive term in any case. Today it is global: challenging boundaries—whether national borders or the confines of the stage—and inhabiting realms both real and metaphorical, both in and out of the circle."

 

 

 

 Out of the Circle: The Art of Dance in Israel is on view from December 2, 2014 through February 28, 2015.

 

About the Suzanne Dellal Centre


The Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre is Israel's home for dance and its premiere presenter of Israeli and international contemporary dance. The Centre's mission to cultivate, support, and promote the art of contemporary dance in Israel is realized through events, festivals, and workshops and by its commitment to presenting top-quality Israeli and international choreographers. The Centre also creates world-class dance productions and educational activities and has launched many innovative programs in support of emerging artists and new works. The Centre was established in 1989 by the Dellal family of London in honor of their daughter Suzanne, with the Municipality of Tel Aviv-Yaffo, the Tel Aviv Foundation, and the Israeli Ministry of Culture and Education. Located in Tel Aviv's historic Neve Tzedek neighborhood, the Centre's campus includes four performance halls, rehearsal studios, and plazas that host outdoor performances and events throughout the year. It is home to The Batsheva Dance Company, Inbal Pinto and Avshallom Pollack Dance Company, Inbal Theater, and the Orna Porat Children and Youth Theatre. The Suzanne Dellal Centre is the most visited tourist sight in Tel Aviv.


The Israel Museum, Jerusalem


The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art and includes the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy Land archaeology in the world, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. Over its first 50 years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. In 2010, the Museum completed a comprehensive renewal of its campus led by James Carpenter Design Associates, New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects, Tel Aviv, including the creation of new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, and the complete reinstallation of its encyclopedic collections. The Museum also organizes and presents programming at its off-site locations in Jerusalem at the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum, where it presents archaeological artifacts from the Land of Israel; and at its historic Ticho House in downtown Jerusalem, a venue for exhibitions of contemporary Israeli art. The Museum is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2015, with a year-long program devoted to an exploration of Israel's aesthetic culture in the 50 years before and after its founding.

 

 

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Out of the Circle:                  The Art of Dance in Israel                     Schedule of Performances


Choreographer                                      Performance                                                      Date


Roy Assaf                                                  GIRLS                                                 December 23, 2014

Yossi Berg & Oded Graf       4Men, Alice, Bach and The Deer                   December 30, 2014

Shlomit Fundaminsky                 Mantra and La Divina                                January 6, 2015

Niv Sheinfeld & Oren Laor        Two Room Apartment                               January 13, 2015

Avi Kaiser & Sergio Antonino             At Your Place                                   January 20, 2015

Idan Sharabi                                             Makom                                          January 27, 2015

Noa Zuk                                          Doom Doom Land                                 February 3, 2015

Hillel Kogan                                       We Love Arabs                                  February 3, 2015

Yasmeen Godder                             Lie Like a Lion                                   February 10, 2015

Dafi Altabeb                                     Sensitivity to Heat                              February 17, 2015

Renana Raz                 We Have Been Called to Go Pictures at an Exhibition*  February 24, 2015

*A special evening by Renana Raz, including highlights of past works to be performed throughout the Museum, featuring Ilayah Shalit, Ron Ben Dror, Ofer Amram, and Renana Raz

 

All performances will take place at 9 pm at the exhibition gallery.


Tickets may be purchased at www.imj.org.il or in person at the Museum.


Performance fee: 65 NIS; 50 NIS for members, students and soldiers.


Tickets include entrance to the museum after 8 pm

 

Photos Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Institute for Sefardi and Anousim Studies Together with "Ayala Geographit"


Invite you to a special cultural event in Hebrew 


Portugal-A Meeting with descendants of the Anousim


Thursday December the 18, 2014 at 18:00 


The evening will be dedicated in memory of Mr. Aharon Zar who headed the Jewish Community of Madrid and contributed to the connection of the Anousim in Portugal with Israel


At Netanya Academic College, 1 Hauniversita Street, in Tshuva Hall 


Free Entrance. Confirmation at Esti Feinreich: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 


The event will be conducted by:


Tami Fortis, expert guide for excursions in Portugal

 
Salomon Buzaglo , Institute for Sefardi and Anousim Studies Manager


Program:


• 18:00-18:30 Reception at the entrance to the hall: Third Night of Chanukah lighting, refreshments.


• Yeoshua Gura (Former vice Mayor of Herzelia): Words in memory of Aharon Zar 


• Professor Abraham Gross: Anousim in Spain and Portugal


• Guest of Honor: Carolino Tapadejo former Mayor of Castelo de Vide, Portugal: The descendants of "Conversos" in Portugal in the last few Generations.


• Question and Answer session moderated by Salomon Buzaglo with consecutive translation to Hebrew.


• Artistic program: "ZEMER LAKH" The choir of the city of Herzelia:


Ladino songs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before becoming one of the country's most prominent and acclaimed cultural disciplines, Israeli dance had to forge a new path in search of its identity. This exhibition – coinciding with the 25th anniversary of the Suzanne Dellal Centre for Dance and Theatre – presents a number of milestones and key figures from the history of Israeli modern dance, alongside contemporary work by some of the many choreographers active today. Works of dance and art from different periods are displayed together, and in all of them, one motif – whether explicit or implied – comes to the fore: the circle.

 

This perfect geometric form is simultaneously open and closed – empty on the inside and bounded on the outside. Choreographically, it may signify social order or disruption. As a place, it is defined by a repetitive movement that may open up into different forms but ends up at the same point. With no beginning and no end, no head and no tail, the circle suggests equality and cohesiveness, all the members of the company joined in fellowship.

 

Emerging from the Zionist pioneer horas of the early 20th century, this dance motif is charged with both structural and socio-historical meaning. Echoing changes that took place in the country, the circle that came together and later was broken sheds light on the tension between order and chaos, between the part and the whole, between local and universal mythologies. As the private individual came to take precedence over collective identity, dance moved in new directions. Instead of an agricultural socialist ethos came an urban setting, personal subject matter, and a focus on distinctive expression and creativity. Pathos and sweeping narratives gave way to the inner voice and the mundane gesture, to minimalism, movement notation, and an investigation of the human body.

 

Israel has moved from open fields to crowded apartments, visionary enthusiasm to painful self-awareness, light-hearted festivals to dark memorial days – and in the process, the dancing ring has come apart. Artists are seeking other forms and languages of movement. Some have confronted the circle with irony or social critiques. Some reinterpret it, applying it to different types of communities, seeing it as a symbol for living in harmony with (instead of conquering) nature. And some have infused it with new, bittersweet fantasies.

 

These dance artists look outward to the world and inward to eternal human concerns. Against the background of various Western traditions – such as expressionism, the modern American dance of Martha Graham, and Pina Bausch's dance theatre – and the search for ethnic roots, dance in Israel, in all its many forms, is no longer attempting to make and define "Israeli Dance" – an elusive term in any case. Today it is global, challenging boundaries, whether national borders or the confines of the stage, and inhabiting realms both real and metaphorical, both in and out of the circle.

 

Photo Eyal Lansmann

 

 

 

Ensemble PHOENIX on early instruments

Myrna Herzog. conductor

Tarantella : Neapolitan Music for Chrismas 

 

Sharon Rostorf-Zamir, Michal Okon, Yael Izkovich, Yaacov Halperin, Guy Pelc

 

 

Program of Christmas music from Baroque Naples, an extravagant celebration, a fusion of sacred and profane. PHOENIX performs the Israeli premieres of Cristofaro Caresana's Nativity theatrical cantatas, colorful works by Andrea Falconieri and Neapolitan Christmas folk songs.

 

Sat. 13 December at 11:00 am


The Catholic Church of Mar Elias, 23 Ein Dor st., Wadi Nisnas,Haifa.


Reservations: 04 836-3804

 

Tue. 16 December at 20:30


St. Andrew's (Scottish) Church, 1 David Remez st., Jerusalem


Reservations : This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

additional information:

http://www.phoenixearlymusic.com/index.php/programs/49-our-programs/81-tarantella-neapolitan-music-for-christmas

 

www.phoenixearlymusic.com

 

 

 

 

It's been a year, and we're delighted to invite you once again to take a captivating journey to the worlds of Polish food and Jewish-Polish food. The Second Polish Culinary Week offers dozens of cultural and culinary events, to be held in downtown Haifa and several locations across Israel. 'Bread and Memory' events, orchestrated by Chef-Baker Erez Komarovsky, with the participation of Israel's finest bakers; fabulous dough prepared by a Polish-Tatar-Muslim woman chef; herring and vodka parties; guest chefs from Poland; and popup restaurants dedicated to gefilte fish - are just some of the surprises awaiting you.

 

28-06  all week Bread and Memories
20 participating bakeries around the country
Pastry-chef Michal Bouton at the Wine Bar
Wine Bar, Tel Aviv

28 November Friday
Friday Polish Taverns
Around the country
Herring Embassy at the Broken Fingaz Crew
The Kartel, Haifa

29 November Saturday
Gefilterama - the opening
Pasáž, Tel Aviv

30 November Sunday
Meir Adoni cooks à la Polonaise
Lumina Tel Aviv
Polish-Tatar baking in Haifa's Turkish Market
Joz ve Loz, Tel Aviv
Gefilterama
Pasáž, Tel Aviv

01 December Monday
Herring Dinner with Marta and & Filip Danielak
Minzar, Tel Aviv
Meir Adoni cooks à la Polonaise
Lumina Tel Aviv
Tastes from Poland's Forests - A Honey Meal at Halutzim 3
Halutzim 3, Tel Aviv
Polish-Tatar baking
The traditional Polish Christmas dinner
Colony Hotel, Haifa
Gefilterama
Pasáž, Tel Aviv


02 December Tuesday
Israeli Nalevki
Sinkopa Bar, Haifa
Herring Dinner with Marta and & Filip Danielak
Minzar, Tel Aviv
Meir Adoni cooks à la Polonaise
Lumina Tel Aviv
Cookery workshop - treats from a Jewish-Polish drinking session
Bulthaup Culinary Academy, Tel Aviv
An intoxicating literary klezmer evening
Ha'Agaf Gallery, Haifa
Gefilterama
Pasáž, Tel Aviv


03 December Wednesday
Meir Adoni cooks à la Polonaise
Lumina Tel Aviv
The Venya Bistro hosts Chef Alexander Baron
Vienna Bistro, Haifa
The central event - OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Haifa hangar, 32-33 Hanamal Street
Gefilterama
Pasáž, Tel Aviv


04 December Thursday
The Jerusalem Shtetl - authentic cuisine or the Food of immigrants?
Yad Ben-Zvi, Jerusalem
Meir Adoni cooks à la Polonaise
Lumina Tel Aviv
The Venya Bistro hosts Chef Alexander Baron
Vienna Bistro, Haifa
Gefilterama
Pasáž, Tel Aviv

05 December Friday
Poland in Jerusalem
Yad Ben-Zvi, Jerusalem
Chef Agata Wojda @ Ha'namal 24
Ha'namal 24, Haifa

06 December Saturday
Chef Agata Wojda @ Ha'namal 24
Ha'namal 24, Haifa
Alexander Baron BBQ at Haogen Pub
Ogen pub, Haifa

ABOUT
At the end of the first Polish Food Week, we were left with the taste for more... with the desire to track down other unfamiliar stories, the passion to continue disclosing the surprising aspects of Polish and Polish-Jewish cuisine. We were delighted by the participants in the 2013 Polish Culinary Week events, and they made us realize, more than ever, that yearning for memories and roots is integral to generating a new culture. Over the past year we embarked on a culinary-cultural journey to discover new stories, and we're excited to share our findings with you.

The festival's inaugural year opened with Modest Amaro, the first Polish chef to win a Michelin star, and with Poland's new haute cuisine. This year we decided to seek out the other end, and the small community of Polish-Muslim-Tatars living in a remote rural region. Members of that community, the Bogdanowicz family, will be guests of the Polish Culinary Week and will present their magnificent pastry-making. When one hears 'Polish cuisine,' not many think about savoury and sweet baked goods which were born among nomadic tribes in Central Asia. And yet the heritage foods of the same community are now an inseparable part of the Polish kitchen (and there's also a riveting Jewish connection that will be revealed to the festival's visitors).

Dough, bread, and the baking process are the focus of festival events this year. Chef Erez Komarovsky, leading bakers and pastry-chefs, and the Bezalel Design Academy have joined us in a beautiful project which explores the ties between bread and memory - and in the process, revives some close-to-forgotten recipes. A peak event of the 2014 Polish Food Week will take place in downtown Haifa, where we'll be holding an installation on bread - it's open to the public, and crammed with surprises for all the senses... but we're just as thrilled by smaller peaks. Throughout the week, for example, bialy - the little yeast rolls filled with onions and poppy-seeds which originated in Bialystok, Podlesie province - will be baked and sold at close to a dozen bakeries across Israel. Along with the beigel, New Yorkers have made this pastry a symbol of Polish-Jewish cuisine, but in Israel it is almost non-existent: we hope it will meet with a warm and loving welcome here.

These are just a few examples, of course. There's also a one-off temple to gefilte fish that will be open for five days - a collaboration with artist Roni Levit; a series of guest chefs from Poland who will be hosted in downtown Haifa restaurants; and an assortment of celebrations, workshops, culinary tours, and cultural events. We're sure that this is the beginning of a great tradition, and let us wish you a wonderful week of new discoveries and thrilling adventures.

 

TEAM
The Ambassador of Poland in Israel: H.E. Jacek Chodorowicz
The Director of the Polish Institute: Krzysztof Kopytko

Content and production manager:Arieh Rosen
Content management, culinary
consulting, and text writing:Ronit Vered
Production:Yael Cohen
Production Assistant: Lee Shati
Public Relations: Hadas Shapira
Advertising:Allenby
Website:Goufo
Festival Image:Roni LevitEnglish Translation:Diana RubanenkoPolish Institute Team: Deputy Director: Karol Prejna
Office Manager: Agata Peleszuk
Cultural Department: Anna Kardaszewska, Yifat Zvirin, Arieh Rosen
Education Department: Tadeusz Woleński
Logistics: Jacek Sawicki
Library:Julia Saban

Phone: 03.6962053 Mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 Michael Flatley's Lord Of The Dance: Dangerous Games – a spectacular new staging of the traditional masterpiece – 4-13 December 2014 in Israel.

 

With all the visceral precision and thrills of the original, Lord Of The Dance: Dangerous Games features new staging, new costumes and choreography and 40 of the world's most outstanding young performers directed by Michael Flatley. With new music by composer Gerard Fahy, this latest iteration combines the best of tradition with all the excitement of new music and dance.

 

"I'm blown away by the remarkable talent and abilities of the great cast we've gathered." says Flatley, adding "I've always wanted to dance at home in Ireland one more time and I couldn't resist joining these future stars on stage for a couple of big numbers, we're all very excited to take our show home."

 

 

Dates, theaters and ticket prices:

Thursday 4-12-14 Jerusalem PAIS ARENA 20.30 hs

Friday 5-12-14 Beer Sheva Ulam HaKunjia 16.30 & 21 hs

Saturday 6-12-14 Tel Aviv Nokia 16.30 & 20.45 hs

Sunday 7-12-14 Tel Aviv Nokia 20.30 hs

Monday 8-12-14 Tel Aviv Nokia 20.30 hs

Tuesday 9-12-14 Tel Aviv Nokia 20.30 hs

Wednesday 10-12-14 Tel Aviv Nokia 20.30 hs

Friday 12-12-14 Haifa Hichal Ha Sport Romema 21.30 hs

Saturday 13-12 14 Haifa Hichal Ha Sport Romema 20.30 hs

 

Tickets Phone * 9645

 

Tickets prices:

In Tel Aviv Haifa Jerusalem

449 ₪ 149 ₪

In Beer Sheva

349 ₪ - 149 ₪

 

 

 

 

Production in Israel : Galim Production

 

 

Site www.lordofthedance.co.il

 

 

 

 

 

 Photos  PROVIDED BY THE  Lord Of The Dance  PRODUCTION  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From Herod's palace to British prison: The Tower of David Museum invites the general public to come, enjoy and explore the moat and the Kishle building which will be open for the first time to the general public since it has been renovated.

 

"Kishle" is the term used by the Turkish Ottomans to refer to soldiers' barracks. The Kishle prison in Jerusalem's Old City, adjacent to David's Citadel, was built by the Ottoman Turks in the mid-1800s. It later served the British as a jail for members of the pre-state underground, and evidence of the period can be seen in a scratched inscription on its walls.

 

This large arched structure contains remains from nearly every period in Jerusalem's history, from King Herod to the Crusaders and the British Mandate. Excavations have revealed important findings from the First and Second Temple periods, including parts of the Hasmonean city wall (2nd century BCE) a wall from the time of King Hezekiah (8th century BCE), two massive walls of Herod's palace and a drainage system running from the palace to outside the city walls. Other findings include pools that archeologists believe may have been used to dye cloth during the Middle East. The leading archeologist on the Kishle excavations is Amit Reem (today Chief Archeologist of Jerusalem for the Israel Antiquities Authority).

 

Previously, the Kishle had only been open for a few small groups as access to the impressive excavations was unsafe. Now the Tower of David Museum has renovated the access and the excavations dating back to before King Herod are beautifully lit up for all to see.

 

After many years during which the Citadel moat was closed to the public, the southern part of Jerusalem's historic moat has been revived. The ancient builders of the Citadel surrounded the fortress with a dry moat, the first line of defense against enemies. As years passed, the moat served other purposes. It was a marketplace, a passageway and even a makeshift garbage dump. Excavations in the moat have exposed archeological remains including an ancient quarry, a ritual bath from the Second Temple, a hewn water channel, secret passageways and a giant stone staircase and pools from the Hasmonean and Herodian eras. The renewed moat also includes passage to a building that was closed for many years.

 

Photo : Access to Kishle excavations following renovations

Copyright: Oded Antman

 

 

The Shakespeare International Theatre Festival will take place between 28.10 – 15.11.2014 at the Cameri Theatre in Tel Aviv. With the support of the Romanian Cultural Institute in Tel Aviv, Romania is represented by the "Marin Sorescu" National Theatre in Craiova with the performance "A Tempest" by William Shakespeare, directed and adapted by Silviu Purcarete, a well-known and internationally acclaimed director.

 

 


On this occasion, the President of the Romanian Cultural Institute, Lilian Zamfiroiu, who is currently visiting Israel, shared with us some of the major guidelines regarding the mission of the Romanian Cultural Institute abroad.



Dr. Lilian Zamfiroiu was appointed as the President of the RCI in July 2013. Until then, he served as the deputy of the Romanian ambassador to UNESCO, Paris, with the diplomatic rank of minister plenipotentiary, and held various positions within the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.


The Romanian Cultural Institute, a public body founded in 2003, is tasked with raising the profile of Romanian culture around the world. The Institute acts as means through which foreign audiences can experience the products of Romanian culture. Cultural exports from Romania are, for the most part, facilitated by the institute's 16 foreign branches, located in Berlin, Brussels, Budapest (with a subsidiary in Szeged), Istanbul, Lisbon, London, Madrid, New York, Paris, Prague, Rome, Stockholm, Tel Aviv, Venice, Vienna, Warsaw and, soon, in Beijing. These branches are tasked with organizing high-visibility cultural events adapted to suit the tastes of foreign audiences, while at the same time ensuring that a balance be maintained between their uniqueness and an international appeal.

 

For the Romanian Cultural Institute being able to fulfill its role as a global player in increasing the visibility, prestige and knowledge of national culture and civilization, is indispensable, while, in the same time, working towards launching new programs and improving on the beneficial development initiatives from the past. Right from the outset, we realize the need for a comprehensive understanding of culture and its synchronization with today's world. We consider culture a complex whole which encompasses knowledge, convictions, arts, morality, laws, customs and techniques acquired by a community, all these molding its life and aspirations. Therefore, we naturally include in the culture fields supported by the institute in Romania and abroad literature, music, visual arts, sciences – starting with economy and law and, of course, experimental sciences – architecture, philosophy and theological reflection. By doing so, we ensure the comprehensive integration of culture by the Romanian Cultural Institute on a contemporary level.


A healthy pluralism of visions, approaches and media of expression ensures culture a most auspicious environment. The Romanian Cultural Institute encourages innovating initiatives and original creations.

 


Recently, The Romanian Cultural Institute has coordinated the 6th edition of the EU-China Cultural Dialogue that took place in Bucharest, on October 15 – 17.


The general aim of the EU-Chinese Cultural Dialogues was to expand the existing cultural relations and the bilateral exchange activities to a long-term cultural dialogue on important topics of cultural cooperation between Europe and China.


Dr. Lilian Zamfiroiu would like to point out that selecting Romania as the host for this event represents both a proof of trust and also a recognition of the high quality and professionalism of the cultural programs that the Romanian Cultural Institute is supporting worldwide.



The Tel Aviv branch of the Romanian Cultural Institute has been active in Israel since 2004. In its 10 years of existence, RCI Tel Aviv has earned its distinct place in the Israeli cultural scene, through the supported efforts of an extremely dedicated team who continuously works towards promoting and increasing the level of visibility of the Romanian cultural values. The majority of the more than 900 events organized so far has been represented by either international conferences, concerts, exhibitions, translation workshops, the production of Romanian plays in Hebrew on the Israeli stage, and has been accomplished in collaboration with prestigious Israeli institutions and with the participation of numerous Israeli artists, authors, scholars and creators, in common projects of high impact.


A small selection of the various activities organized by RCI Tel Aviv to celebrate 10 years of activity in Israel is: in the academic field, the symposium Jewish-Romanian Architects in Bucharest of the Interwar Period, in collaboration with the Technion Institute in Haifa, the international colloquium Tombstones Tell Stories: Sepulchral Art in Romania, at the Bar Ilan University, or the conference The Theater of the Absurd, as a Moral Response to the Nazi Ideology. The cases of Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco, followed by a master class on the theatre of the absurd during the communist and post-communist period, both delivered by prof. Octavian Saiu. Also this year, lyrical artists from Romania (baritone Ionuț Pascu, tenor Cristian Mogoșan and sopranos Aurelia Forian & Elena Moșuc) have performed leading roles on the stage of the Israeli National Opera, in productions such as "Un ballo in maschera", "Les contes d'Hoffman", "La Boheme" and "La Traviata", during the Opera Festival in Masada. Cinema, theatre and Romanian music have also been successfully represented during this year. Recently, the Akko Festival of Alternative Theatre has produced, in Hebrew, the play "Stop the tempo" by the Romanian playwright Gianina Carbunariu, while, in the same time, the Flauto Dolce Ensemble has performed concerts and delivered master classes at the Israeli Conservatory in Tel Aviv.

 

 


These are just a few of the celebratory projects organized in 2014 by RCI Tel Aviv. As it was proven during these 10 years, we strongly believe that the Romanian Cultural Institute will continue to support and develop the powerful bonds that have been established so far, to the delight of the Israeli audience, who is already acquainted with the richness and quality of the Romanian cultural productions.

 

 

 Photos provided by the Romanian Cultural Institute 

 

 

 

 According to Dr. Rina Avner, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "This is an extraordinary find of enormous historical importance"

All of the information regarding the inscription will be presented in a conference open to the public on "Innovations in the Archaeology of Jerusalem and its Surroundings", to be held this Thursday (23/10) on the Mount Scopus campus of the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

A rare find of tremendous historical significance was discovered in Jerusalem: a fragment of a stone engraved with an official Latin inscription dedicated to the Roman emperor Hadrian. Researchers believe this is among the most important Latin inscriptions ever discovered in Jerusalem.

During the past year the Israel Antiquities Authority conducted salvage excavations in several areas north of Damascus Gate. In one of those areas a stone fragment bearing an official Latin inscription from the Roman period was discovered. According to Dr. Rina Avner and Roie Greenwald, excavation directors on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "We found the inscription incorporated in secondary use around the opening of a deep cistern. In antiquity, as today, it was customary to recycle building materials and the official inscription was evidently removed from its original location and integrated in a floor for the practical purpose of building the cistern. Furthermore, in order to fit it with the capstone, the bottom part of the inscription was sawed round."

Upon finding the inscription it was immediately clear to the excavators that they had uncovered an especially significant discovery, as indicated by the size and clarity of the letters.

The inscriptions, consisting of six lines of Latin text engraved on hard limestone, was read and translated by Avner Ecker and Hannah Cotton of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The English translation of the inscription is as follows: (1st hand)To the Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadrianus Augustus, son of the deified Traianus Parthicus, grandson of the deified Nerva, high priest, invested with tribunician power for the 14th time, consul for the third time, father of the country (dedicated by) the 10th legion Fretensis (2nd hand) Antoniniana.

According to Ecker and Cotton, "This inscription was dedicated by Legio X Fretensis to the emperor Hadrian in the year 129/130 CE." Their analysis shows that the fragment of the inscription revealed by the IAA archaeologists is none other than the right half of a complete inscription, the other part of which was discovered nearby in the late nineteenth

century and was published by the pre-eminent French archaeologist Charles Clermont-Ganneau. That stone is currently on display in the courtyard of Studium Biblicum Franciscanum Museum.

Only a small number of ancient official Latin inscriptions have been discovered in archaeological excavations throughout the country and in Jerusalem in particular, and there is no doubt that this is one of the most important of them. The significance of the inscription stems from the fact that it specifically mentions the name and titles of Hadrian who was an extremely prominent emperor, as well as a clear date. The latter is a significant and tangible confirmation of the historical account regarding the presence of the Tenth Legion in Jerusalem during the period between the two revolts, and possibly even the location of the legion's military camp in the city, and of one of the reasons for the outbreak of the Bar Kokhba revolt several years later and the establishment of 'Aelia Capitolina'. Even after 2,000 years the inscription is in an impressive state of preservation. Once the excavation findings are published the inscription will be conserved and put on display for the public.

The events of the Bar Kokhba revolt are ascribed to the reign of the emperor Hadrian. He is remembered in Jewish history for having issued dictates imposing the persecution and forced conversions of Jews, which the sources referred to as the 'Hadrianic decrees'.

The history of the Bar Kokhba revolt is known from, among other things, the works of the contemporary Roman historian Cassius Dio, who also mentions Hadrian's visit to Jerusalem in the year 129/130 CE, within the framework of the emperor's travels in the eastern empire. These travels are also documented on coins issued in honor of the occasion and in inscriptions specifically engraved prior to his arrival in different cities. This is apparently exactly what happened in Jerusalem.

The completion of the two parts of the text reveals an especially large inscription that is quite impressive. According to Dr. Abner, "The inscription itself might have set in the top of a free-standing triumphal arch on the city's northern boundary such the Arch of Titus in Rome."

The fate of Jerusalem following the destruction of the Second Temple (70 CE) and prior to the Bar Kokhba revolt (132-136 AD) is one of the major issues in the history of the city and in terms of the Jewish people's connection to it.

We know from ancient writers and the inscriptions on coins that the new city, which Hadrian established, was granted the status of 'colonia' (that is, a city whose citizens and gods are Roman) and its name was changed to Aelia Capitolina (COLONIA AELIA CAPITOLINA in Latin). That name incorporates within it the emperor's name that is in the inscription, whose full name is Publius Aelius Hadrianus, and Rome's main family of dieties.

There is no doubt that the discovery of this inscription will contribute greatly to the long-standing question about the reasons that led to the outbreak of the Bar Kokhba revolt: were the reasons for the rebellion the construction of Aelia Capitolina and the establishment of the pagan temple on the site of the Jewish Temple Mount or conversely perhaps, these were the results of the revolt – that is, punitive action taken by Hadrian against those who rebelled against Roman rule?

All of the information regarding the inscription will be presented in a conference on "Innovations in the Archaeology of Jerusalem and its Surroundings" to be held this Thursday (23/10) on the Mount Scopus campus of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The conference will be open to the public. For details see the Israel Antiquities Authority website – www.antiquities.org.il

 

1. Photograph of the inscription against the background of the Rockefeller Museum, seat of the Israel Antiquities Authority. Photographic credit: Yoli Shwartz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

2.The inscription. Photographic credit: Yoli Shwartz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

3. Preservation of the unique find. Photographic credit: Yoli Shwartz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

4. The second half of the inscription that was uncovered more than 100 years ago, situated in the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum Museum. Photographic credit Garo Nalbandian, Courtesy of the Studium Biblicum Franciscanum Museum.

 

 

 

 

  

 A major event of the 5th Tel Aviv International Early Music Seminar (director: Drora Bruck) on October 13th 2014 at the Lin and Ted Arison Israel Conservatory of Music was a concert performed by four members of Ensemble Flauto Dolce, Romania – artistic director Zoltán Majó (recorders), Mária Szabó (recorders), Erich Türk (harpsichord) and Mihaela Maxim (soprano). Ensemble Flauto Dolce was established by Zoltán Majó within the framework of the Gheorghe Dima Music Academy in Cluj in 2000, with the aim of familiarizing the recorder and its repertoire to Romanian audiences.

 

The ensemble presents from Renaissance to contemporary works of traditional- and art music in different recorder settings, in particular, performing early music from Romania found in old Romanian- and other European manuscripts. As the guest ensemble of the 5th Tel Aviv International Early Music Seminar, Flauto Dolce's wish was to bring this Romanian repertoire to the attention of seminar participants and audiences, both in concerts and master classes.

 

The Romanian Cultural Institute, Tel Aviv, supported Flauto Dolce's participation in the seminar. This writer also attended sessions of the International Conference on the Study of Performance, Past and Present (conference chairs: Dr. Uri Golomb, Dr. Alon Schab), in which presentations by Erich Türk (Interpretation inspired by period instruments: Transylvania's Baroque organ positives) and Mária Szabó (Early music from Romania...musical performance in Romania in the 17th to 19th centuries, based on original manuscripts) shed light on the very many different geographical and ethnic traditions and styles feeding into the wide repertoire of Romanian music and culture.

 

The concert program included interesting pieces from three regions of Romania today – Transylvania, Moldavia and Wallachia. What has characterized and continues to do so in these regions is the coexistence of several cultures and nationalities (Romanians, Hungarians, Germans, Hassidic Jews, Armenians, etc) and religious groups (Eastern Orthodox, Catholic, Reformed Church, Muslim and Jewish). Researcher of early Romanian music manuscripts Mária Szabó writes: "This colorful mixture of different styles and influences is reflected in the musical materials that can be found in the original manuscripts...preserved in various archives throughout Romania, which represent a valuable contribution to the history of East-European music".

The concert opened with three pieces from Codex Caioni (Transylvania, 17th century), the first a harpsichord piece, then two sacred vocal works. Johannes Caioni was a Franciscan monk, musician, folklorist, humanist and organ builder, whose collection includes works of composers, folk songs, courtly dances, church music and works performed by high society and lower.

 

We heard some works of German composers in Romania, firstly two songs by organist Gabriel Reilich (1643-1677) from Hermannstadt (today Sibiu, Romania); then "Ach, süsses Wort" (Oh, sweet word) by Johann Sartorius (1712-1787). Also from Hermannstadt, Sartorius, an organist in a Lutheran church, composed cantatas, writing in a style between Baroque and Classical. Türk's tasteful performance of the galant-style harpsichord Arioso & Sonata by Martin Schneider (1748-1812) from the Choral Book 1779 from Braşov (formerly Kronstadt) was a finely played example of house music, of keyboard fare accessible to the listener but demanding of good technique and stylistic accuracy.

Worlds away, yet from the same vicinity, we heard some anonymous traditional Armenian songs from Gherla (formerly Armenopolis) a cathedral city close to Cluj, founded by Armenians. Here, Ensemble Flauto Dolce transported the audience to the world of oriental music and culture and mystery, with arrangements now not anchored in western harmony, but with melodies of octave doubling and with the use of percussion instruments. In one song, soprano Mihaela Maxim, in warm, honeyed sounds, was joined in song Majó in an appealing song arrangement, whereas, in another, she adopted a folk-like manner of chest voice singing – earthy, rustic and real. Altogether, the folk material, however artistically set, never lost its authentic feel; it was embellished by some charming effects - finger-snapping, a vase used as a percussion instrument and typical bourdon accompaniments, the augmented second often present in its folk scales.

 

The song repertoire of the Hassidic Jewish community from the Maramuresh region was beautifully represented, sung in Yiddish and presented with the characteristic mix of joy, humor and underlying melancholy. In the first song, a rain drum, producing an inebriating rain effect, accompanied a prayer for rain. Mihaela Maxim captured the Hassidic inflection as she convinced and entertained, with the instrumentalists evoking something of the carefree playing of Hassidic wedding musicians.

And then there was an item to make all recorder players sit up and rub their eyes – a G.Ph.Telemann recorder sonata for two alto instruments, discovered in a 1757 manuscript at Sfântu Gheorghe (formerly Sepsiszenthgyörgy), probably originating at the Dresden court. Had we not played all the Telemann sonatas, familiar with every note of them? Apparently not! Performed sympathetically and with much dialogue by Majó and Szabó, the three-movement B flat major sonata made its Israeli debut, the lower voice (Szabó) mostly supplying harmonic support to the upper, more melodic voice.

 

The concert ended with two anonymous Romanian songs and some old Romanian dances from Moldavia and Wallachia. Maxim's theatrical flair and facial expressions lent much humor to the songs as the instrumentalists added their contribution to the fun, ending the program with all care thrown to the winds in a wildly hopping Romanian dance.

 

This was an evening bristling with interest, of variety and very fine and carefully stylized playing. Arrangements were tasteful, the use of tenor and bass recorders providing an active, mellow but non-obtrusive setting for many of the songs. Mihaela Maxim took on each style and mood with informed versatility, her fine, richly colored voice communicative and pleasing. Erich Türk's explanations throughout the evening added much to the audience's understanding of the breadth and abundance of Romanian music.

 

Pamela Hickman

Born in Australia;in Israel since 1968.Studied at Melbourne University(BA Languages,Music,Education),the Jerusalem Academy of Music(Theory,Composition),New York University(Music education.)

 

  http://pamelahickmansblog.blogspot.co.il/

 

 Photo  Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 So Corporals Walsh and Scarlett, Who Are You?

An Ancient Ritual Bath and Graffiti left by Australian Soldiers during the Second World War were Exposed at Ha-Ela Junction

 

The discoveries were revealed in archaeological excavations carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority prior to widening Highway 38, at the
initiative of the Netivei Israel Company

A 1,900 year old ritual bath (miqwe) was recently exposed at Ha-Ela Junction in excavations undertaken by the Israel Antiquities Authority and financed by the Netivei Israel Company, prior to widening Highway 38. An enormous 1,700 years old water cistern was revealed nearby in which graffiti was discovered that had been engraved on the reservoir's ceiling by Australian soldiers during the Second World War.

According to Yoav Tsur, excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "We exposed a miqwe in which there are five steps; the fifth step being a bench where one could sit at the edge of the immersion pool. We found fragments of magnificent pottery vessels there dating to the second century CE, among them lamps, red burnished vessels, a jug and cooking pots. Apparently the miqwe ceased to be used during the second century CE, perhaps in light of the Bar Kokhba revolt. A rock-hewn opening was exposed south of the miqwe, which appears to have been the entrance to a large water cistern. It seems that in an early phase it was a smaller reservoir and functioned as the "otzar" (water collecting vat) for the miqwe. When the miqwe ceased to be used the cistern's original cavity was increased to its current large dimensions and an extensive surface was built nearby which facilitated drawing water.

During the course of the excavation the archaeologists were surprised to discover some contemporary yet intriguing finds: graffiti engraved on the ceiling of the cistern indicating the place had been exposed until the 1940's. The inscriptions were read by Assaf Peretz, an archaeologist and historian with the Israel Antiquities Authority, who said, "Among other things, two English names were identified that are carved in the rock: Cpl Scarlett and Walsh. Next to the names are carved the initials RAE and two numbers – NX7792 and NX9168. The date 30/05/1940 appears below the graffiti. Since the initials Cpl signify the rank of corporal, we can assume that these were soldiers who wanted to leave their mark there. An inquiry with the proper authorities revealed that the numbers engraved inside the cistern are actually soldiers' serial numbers and that RAE stands for Royal Australian Engineers. A search in the Australian government archives revealed the following information: Corporal Philip William Scarlett was born in Melbourne in 1918, was drafted into the army in 1939, survived the war and died in 1970, shortly before his fifty-second birthday. His comrade, Patrick Raphael Walsh, was born in 1910 in Cowra, was drafted in 1939, survived the war and passed away in 2005 at the age of 95. It seems that the two were members of the Australian Sixth Division which was stationed in the country at the time of the British Mandate and was undergoing training prior to being sent into combat in France. Because France surrendered before the troops were ready they were ultimately sent to Egypt in October 1940 where they fought at the front in the Western Desert". The archaeologists added, "If the relatives of these people are acquainted with the story, we'll be happy if they contact us and we'll share with them the warm greetings left behind by Scarlett and Walsh".

Peretz adds, "The fins of British mortar bombs were found while searching the site, as were twenty-seven rifle cartridges, six of which were manufactured in Australia and fired in the region".

According to Tsur, "The finds from this excavation allow us to reconstruct a double story: about the Jewish settlement in the second century CE, probably against the background of the events of the Bar Kokhba revolt, and another story, no less fascinating, about a group of Australian soldiers who visited the site c. 1,700 years later and left their mark there".

Pablo Betzer, the district archaeologist for Judah of the Israel Antiquities Authority, points out that in the wake of the discovery the Israel Antiquities Authority requested that Netivei Israel Company modify the junction's construction plan in order to preserve the finds there and rehabilitate them as part of the landscape alongside the road. The Netivei Israel Company has agreed to so.


Photo : The engraved graffiti left by the Australian soldiers. Photographic credit: Assaf Peretz, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

 

 

 

  

Exhibition Features Largest Gold Medallion with Jewish Motifs Ever To Be Found

 

Jerusalem, Israel, September 21, 2014 -- A rare cache of Byzantine-era antiquities discovered in 2013, including the largest gold medallion with Judaic symbols known in existence, are on public display for the first time in a focused exhibition at The Israel Museum, Jerusalem. Among the archaeological finds on view—all of which were packaged in two cloth bags—are gold coins and silver and gold jewelry, in addition to the sizable medallion, measuring four inches in diameter. The treasures were found in a Byzantine period public building near the southern wall of the Temple Mount during excavations led by Dr. Eilat Mazar, of Hebrew University's Institute of Archaeology, together with a team from Oklahoma's Ambassador College.

The unique medallion has, in its center, a menorah (seven-branched candelabrum). On the left is a shofar -- the ram's horn traditionally blown on the Jewish New Year and Day of Atonement, and on its right, an unidentified object – possibly a bundle of myrtle, willow and palm branches, being three of the four species used during the Sukkot holiday and common Jewish symbols of the period, or perhaps a uniquely fashioned Torah scroll of unknown design from this period.

"We are pleased to be displaying this rare Byzantine treasure to the public for the first time," said James S. Snyder, Anne and Jerome Fisher Director of the Israel Museum. "Although much remains unknown about the use and significance of these artifacts, they are undoubtedly among archaeology's most exciting recent finds. They are now on display in the Holy Land Gallery of our Archaeology Wing, which is devoted to the concurrent development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam during Byzantine times, strengthening the Museum's narrative of the early chapters in the evolution of the world's three main monotheistic faiths."

The unusually large size of the medallion raises important questions about its use. Some scholars believe it was used to decorate a Torah or piece of furniture, while others argue that it was simply a large ceremonial ornament. Like many finds from this period, the medallion's combination of symbols reflects the timeless notion of ​​ Jewish yearning for the restoration of the Temple, destroyed by the Romans in 70 CE.

One of the two cloth pouches in which the hoard was found held thirty-six gold coins, decorated on one side with portraits of Byzantine-era emperors over a period of 250 years, together with their names and titles; on the back there are crosses or images of gods. The latest coin is dated 602 CE, indicating that the cache was hidden at the beginning of the 7th century, possibly during the Persian invasion of 614 CE.

The special exhibition of the hoard is made possible by Meredith Berkman and Daniel Mintz, New York, who also supported the hoard's excavation, and curated by David Mevorach, Senior Curator of Hellenistic, Roman, and Byzantine Archeology.

The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
The Israel Museum is the largest cultural institution in the State of Israel and is ranked among the leading art and archaeology museums in the world. Founded in 1965, the Museum houses encyclopedic collections ranging from prehistory through contemporary art and includes the most extensive holdings of Biblical and Holy-Land archaeology in the world, among them the Dead Sea Scrolls. In just under 50 years, the Museum has built a far-ranging collection of nearly 500,000 objects through an unparalleled legacy of gifts and support from its circle of patrons worldwide. In 2010, the Museum completed a comprehensive renewal of its campus led by James Carpenter Design Associates, New York and Efrat-Kowalsky Architects, Tel Aviv, including the creation of new galleries, orientation facilities, and public spaces, and the complete reinstallation of its encyclopedic collections. The Museum also organizes and presents programming at its off-site locations in Jerusalem at the Rockefeller Archaeological Museum, where it presents archaeological artifacts from the Land of Israel; and at its historic Ticho House in downtown Jerusalem, a venue for exhibitions of contemporary Israeli art.

 

 

 

 

 Over 140 years ago, much before the establishment of the modern state of Israel, Sarona was born. The Templar settlers freshly arrived from Germany and with a pioneer's zeal, transformed the little hill that overlooked the sea into a bustling agricultural settlement that quickly drew the city's new citizens for both commerce and leisure.

 

Fate and history have colluded to change Sarona's face quite a few times since those early days, and today it can be seen returning with a sense of dignity to reclaim its rightful place as the city's epicenter.
The renewed space draws on the original Templar spirit and infuses it with the modern style and energy of contemporary Tel Aviv; a place first and foremost for locals to enjoy the best of the city in a serene setting.
Sarona - What is so special?

 

Sarona combines a unique architectural history with a dynamic urban experience. Together they create a center of shopping, leisure and a relaxed and upscale atmosphere. The renewed colony includes an urban park and the accurately restored original 37 buildings of the Templar settlement. These have been transformed into elegant cafes, ritzy restaurants, art galleries, an assortment of specialty shops and a home to famous and unique fashion houses & boutiques.
A few steps away from the bustle of the city with its traffic jams and honking horns awaits an oasis of relaxation that hasn't been seen since the days of the Templars themselves. Smart homes surrounded by fichus trees and lush lawns provide a magical sense of suspension from time and space. Here you will find wide, tree-lined paths that will make your steps light and your heart even lighter. In this oasis you will find select specialty stores featuring the best of brands and an unparalleled world of pleasure.
If you shut your eyes, you will easily be transported back to a time of elegance and fantastic stories. Sarona is a place where yesterday, today and tomorrow converge and create an intangible magic.

 

 

 Above all, Sarona offers its visitors freedom and options. Its vast open spaces make it an island of green in the heart of the city providing a wealth of options for leisure time. For those interested in History, the Visitor Center provides exhibitions that reveal the little and not-so-little stories that make up the riveting history that is known as Sarona.

 

For those seeking a colorful and vibrant urban experience, they are sure to find a wealth of options such as the farmer's market, street shows, book fairs and current cultural events that the Sarona team are constantly developing for the public's enjoyment.


Sarona is a respite for those wanting to escape the city's concrete jungle. By contrast, it offers lush green botanical gardens that replicate the agricultural nature of the original Templar settlement and provides peace, quiet and inspiration. Here you can lie down, shut your eyes under a massive Fichus tree and listen to the birds chirping.
As the sun sets, the space is transformed into an elegant destination for city revelers looking to let off steam after a hard day's work. Here, you will find the city's top restaurants, smart bars or retail options for your shopping craves.


List of Shops:
Fashion: Tommy Hilfiger; Brooks; Castro; Gal Halfon; Twentyfourseven; Razili; Fred Perry; Adidas; Sketch; Stussy; Coupleof; Imelda; Timberland; Seven; The North Face; Vans; Napapijri; Kipling; Diesel; G-Star; Studio-Noa; Liebeskind Berlin; Ole; Marilen; Luminary; Shoofra; Factory 54
Jewelry: Meyrav Shavit; Yanni B New York; Tamar Mani; Adina Plastelina; Ilana Magen; Rebekka; Beadart;
Special Stores: iDigital; Tzomet Sfarim; Gaya – games & puzzles; Toy Box;
Body care: L'Occitane; L'Occitane Spa, Laline, O.P.I Nail Boutique; Forget Me Not'


Design: SOHO; Ginger; Arbitman's
Art Galleries: Sarona Gallery: Art & Jewelry; Draydel House;

Dinning & Drinking: Jajo Wine Bar, Branja, Rustico, Little Italy (Trattoria; Vineria; Carnebirra; Picnic); Kampai; Akiko Sushi Bar; Biga; Landwer Café; Cafeneto; 110 Burger; Pizza Agvania; Oren Becker Boutique; Wilhelmina by Oren Becker; Tasting Room; Paulaner Beer Garden; Molly Bloom's Irish Pub; Cafetry; Anita boutique Ice cream; Vagnilia; Hamarkolit; Roy Chocolate café; Katarina; Roladin; Claro;

 

 

 

History

In 1871, on the western banks of the Ayalon River the Templars established the colony of Sarona. They were pious Christians who came from southern Germany who primarily engaged in agriculture and small industry. At the end of the World War I with the occupation of Palestine by the British Army the Templars were exiled to Egypt and only returned in 1921. During the British Mandate, the settlement flourished. Agricultural areas expanded and new houses were built in an international style, which added a modern touch to the rural landscape. With the outbreak of World War II, in September 1939, the British declared the German Templars 'enemy nationals'; the colony became a detention camp and its residents were exiled to Germany and Australia.


At the beginning of World War II, the British security forces began occupying the colony. After the war, the fortified camp became a military base for the British forces and naturally became a favored target for attacks by the different Jewish undergrounds—the Haganah, Etzel, and Lehi—and eventually a symbol of the armed struggle against the British rule.


In December 1947 the British handed over the Sarona camp to the Jewish leadership as it evacuated their forces from the greater Tel Aviv region. The new camp was called 'Mahaneh Yehoshua' (Camp Yehoshua), named after Yehoshua Globerman, commander of the Tel Aviv District for the Haganah. This was the first military camp under the independent and open command of Haganah. In May 1948, the government ministries were temporarily housed in some of the Templar homes as Jerusalem was under siege. The name 'Sarona' was changed by David Ben-Gurion to the 'Kiryah' (the Compound).


In December 1949 the government decided to relocate its offices to Jerusalem, the nation's capital. However, representatives and offices of most government ministries remained in the Kiryah, including the Prime Minister's Office. Only in the 2000s did the government offices vacate their historical buildings in Sarona in the southern section of the Kiryah and they were concentrated in the Yovel Tower on Menachem Begin Blvd. In 1955 the General Headquarters of the Israel Defense Forces was transferred from its national bureau in Ramat Gan to the northern section of the Kirya where it is located to this day.

 

In 2006 a plan to preserve 36 historical buildings was approved, so as to return them to their former façade from the time of the Templar settlement. The rest of the buildings were demolished. For the purpose of expanding Kaplan Street, five Templar buildings were relocated in a complex engineering feat. The Sarona compound is used as a center for culture, leisure and shopping and its visitors' center tells the story of its turbulent history and its important place as a national heritage site.


Restoration
Sarona embodies the pinnacle of urban renovation and restoration, both in Israel and Tel Aviv. After many years of hiding behind the barbed-wire walls (due to its governmental and military designation), Sarona is finally showing off its charms. Few people know how close the Sarona structures were to being destroyed due to the city's original urban plans. Fortunately, reason prevailed and their immense cultural and historic values were recognized. In the process, each and every detail were evaluated, catalogued and handled by the best craftsmen available. Special detail was given to the architecture and environment in order to maintain the utmost historic accuracy.


The complex engineering operation combined modern technology with a thorough knowledge of the past, artistic sensibilities and significant architectural skill. One of the biggest challenges involved the moving of entire historical buildings after it was decided to expand Kaplan Street. This more than ambitious project required the casting of concrete trays underneath each structure and inserting them on ski-like structures in order to move them in their entirety.

 

היזמים – Two groups: The Amta Group & The Irani Rogovin Group
Ganey Sarona (Amta) Ltd is comprised of leading companies and developers in the real estate field, in Israel and overseas:


Mydas Investment Fund Ltd., formerly known as Spancrete, was established in 1990, and operated as a private company for the manufacture of precast elements for construction. In 1993 it became a publicly-traded company, with the company's stocks registered for trading on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange. The company is headed by Ran Steinman, a qualified real estate appraiser, who has been working in real estate for some 15 years, and whose previous position was as a senior manager for the property and construction group IDB, and accountant Avishai Avraham, former CFO and vice-chairman of the Danshar Group. Since 2007 the company has purchased 10 senior citizens' homes in Britain, an office building in London which is rented to the British government, the Comfort Inn Notting Hill in London, and part of the Queen Mary tourist site in Long Beach, California. Today the company specializes in locating, purchase, and management of income generating properties in Israel, Britain, and the USA.


The Adler Chomsky Group is the largest marketing communications group in Israel. The Group was founded in 1997 by Reuven Adler and Eyal Chomsky, The Group owns 16 companies active in advertising, branding, design, media acquisition, interactive media, marketing and public relations. The Group has 420 employees and functions as a Business Network Hub for its companies and clients. Additionally, the Group owns various projects in the fields of income generating properties, retailing, industrial-marketing parks, industrial projects in Israel and abroad etc.


Mati Dov is an entrepreneur and business man. Dov previously served as CEO of Azorim. Among other ventures, he is active in establishing and marketing luxury housing projects.
The Irani Rogovin partnership is comprised of two companies, leaders in the field of real estate investment and development – Avraham Irani Investments and Trade Co. Ltd. and Efraim Rogovin Ltd.


Avraham Irani Investments and Trade Co. Ltd., owned by the Irani family, and managed by Eytan Irani, CEO of the company was established in 1965. Initially, it was active in the capital and financial markets and considered a significant factor in the field. When the sector was established in Israel, the company became the owner of the Central Securities Corporation brokerage. Over the years, the company has developed and acquired residential buildings and commercial income generating properties in central locations, and has made it its goal to invest in projects with high, unique added value, which reflects its spirit of entrepreneurship, including the extremely special Sarona project. Today, the company deals with a variety of investments, particularly in the real estate field, in both Israel and overseas, as well as the technology and biomed industries.

 

Efraim Rogovin Ltd. is one of the oldest and foremost of Israel's construction and development companies. Today the company specializes in a wide range of fields in real estate, including initiating and building residential, office, and commercial construction, and holding and management of income generating property. Professional, stable, and reliable management which promotes gradual and controlled development, based on financial strength over many years – is what has led Rogovin to promote and develop many projects throughout Israel which have left their mark on their surroundings. Within the field of income generating property Rogovin Ltd. owns properties in central locations including the business, shopping, and Hi-tech areas of Tel Aviv, Ramat Hahayal, Raanana, Ramat Gan, Herzliya Pituah, and southern Netanya. These properties allow the company a basis of a strong, stable income which contributes to its steady development. They are noted for their quality, aesthetics, and clever planning, and provide an ideal solution to clients' varying needs and lifestyles.

 

 Photos  Silvia  Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Moments of Passion" Argentine Tango Dance Show

Cris and Lilach have long dreamed of building a family and to propagate the Argentine Tango in Israel with a dancing troupe.

This year they realized their dream and gathered the most talented dancers in Israel to form the troupe.

Members of their "360 Tango dance company" include some of the best known dancers in the country

(appeared in the Dancing with the stars shows and other famous dance groups).

They learned the different Argentine Tango rules and overcame all the difficulties and are ready for their:

Gala Performance "Moments of Passion" on the 23 of August 21:00 at the Suzan Dalal Center as part of the "Macholohet" Festival.


The dance show includes 22 original choreographies representing a mixture of Argentine Tango with modern and salon dance.

 

The Duarte couple:

After ten years in Argentina and Hungary, Lilach (Mor) Duarte returned to Israel with her Argentine husband Cristian after a most successful career in South America and Europe with the goal to settle and bring the authentic Argentinean tango to Israel. Lilach danced in Israel from a very young age in all different disciplines such as ballet, modern, jazz, flamenco. Steps and more. At the age of 18 she travelled to Broadway to appear in a musical, but she always felt that something was missing. After her studies in the Wingate College she continued to South America and there she found her real passion in dance, the Argentinean Tango. According to her, all her travels were meant to lead her to this. The connection,.satisfaction, hardship, inner work never ends. Tango is not just a dance, but becomes an integral part of those who dance

Cris met Lilach in Buenos Aires 5 years ago when he already was a highly thought of tango dancer and instructor for 10 years in one of the most desired tango schools. In addition to his high level of accomplishment in the martial arts and through the tango love sprang and the uniqueness of their relationship was evident in their intense dancing. The largest and most prestigious dance schools in Hungary were so impressed by them that they contracted them to spend two years bringing the authentic Argentinean Tango to Hungary. During these two years in Budapest, Cris and Lilach were invited to perform with the most famous singers in the prestigious Opera stages of Europe in front of 12,000 spectators.

After all this, the couple decided to plant roots in Israel and to form a Tango community with plans to propagate unity and harmony between its members.

 They are teaching in Tel Aviv on Tuesdays, Master classes to advance students and on the other hand are developing the Hadera, Pardes Hana, and Yizrael Valley to raise a new tango community.

Tickets for the Gala Performance "Moments of Passion" are available at the Suzan Dalal Ticket office 03-5105656 or at their website.

 

 http://www.360tango.com/

Dear friends we are so happy to invite you to enjoy a dream coming true.
Our dance groups Premier of a special unusual Tango show combining contemporary and ballroom dances with the highest level of dancers here in Israel.
Don't miss the opportunity...

Cris & Lilach

Tickets:
Phone: 03-5105656
web: suzannedellal.org.il/?CategoryID=171&ArticleID=1346

 

 

 Photos provided by  Lilach Mor Duarte  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pottery sherds discovered by an Israel Antiquities Authority inspector several months ago, during extensive work by the Netivei Israel - National Transport Infrastructure Company, Ltd. on the new Highway 1 project resulted in an archaeological excavation in which a previously unknown settlement from the Late Second Temple period was discovered, as well as a rare hoard of coins that was found in one of its houses. The hoard, which was kept in a ceramic money box, included 114 bronze coins dating to the Year Four of the Great Revolt against the Romans. This revolt led to the destruction of the Temple on Tisha B'Av (the ninth day of the month of Av) c. 2,000 years ago.

 

According to Pablo Betzer and Eyal Marco, excavation directors on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "The hoard, which appears to have been buried several months prior to the fall of Jerusalem, provides us with a glimpse into the lives of Jews living on the outskirts of Jerusalem at the end of the rebellion. Evidently someone here feared the end was approaching and hid his property, perhaps in the hope of collecting it later when calm was restored to the region". All of the coins are stamped on one side with a chalice and the Hebrew inscription "To the Redemption of Zion" and on the other side with a motif that includes a bundle of lulav between two etrogs. Around this is the Hebrew inscription "Year Four", that is, the fourth year of the Great Revolt of the Jews against the Romans (69/70 CE).

 

The hoard was concealed in the corner of a room, perhaps inside a wall niche or buried in the floor. Two other rooms and a courtyard belonging to the same building were exposed during the course of the archaeological excavation. The structure was built in the first century BCE and was destroyed in 69 or 70 CE when the Romans were suppressing the Great Revolt. Early in the second century CE part of the building was reinhabited for a brief period, which culminated in the destruction of the Jewish settlement in Judea as a result of the Bar Kokhba rebellion. This is attested to by three complete jars that were discovered embedded in the courtyard floor.

 

It seems that the residents of this village, like most of the Jewish villages in Judea, were active participants in both of the major uprisings against the Romans – the Great Revolt and the Bar Kokhba Revolt. As a result of their involvement the place was destroyed twice, and was not resettled.

The Israel Antiquities Authority and Netivei Israel Company are examining the possibility of preserving the village remains within the framework of the landscape development alongside the highway.

 

Today (Tuesday), between the hours of 12:00–14:00, journalists are invited to the Israel Antiquities Authority laboratories at 5 Ha-Marpeh Street, Har Hotzvim, where they can photograph the hoard and interview the excavation director. No parking facilities are available on Har Hotzvim and it is therefore suggested visitors arrive by means of public transportation. Kindly confirm your arrival by email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

 Photographic credit: Vladimir Niihin, courtesy of the Israel Antiquities Authority

 

The hoard as it was found in the excavation.
Pablo Betzer, IAA District Archaeologist for Judah, with a coin from the Year Four of the Great Revolt.
A coin from the Year Four of the Great Revolt.

 

 

 

The Jerusalem Film Festival has invited the Dominican actor, Mr. Erlyn Saul Rodriguez and screenwriter Fernando Blanco to participate in it.

In turn, the Embassy of the Dominican Republic in Israel has recently promoted several cultural activities in the State of Israel, including two nights of Dominican film in the cities of Tel Aviv and Raanana.

 

Also in talks with the authorities of the mentioned Festival, it was proposed to sign an Agreement with the Department of Cinema and Global Film Festival, to promote Dominican films in various Cinematheques in Israel and vice versa, as well as the possibility of develop a joint film production Dominican Republic-Israel.

 

Similarly, the Dominican Embassy in Israel is promoting a participation in the upcoming Dominican Film Festival Haifa, which will be held in October 2014.

The Dominican films night held in the city of Tel Aviv, counted with the collaboration of the Honorary Consul General of the Dominican Republic in Tel Aviv, Mr. Amnon Matalon, who is the distributor of the famous films enterprises Columbia, Fox and Sony.

 

Attended to this event, members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the State of Israel, scholars from different research centers and universities, special guests and the Dominican community in this country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27th Dance Festival in Karmiel  ......................Messi?    Russo!

Gustavo Russo's famous tango dance group from Argentina arrives to the Dance Festival with Karmiel in a new program.

Due to the great demand, it is recommended to order your tickets in advance.

While Argentina's football is doing greatly in the 2014 Football World Cup, Gustavo Russo's famous tango group arrives from Buenos Aires to the 27th Dance Festival in Karmiel with his new presentation, Tango In Red Major, a colorful dance performance, accompanied by a great orchestra. Russo, a choreographer and creator of Buenos Aires new generation, was highly acclaimed with his previous creation, Tango Seduction, exhibited in Israel and the world with great success.

His new creation, Tango In Red Major, is contemporary with the traditional tango rhythm and of futuristic ideas. Gustavo Russo, a gifted dancer, together with his wife Samantha, leads a group of 20 virtuosic dancers in a colorful, lively, bright and elegant presentation, accompanied by a great orchestra that plays well known tango pieces in surprising arrangements. The show is a true delight for all Tango and Latin rhythm lovers.

Aharon Solomon, Festival General Manager, says: "Gustavo Russo's tango returns to Karmiel with a new performance for tango lovers in Israel. Due to the great demand, the company will appear twice in Karmiel's Cultural Hall (היכל התרבות כרמיאל), on Wednesday 7/9 and Thursday 7/10, and in other places in Israel: Jerusalem, Tel-Aviv, Kiryat Haim, Beer Sheva, Herzliya, Rehovot, Modiin and Ashkelon. I recommend to all the interested public to acquire tickets in advance."

The company members are considered among the best dancers in Buenos Aires. They bring to the stage a true expression to this immortal dance. The musicians that accompany the dancers present a new interpretation to the most famous tango pieces as well as the new ones.

Gustavo Russo and his wife Samantha Garcia initiate a revolution in the tango dance on stage, thanks to their incredible creativity and talent. This is an enchanting and demonstrative exhibition where art is expressed not only in the dance style, but also in its presentation, which combines surrealistic scenes with sarcastic and contemporary touch. The public is invited to a journey to the hidden side of tango.

 

Tickets
3-7 Jerusalem Theatre tel : * 6226 Bimot / 02-6237000 / 02-5605575 www.jerusalem-theatre.co.il

4-7 Kiriat Haim www.theatron-hazafon.co.il 04-8629959 04-8401057/8

5-7 Beer Sheva Performing Arts Center 08-6266400 www..mishkan7.co.il
6-7 Hertzliya Performing Arts Center 1-700-702929 www.hoh-herzliya.co.il
7-7 Rehovot Weizmann Institute of Science Wix Auditorium 08-9467890 08-9364979 08-9343185 www.weizmann.ac.il
9-7 Karmiel Culture Hall Tel 04-9881111 www.karmielfestival.co.il
10-7 Karmiel Culture Hall Tel 04-9881111 www.karmielfestival.co.il
11-7 Tel Aviv Opera House Tel 03-6927777 www.israel-opera.co.il
12-7 Modiin Culture Hall 08-9737333
13-7 Ahskelon Culture Hall 08-6718777

 

More info : Silvia G. Golan

03-6953819 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Facebook Silvia G Golan
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 Photo provided by the tango in Red Major Production 

 

 

 

 

 

Works from the Igal Ahouvi Art Collection

 

Curator: Sarit Shapira

 

4.7.14 –6.9.14

 

The exhibition Potent Wilderness, the second part of the Babylon Trilogy, deals with the scorched earth on the one end, and the remnants of life on the other, left after the ‘fall of the towers’ of Western culture in the modern age.

 

The exhibition features works that assess a chain of disasters from the distance of time and through a memory that also offers processes of forgetting-amnesia-partial erasure of national and personal tragedies. It emphasizes the engagement with ‘catastrophe’ from the distance of time, through works by young ‘second’ and ‘third generation’ artists and, on the 40th anniversary of the Yom Kippur War, features works that deal with the pain and the loss that accompanied the events of that war, employing a conceptual language crystalized in the 1970s.

 

The show, comprising installations, video works, projections, painting, sculpture and photography by renowned international artists and established and up and coming Israeli artists, reveals the collection’s devotion to foundational and ground-breaking figures in the history of Israeli art.

 

The show includes works by the artists:

Gabriel Orozco, Charles Avery, Darren Almond, Richard Artschwager, Joseph Beuys, Avner Ben Gal, Ido Bar-El, Tamar Getter, Rodney Graham, Dror Daum, Christopher Williams, Andy Warhol, Elad Lassry, Bruce Nauman, Ido Michaeli, Christian Marclay, Ruti Nemet, Doris Salcedo, Eli Petel, George Condo, Moshe Kupferman, Jean Cocteau, David Claerbout, Martin Creed, Elham Rokni, Efrat Shvili,Gil Marco Shani and others.

 

A major part focuses on minimalist and conceptual works included in the collection, by artists such as Joseph Beuys, Martin Creed, Darren Almond, Bruce Nauman, Moshe Kupferman, Tamar Getter, Benni Efrat and Ido Bar-El. Another part reveals a different dialect of contemporary art represented in the collection: Pop Art and the links between the avant-garde and the media. Images that have emerged into the world from a ‘Pandora’s Box’ opened after the ‘great falls’ and from the hybridization and linguistic debris of an ‘old world order’. The artists who belong to this group include Raymond Pettibon, Elad Lassry and Elad Larom.

 

Nomadism, journeys and migration are central images and avenues of activity in contemporary art and culture. In the context of the exhibition, these subjects coincide with the dispersion of Babylon’s builders to all the corners of the earth after the tower’s construction had been stopped. As in the contemporary television series The Vikings, an ancient history is etched with current hues, as biblical memories about the gouging out of King Zedekiah’s eyes during the Second Babylonian Exile are considered in relation to images of blindness in contemporary art. Thus we encounter visions of shadows, light versus darkness, journeys in the dark (Elham Rokni), an interrupted journey towards the horizon (Doug Aitken), the figure of the nomad (Avner Ben Gal) or the preparation of instruments of passage based on ancient images (Joseph Beuys). These journeys summon wisdom, erudition and historical memories in which an ‘exiled’ culture has given rise to a knowledge-rich corpus. The memories of the Babylonian Exile are evoked through images of the Beth Midrash (in a painting by Gil Shani), the National Library (in a photograph by Ariel Caine) and the figure of Maimonides (in an installation by Ido Michaeli).

 

A variety of activities will be held in the gallery as part of the exhibition, including lectures, gallery talks with artists and curators, tours, workshops and guided activities for children.

 

Alongside the exhibition Potent Wilderness the University Gallery will be showing the solo exhibition Masha Zusman: Side Wind, winner of the Michel KikoïnePrize for 2013.

 

 

The Genia Schreiber University Art Gallery

Tel Aviv University, Entin Square, Corner of Haim Levanon and Einstein St.

03-6408860

 Opening hours: Sun-Wed 11am-7pm, Thu: 11am-9pm, Fri 10am-2pm

 

https://www.facebook.com/IgalAhouviArtCollection?ref=ts&fref=ts

 

 

 

0504.jpg

Andy Warhol
Bangkok Thailand, 1956
Ballpoint ink and construction paper on manila paper

 

Photograph courtesy of Timothy Taylor Gallery,London 

 

אנדי וורהול

בנגקוק תאילנד, 1956

 עט כדורי, בריסטול על נייר

 

הדימוי באדיבות גלריה טימוטי טיילור, לונדון

0934.jpg

Joseph Beuys

Fluxusobjekt, 1962

Vitrine with cardboard box, fat, oil, broom, rubber ring, toy

ג'וזף בויס

פלוקסוסאובייקט, 1962

קופסת קרטון, שומן, שמן, מטאטא, טבעת גומי, צעצוע

1021.jpg

Martin Creed
Work No. 1142
2011
Acrylic on canvasPhoto: Hugo Glendinning
Image courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth

מרטין קריד

עבודה מס.1142, 2011

אקריליק על בד

 

צילום: הוגו גלנדינניג

הדימוי באדיבות האמן וגלריה האוזר אנד ווירת'

 

 

 

 

1022.jpg

Martin Creed
Work No. 1117
2011
Acrylic on canvasPhoto: Hugo Glendinning
Image courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth

מרטין קריד

עבודה מס.1117, 2011

אקריליק על בד

 

צילום: הוגו גלנדינניג

הדימוי באדיבות האמו וגלריה האוזר אנד ווירת'

1129.jpg

Tamar Getter
Zvika Force, 1974 - 1978
Blackboard paint, classroom chalk, manipulated photo on vinyl sheet

תמר גטר

כוח צביקה, 1974-1978

צבע לוח, גיר וצילום מעבד על יריעת ויניל

 

1352.jpg

Christopher Williams
Cutaway model Nikon Em. Shutter: Electronically governed Seiko metal blade shutter, vertical travel with speeds from 1/1000 to 1 second, with a manual speed of 1/90th. Meter: Center-weighted Silicon Photo Diode, ASA 25-1600, EV 2-18 [with ASA film and 1.8 lens]. Aperture Priority automatic exposure.,Lens Mount: Nikon F mount, Al coupling [and later] only. Flash: Synchronization at 1/90 via hot shoe. Flash automation with Nikon SB-E or SB-10 flash units. Focusing: K type focusing screen, not user interchangeable, with 3mm diagonal split image rangefinder. Batteries: Two PX-76 or equivalent.
Dimensions: 5.3" x 3.38" x 2.13" [135mm x 86mm x 54mm], 16.2 oz [460g]. Fotostudio Axel Gnad, DüsseldorfOctober 17, 2008 [b&w], 2009

Gelatin silver print

 

 

 

3.38" x 2.13" [135mm x 86mm x

54mm], 16.2 oz [460g].

Fotostudio Axel Gnad, Düsseldorf

October 17, 2008 [b&w], 2009

כריסטופר וויליאמס

דגם חתך (ניקון), 2009

תצלום שחור-לבן, הדפס כסף ג'לטיני,

הדימוי באדיבות האמן וגלריה דיוויד צווירנר

 

 

1358.jpg

Ido Michaeli
Maimonides
 Attire, 2011
V
ideo installation and statue

 

Installation view: Hakibbutz Gallery

Photography: Ran Arda

עידו מיכאלי

חליפתו של הרמב"ם, 2011

הצבה פיסולית ועבודת וידיאו

 

צילום הצבה בגלריה הקיבוץ

צילום: רן ארדה

 

 

F:\Babel\Catalogue\Images Elad Sarig\04052014 (edited)\Ahuvi_023B.jpg

Richard Artschwager
Coffin, 1995
Plywood with screws and brackets

 

Photographed by Elad Sarig

 

ריצ'רד ארטצ'ווגר

ארון קבורה, 1995

עץלבוד, ברגים ותומכים

 

צילום: אלעד שריג

Ahuvi_092.jpg

Elad Lassry
Onions, 2012
C-print, painted frame

 

Photographed by Elad Sarig

 

אלעד לסרי

בצלים, 2012

צילום צבע ומסגרת צבועה

 

צילום: אלעד שריג

1536.jpg

Gil Marco Shani

Synagogue, 2012

Oil on canvas

 

גיל מרקו שני

בית כנסת, 2012

שמן על בד

 

 

RG443.jpg

Rodney Graham
Cactus Fan, 2013
Painted aluminum light box with transmounted chromogenic transparency

רודני גרהם

רודני גראהם, בעניין של קקטוסים, 2013, שקף כרומוגני בתיבת אור מאלומיניום צבוע

 

 



 

 

 

 The UNESCO World Heritage Committee has declared the caves of Beit Guvrin-Maresha to be a World Heritage Site.

The UNESCO World Heritage Committee, currently meeting in Qatar, yesterday (22 June 2014), by consensus, declared the caves of Beit Guvrin-Maresha to be a World Heritage Site.

This Israeli site will now be included in this prestigious list of extraordinary cultural sites from around the world.

The candidacy of Beit Guvrin-Maresha was extensively prepared by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs along with the Israel Nature and Parks Authority, the Israeli World Heritage Committee and others. This site is the latest addition to the other Israeli sites already listed as part of World Heritage: Tel Aviv White City, Masada, the Biblical Tels, the Incense Route, the Baha'i Holy Shrines in Haifa, the Old City of Acre, and the Nahal Me'arot Nature Reserve, listed in 2012.

 

Bet Guvrin-Maresha National Park 

 http://old.parks.org.il/BuildaGate5/general2/data_card.php?Cat=~25~~131474600~Card12~&ru=&SiteName=parks&Clt=&Bur=519778975

 

 

 

 

 

 

A special citation will be conferred by the B'nai B'rith World Center upon Israeli musician and composer Nurit Hirsh in recognition of her contribution to fostering Israel-Diaspora through the arts. The citation will be presented on Sunday, June 29 2014, in recognition of Hirsh's contribution to Jewish and Israeli culture, both in Israel and around the world.

 

The citation will be presented at B'nai B'rith World Center's 22nd annual Award for Journalism Recognizing Excellence in Diaspora Reportage for 2014 that will take place at 19:30 at Menachem Begin Heritage Center in Jerusalem. The B'nai B'rith World Center Award is widely acknowledged in the media industry as the most prestigious prize in its field in Israel. Winners of the award for 2014 are Matan Hodorov, chief economic correspondent for Channel 10 News and Judy Maltz, senior writer for Ha'aretz. A Lifetime Achievement Award in memory of Luis and Trudi Schydlowsky will also be presented to David Horovitz, founding editor of the Times of Israel and former editor-in-chief of the Jerusalem Post and Jerusalem Report for his dedication to extended Diaspora reportage over a 30-year career.

 

In the considerations for the citation to Nurit Hirsh it is noted that she has represented the State of Israel around the world for over 50 years through more than 1,500 songs that she composed and many moving performances in which she brought great honor to the State of Israel. Her songs have been published in a collection of six books and thirteen CDs. Many of her songs have are popular also in Diaspora communities and serve as a bridge, a language and a source of shared identity between Israel and Jewish communities around the world, between the communities and within the communities themselves.

 

Nurit Hirsh – singer, composer and conductor – is symbolizes the songs of Eretz Israel, also reflected in the music she composed for movies, musicals and many plays including "Policeman Azulay" and "Salach Shabati". Many of her songs are considered classics in the Jewish and Hebrew repertoire and have become inalienable assets. She merges in her songs and performances cultures and ethnic groups, and her compositions have contributed to Jewish and Israeli culture. Her songs such as "Ose Shalom Be'Mromav" (Making Peace from on High) is sung at synagogues around the world and has become a folk song that is sung in churches and at ceremonies by American presidents Bill Clinton and Barak Obama.

 

Nurit Hirsh chooses the lyrics to her songs from the Bible, prayer and Israeli poets in addition to personal songs reflecting universal themes. Her songs have been translated to many languages including English, Spanish, Japanese, Greek, Turkish, and Korean and are sung all over the world. This tremendous corpus of outstanding work produced over such a long period is undoubtedly a lifetime achievement and earns Nurit Hirsh the title of Israel's national composer.

 

Photo : Ilan Bsor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The reenactment of one of the most significant battles of the Middle Ages -the Historical Battle of the "Horns of Hattin" will take place on the anniversary of the fateful day (July 3 – 5), and include a two-day journey culminating in the reenactment of the battle itself.


Every year, the historical reenactment by the "Regnum Hierosolymitanum Club", along with the "Jerusalem Traditional Archery Club", reconstructs the historical events surrounding the battle in the actual landscape and in conditions similar to the original ones. Almost all of Israel's historical clubs participate in this event as well as visitors from overseas.
This project is based on significant academic research carried out on archeological finds at the battlefields.


The Horns of Hattin March is a living historical event. All attendees actively participate in the reenactment and are assigned to one of the two armies, the King of Jerusalem's (Gui de Lusignan) or Salah ad-Din's army. Characters include knights, a professional mercenary, members of the military order, Mamelukes, pilgrims, countrymen, city dwellers, Bedouins, musicians, and others. The march is a dynamic real-time event.
"We are in July of 1187 and are facing an all-out war with full mobilization. Ahead of us is a 30-kilometer march over two days to the Sea of Galilee. The march includes a large number of people and animals moving over complex terrain and in extreme weather conditions... Probably not everyone will reach the sea...".
Time: Kingdom of Jerusalem: from 1099 to 1187.
Area: Middle East, Kingdom of Jerusalem, Outremer, Byzantium, West Europe.

 

About the "Regnum Hierosolimitanum":

The "Regnum Hierosolimitanum" group carries out historical reenactments ("living history") of significant events occurring at the time of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. The main period they focus on is the second and third quarter of the XII century, before the destruction of the Kingdom, which followed the disaster at the Battle of Hattin in 1187.
During the journey - (July 3-5) There will be various stops along the way, near the Zippori river, inside Hoshaya - in the village KEDEM, Lavi Forest (approximately one km from the Golani Junction).


The project organizer - Gindi Niz'nik, is an expert in medieval and biblical archeology and the head of the "Kingdom of Jerusalem" club.
Historical Background: Karnei Hittin is believed to be the site of the Battle of Hattin, Saladin's victory over the Crusaders in 1187.
The Muslim armies under Saladin captured or killed the vast majority of the Crusader forces, removing their capability to wage war. As a direct result of the battle, Islamic forces once again became the eminent military power in the Holy Land, re-conquering Jerusalem and several other Crusader-held cities.


The battle took place near Tiberias, in present day Israel. The battlefield, near the town of Hittin, had as its chief geographic feature a double hill (the "Horns of Hattin"),

More information about the "Battle of Hattin" can be found on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Hattin

 

 

 

   For more information, please contact:  Aviva Shwartz,

Tel:   972-52-3244769

 

Photos : Alisa Stav

 

 

 

Friday, June 27, 2014 at 11:00 | The Museum Tower 19th floor, 4 Berkowitz St., Tel Aviv

Lecturer: Dr. Ayelet Zohar, Tel Aviv University

The lecture will be held in Hebrew

Morimura Yasumasa (森村泰昌 b. 1951, Osaka) is the Artistic Director of the coming 5th Triennale of Yokohama that will open in Aug. 2014. Morimura, one of the most significant and leading figures of photography In Japan, a person who had nearly single-handedly changed the language of 1970s photography, when presenting a novel method of expression that raised far-reaching dilemmas in relation to the tension between photography and reality. Morimura made his name with his series Daughter of Art History which he created in the 1980s, his Actress series of the 1990s, and Requiem to the XX Century in the 2000s. In all three series Morimura raised essential issues regarding relations between Japan and the West – in the context of high, canonical and museum art; in the context of popular culture and cinema; and within the context of photography, photojournalism and new media.

The Yokohama Triennale 2014 will be held from August 1 to November 3, 2014 at the museum at the pier of Yokohama, Japan. Yokohama Triennale is one of the most important art events in Japan. It takes place once every three years in the piers and old town of Yokohama area. The first Triennale was installed in 2001 and this year will be its fifth celebration.

The selection of artists on display includes famous international names (such as Andy Warhol, Marcel Broodthaers, Joseph Cornell and René Magritte among others), young and unknown artists (such as Masahiro Wada, Yuko Mohri, Melvin Moti etc.), and mid-career artists that gradually climb up the ladder to fame, and the Triennale serves as an excellent platform for the continuity of their success (Miwa Yanagi, Toyoda Hitoshi, Michael Landy and more).

The main theme of the Yokohama Triennale 2014 is ART Fahrenheit 451: Sailing into the Sea of Oblivion. By this concept, the Triennale team -- that accompanies Morimura in his endeavours -- plans to challenge issues concerning the link between past and present.

In her lecture, Dr. Ayelet Zohar will tell us about Morimura's work, the history of Yokohama Triennale,

the concept and challenge of the coming one – hoping to encourage Israeli audiences to visit Japan to see the event.

*Dr. Ayelet Zohar is transdisciplnary artist, independent curator and a researcher of visual culture, specializing in the history and theory of photography in Japan, and a lecturer at the Art History Dept., Tel Aviv University.

Registration

 Embassy of Japan This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 Israel Japan Friendship Society
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

פקס: 03-5164748 Fax

 

Photo provided by Japan Embassy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Laila Lavan (White Night) is a special annual event held in Tel-Aviv where the city's cultural venues stay open all night and other activities and attractions are on offer, many for free. In 2014 Tel-Aviv Laila Lavan will be held at June 26th.

The term "White Night" may come from Tel-Aviv's nickname "White City" because of the large concentration of Bauhaus architecture, but the phrase is also Israeli army slang for a night of continual activity with no sleep. This will be Tel-Aviv's 11th White Night event in the city that never sleeps.

The events of Laila Lavan take place throughout the city in the Florentin neighborhood, along Rothschild Boulevard, in the port area, along the beach front and in other locations. Museums are opened to the public for free and special free concerts and lectures are organized. Many of the city's businesses stay open for the night; tours of the city are held and many restaurants and cafes go out of their way to offer something special for the all-night revelers.

 

 

Some of the scheduled events for Laila Lavan 2014 include, kid's art workshops in Bialik Square; free opera performances in the Tel-Aviv Opera House; street performances along Rothschild Boulevard; a Bollywood dance workshop on Gordon Beach; ballroom dancing in Habima Square; all night screenings at the Tel-Aviv Cinematheque; street performers in the Jaffa Flea Market and if you've stayed awake all night there will be sunrise yoga in Tel-Aviv port. 

 

 

 

 

 

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"Tom's Diner" is a new high-energy romantic comedy stage musical in English, produced in Israel by English On Stage.  The story of "Tom's Diner" is original, and its score boasts an impressive collection of songs from the 1960's, featuring hits by The Beatles, Elvis, The Shirelles, The Cookies, and Jerry Lee Lewis, to name a few.Set in a small-town American diner in the revolutionary 1960's, an intriguing newcomer arrives at a small-town American diner, causing a stir in the seemingly-perfect townspeople.  At the heart of this story reside love, unrequited dreams, and a glimpse into "The Feminine Mystique".
The show itself is enthusiastically driven by a production team made up of talented and trained theater professionals, including Israeli recent and former "olim" (immigrants) from English-speaking countries including the United States, England, and South Africa, as well as a few "tzabars" (Israelis).  The youthful cast is made up of triple-threats, acting, singing, and dancing with such extraordinary talent it's no wonder audiences are easily reliving their fondest memories, singing along and dancing in the aisles at each show.English On Stage is a professional English-language traveling theater in Israel founded in 2005, focusing on original quality productions for various ages.
Tom's Diner is its first large-scale musical production primarily for the adult crowd (but family-friendly similar to many hit Broadway productions).
 
For clips from the show and audience testimonials, watch this video:  v=FWn2BtyWDTg
 
Featuring: Or Mashiah, Nitzan Sitzer, Tamar Bettelheim, Mimi Tanaman, Lianne Ratzersdorfer, Noeat Kedem, Shiran Gross, Israel Goldrat, Meirav Zur.
Written & Directed by: Meirav Zur
Musical Director: Patrick Kelly
Choreography: Yaella Marinberg
Costumes & Set: Wendy Lehmann
Production Assistants: Maddy Levine, Nina Chubalashvili.
Tom's Diner 
Next show:  Saturday, June 14, 20:30.
At Mofet Theater, 22 Levin Epstein St., Rehovot.
Tickets: https://www.tixwise.co.il/en/tomsdinerinrehovot 
 
 
For more info: 
Website:  http://www.englishonstage.co.il
Facebook Page:  http://www.facebook.com/
 
 
Photos provided by English on Stage  / Meirav Zur
 
 
 
 
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