Japan Photo Contest 2017


Commemorating the 65th Anniversary of Diplomatic Relations between Japan and Israel


More information:


http://www.israel.emb-japan.go.jp/html/PhotoContest2017.html

AIPAC began its annual Policy Conference today with moving remarks by Chemi Peres and Yousef Qaraja, a 12-year-old Palestinian boy who was born with a heart defect and treated through a healthcare program that was initiated by President Shimon Peres and works to save children's lives. Qaraja: "For me and for my friend Shimon Peres- continue working toward peace"

At the opening of the conference, AIPAC screened a video that they produced, documenting the story of Yousef Qaraja's life saving treatment:

https://vivacreative.box.com/s/a6gjzij0uyu1ovrsqpcjnmai9flb5wj7

 

The Haruv Children’s Campus is now opening in Jerusalem, the first center of its kind for treating child victims of abuse and neglect that brings together all the professional workers and required services unto one location, which will significantly alleviate the therapeutic process for maltreated children.

 

THE CENTER WILL ENABLE, FOR THE FIRST TIME, THE INTEGRATION OF GROUND-BREAKING ACADEMIC KNOWLEDGE WITH ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN PROGRESSIVE TREATMENT METHODS

 

The phenomenon of child abuse and neglect is a harsh reality, with 40,000 cases of child maltreatment reported annually in Israel. A study done at Haifa University, published last year, presents a far bleaker picture and indicates that nearly half of all Israeli children have endured violence or abuse in the course their lives.

The Haruv Children’s Campus, located at Mt. Scopus, adjacent to the Hadassah Hospital and Hebrew University, will serve maltreated children, victims of abuse and neglect, by addressing their needs comprehensively, in the aim to empower the care currently provided, by partnering up with all the leading organizations that provide treatment for these children.

 

 

 

 

The campus brings together the entire range of professional workers and services: the Schusterman Emergency Center, the Center for Protection of the Child (Beit-Lynn), a treatment center for child victims of sexual abuse (Meital), the National Council for the Child, the SHEKEL Therapeutic Treatment Unit, Maavarim – Jerusalem Center for Family and Marriage Counselling, MSR - the Center for Social Simulation, and the Goshen Initiative. Additionally, community-based advocacy services will be offered, as well as clinical and treatment services provided by physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, lawyers, social workers and occupational therapists.

 

In the past, many professionals raised the issue of a systemic failure to identify child victims of maltreatment. One reason was the difficulty encountered in consistently transmitting and sharing information between the children’s various care-givers, who were also frequently bound by confidentiality and secrecy in their contact with the children, a fact that hindered providing more effective help to the children and their parents. An inter-ministerial committee, established following the murder of the little girl, Rose Pizem, emphasized the need for developing innovative strategies of collaboration between professionals to enable early detection and prevention of child abuse and neglect.

 

 

 

Prof. Asher Ben Arieh, executive director of the Haruv Institute and founder of the campus, adds: “This campus is a new model of the ‘one-stop shop’, stemming from the belief that there is a real and significant need for the physical concentration of all the service organizations, amongst other things in order to prevent the occurrence of cases ‘falling between the cracks’. The synergy born of this cooperative work model will promote the professional enrichment of the care-giving bodies, improve the accessibility of the services and facilitate providing maltreated children with comprehensive, state-of-the-art professional care that can address all their needs. The cooperation between all the organizations will enhance the contribution of each of the partners, creating a whole that is greater than its parts.”

 

Much thought was invested in the planning and design of the campus, taking into consideration the needs of the children and their families. Throughout the campus calming elements have been introduced, such as water, pastoral greenery, play areas created from natural materials and seating areas in warm, pleasant colors. The interior spaces have colorful play rooms, work areas that provide privacy, and a school and kindergarten for children at the emergency center.

 

 

 

The establishment of the campus, led by the Haruv Institute, was made possible thanks to the fruitful cooperation between the Ministry of Welfare, the Haruv Institute, the National Insurance Institute, the Jerusalem Municipality and the Hebrew University, and through the generous support of the Schusterman-Israel Foundation and JDC Israel. Prof. Yossi Tamir, executive director of JDC Israel adds, “As an innovative model worldwide, this campus will serve as a magnet drawing to it the finest researchers, professionals and students. Thus the campus will serve as both a research and treatment center, the first of its kind, and will be the home for unique and leading innovations.”

 

Photos Silvia Golan

 

 

 

 

 

 

Israeli students win int'l business arbitration competition

Students from Israel's College of Law and Business (CLB) in Ramat Gan have won the International Chamber of Commerce's Mediation Competition.

Students from Israel's College of Law and Business (CLB) in Ramat Gan have won the International Chamber of Commerce's Mediation Competition, which was held in Paris last week. This is the world's foremost competition on the subjects of business arbitration and dispute resolution.

 

 

 

JERUSALEM, ISRAEL – Some 27,000 immigrants arrived in Israel in 2016, according to estimates by The Jewish Agency for Israel and the Ministry of Aliyah and Immigrant Absorption, compared to the 31,000 who arrived in 2015. Aliyah (immigration to Israel) from Russia and Brazil rose significantly over the past year, while immigration from France and Ukraine dipped. The data released today is preliminary but offers solid indications of Aliyah trends for the past year. The final statistics will be made available mid-January, as they are every year.

 

Some 7,000 immigrants arrived in Israel from Russia, which topped the Aliyah chart in 2016, compared to 6,600 who arrived in 2015. Approximately 5,500 immigrants arrived from Ukraine, compared to the 7,221 who came last year. An estimated 5,000 new immigrants came from France, compared to 7,900 in 2015. Aliyah from the United States hit 2,900 immigrants, compared to 3,070 last year. These four leading sources of Aliyah also led the list in 2015 and 2014, although France—which led the chart in recent years—has slipped to third place.

 

Aliyah from Brazil increased significantly, with the arrival of some 760 new immigrants this year, compared to 497 in 2015. 620 immigrants arrived from Belarus (compared to 600 last year), 650 from the United Kingdom (775), and 272 from South Africa (236).

 

Immigration to Israel has come to be characterized by youth: approximately 5,150 of the new immigrants were 17 or under, 9,500 were between the ages of 18 and 35, 3,000 were between 36 and 45, 4,600 were between 46 and 65, and just over 3,000 were 66 or older.

 

Most of the new arrivals have professional backgrounds in industry, construction, and food services (some 5,000 individuals in total), high tech and engineering (2,400), the humanities and social sciences (1,900), medical and paramedical fields (1,150), and accounting and law (1,080).

 

11% of the immigrants decided to make Tel Aviv their new home, while 10% moved to Jerusalem, 9% to Netanya, 8% to Haifa, 6% to Ashdod, 5% to Bat Yam, 4% to Ra’anana, 3% to Rishon LeZion, 3% to Be’er Sheva, and 3% to Ashkelon.

 

Chairman of the Executive of The Jewish Agency for Israel Natan Sharansky said: The high numbers of immigrants over the past two years were due, in part, to a series of external factors that have changed or disappeared, at least for the moment. At the same time, despite the downward shift this year, we see that the long-term trends continue and the number of immigrants to Israel, particularly from Western countries, remains high compared to the averages of the past fifteen years. This is evidence of the fact that Israel continues to draw Jews from around the world seeking to live lives of meaning and identity. At the same time, the numbers also indicate that the State of Israel must invest further efforts in finding solutions for the swift integration and absorption of the immigrants, with an emphasis on employment, particularly recognition of professional and academic certifications. The Jewish Agency will continue its efforts to promote Aliyah and strengthen both Jewish identity and connections to Israel among Diaspora Jewry. Thousands of Jewish young people from around the world came to Israel this year in order to participate in The Jewish Agency’s unique Israel experience programs, including Masa Israel Journey with nearly 12,000 participants, Onward Israel with some 1,600, and Machon Youth Leadership Training with some 430. These numbers are constantly on the rise and they attest to the success of these unique frameworks in drawing dynamic, educated young people to get to know Israel firsthand and strengthening ties within the global Jewish family.”

 

Minister of Aliyah and Immigrant Absorption Sofa Landver said: “Over the past year, I returned to the Ministry of Aliyah and Immigrant Absorption after a one-year absence. I never managed to cease dealing with Aliyah and absorption and so, even during my absence, I continued my unceasing efforts in the realm of Aliyah and absorption. Since my return to the ministry, I am proud to say that we are in the midst of a wave of activity and Aliyah. The special emphasis that I placed on encouraging Aliyah is bearing fruit and we are finishing the year with 27,000 new immigrants. We are strengthening and building new projects in the realms of employing immigrants and encouraging entrepreneurship across the country, with an emphasis on Jerusalem, the Negev, and the Galilee. We have continued to act in order to remove barriers to immigrants’ employment and we reached a particular high in job placements this year. I fought and managed to increase the annual budget for local authorities, to increase activities with young people and students, and I will not give up and will continue to act ceaselessly in the realm of housing, along with our achievements this year. Our work in the field of Aliyah and absorption is challenging and extensive, but I believe that when those who deal with Aliyah and absorption do so from the heart, with faith and vision, success is guaranteed. I wish us all that we will continue to place the immigrants at the center of our work, to ease their new lives in Israel by removing barriers, minimizing bureaucracy, and making information more accessible, and of course to continue encouraging immigration to Israel.”